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  • Outreach Services | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    Counseling Services ASU Counseling Services Home About Us Services Crisis Services Consultation Services Group Counseling Individual Counseling Outreach Services Smoking Cessation Billing Concerned About a Student FAQ Locations Outreach Services ASU Counseling Services staff provides preventive and educational interventions to staff and student populations through training seminars and outreach programs Training seminars are provided to faculty staff and students and have included academic departments advising staff learning support services just to name a few Topics of interest often include but are not limited to identifying and assisting students who may be experiencing depression stress suicidal ideation and other indicators of increasing distress or engaging in substance abuse eating disordered behavior or other risky behavior Outreach efforts are audience specific and can be tailored to a particular need For instance outreach presentations may be actively delivered to a particular class or group or may simply be tabling to provide information about our services and answer questions during orientation Common topics of interest for outreach include academic skills personal concerns healthy relationships peak performance and stress management Services Crisis Services Consultation Services Group Counseling Individual Counseling Outreach Services Smoking Cessation Billing My ASU Find all your personalized information related to ASU in

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/services/outreach (2014-10-21)
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  • Smoking Cessation | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    Skysong Research Park Washington D C China Directory Search Search ASU Counseling Services ASU Counseling Services Home About Us Services Crisis Services Consultation Services Group Counseling Individual Counseling Outreach Services Smoking Cessation Billing Concerned About a Student FAQ Locations Smoking Cessation ASU Counseling Services provides a 4 week workshop to support students who want to quit tobacco use A multidisciplinary team of ASU professionals address the psychological and physiological components of nicotine dependence The workshop includes education skill building medical interventions and even acupuncture to help people quit and remain tobacco free Come join with others like you that are making the healthy decision to be tobacco free and QUIT For information on the workshop contact ASU Counseling Services Monday Friday 8 a m 5 p m Downtown Phoenix 602 496 1155 Polytechnic 480 727 1255 Tempe 480 965 6146 West 602 543 8125 For more information on the ASU Tobacco Free Initiative and ASU Quitting Resources go to https eoss asu edu tobaccofree Services Crisis Services Consultation Services Group Counseling Individual Counseling Outreach Services Smoking Cessation Billing My ASU Find all your personalized information related to ASU in one place Admission Freshman Transfer International Readmission Graduate Law Counselor and

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/services/smoking (2014-10-21)
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  • Counseling Services Billing | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    for all students no matter how you pay for services The amount of money that ASU charges for services is based upon the type of the service we provide We accept the AZ Board of Regents student insurance through Aetna Student Health the ASU Bridge Plan or we can charge your student account You do not need to bring in money for your visit to be seen Description of Services Fee for Service ASU Bridge Plan ASU Student Health Insurance Same day consult No Charge No Charge No Charge Assessment appointment 50 minutes 50 15 Co pay 15 Brief follow up appointment 30 minutes 20 15 Co pay 15 Individual Counseling 50 minutes 40 15 Co pay 15 Couples counseling 50 minutes 40 15 Co pay 15 Group counseling fee per session 90 minutes 20 15 Co pay 15 Workshops 4 sessions 90 minutes 90 N A N A What do I need to bring to help with paying for services When seeking services at ASU Counseling Services always bring your ASU ID If you do have insurance please bring your insurance card Do you take my insurance ASU Counseling Services only accepts the AZ Board of Regents student insurance through Aetna Student Health the ASU Bridge Plan or we can charge your student account If you have another insurance provider ASU Counseling can provide you with a receipt for services that you can submit to your insurance company Many but not all insurance companies will reimburse you in whole or part for services out of network If you have questions about submitting for reimbursement please talk to the ASU Counseling Services Front Office staff Who do I contact with questions about my bill You may contact the ASU Counseling Services Front Office at 480 965 6146 What about my

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/services/billing (2014-10-21)
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  • Faculty and Staff: How you can support a student | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    experience a traumatic event such as the death of a student or a national or local event impacting students ASU Counseling Services Staff can be helpful by providing the following information on how to Identify a student in distress Talk to a student who seems to be depressed anxious and or suicidal Suggest to someone that they get professional assistance Handle a disruptive or threatening student Make an appointment for counseling services What to look for Academic Indicators Negative change in performance Continual seeking of special accommodations Essays or creative work that indicates extremes of hopelessness social isolation rage or despair Physical Indicators Deterioration of physical appearance Coming to class bleary eyed hung over or smelling of alcohol Excessive fatigue Visible changes in weight Personal Interpersonal Indicators Tearfulness Direct statements indicating distress family problems or other difficulties Unprovoked anger or hostility A hunch or gut level reaction that something is wrong Safety Risk Indicators Written or verbal statement of finality or suicidal thoughts or thoughts of harming others Giving away of prized possessions History of suicidal thoughts or attempts Self injuries or self destructive behaviors Issues to consider when talking to a student in distress Avoid making promises of confidentiality particularly if a student represents a safety risk to self or others High distress students need swift professional intervention and assurances of absolute confidentiality may inadvertently hinder student cooperation It is acceptable to stay in role as a faculty or staff member You do not have to take on the role of counselor You need only to watch and refer If you do feel comfortable discussing a problem with a student you may still want to consult with a counselor What you can do You can discuss your concerns directly and plainly with the student and listen for their response

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/info/faculty (2014-10-21)
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  • Parents: How to support your ASU student | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    Promoting Student Welfare and Campus Safety Semester Stress and Anxiety FAQ Locations Parents How to support your ASU student ASU Counseling Services offers parents the opportunity to talk with a counselor about concerns you may have about your student Parents can be very helpful in encouraging their student to seek help Some common situations among students in which parents contact us for consultation are A drop in grades Repeated absences from class Expressions of hopelessness or worthlessness Discussion of suicidal ideation More withdrawn or animated than usual Deterioration in personal hygiene Personality change Excessive sleepiness or conversely a need for little sleep A hunch or gut level reaction that something is wrong ASU Counseling Staff can be helpful by providing the following information How to know if your student is in distress How to talk to your student who seems to be depressed anxious and or suicidal How to suggest your student get professional assistance How to make an appointment for ASU Counseling Services What ASU and off campus resources are available to assist your student To contact a counselor call any of the ASU Counseling Service Locations Concerned About a Student For Faculty and Staff For Parents For a

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/info/parents (2014-10-21)
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  • How to Help a Friend | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    behaviors Concerns about alcohol or other drug use What Can You Do Talk to your friend A direct expression of concern to your friend is an appropriate course of action if You feel comfortable doing so Your friend is not in a serious mental health crisis e g where immediate professional help is needed to address safety concerns or other extreme circumstances If you choose to speak with your friend below are some tips to guide your discussion Identify the right time and place Make sure you find a private space and choose a time when you both can be uninterrupted and focused on the conversation Do not promise confidentiality secrets Depending on what your friend discloses you may have to alert professionals to make sure your friend and others remain safe Although you cannot promise to keep anything a secret you can promise to respect your friend s privacy by only sharing information with professionals or others who can help if needed Focus on the behaviors Everyone can experience some discomfort when hearing feedback about themselves The most effective way to decrease someone s sensitivity and at times defensiveness in such situations is to 1 focus on their behavior not their personality and 2 avoid making interpretations about why they are engaging in the behavior For example it is better to say I am concerned about you because I noticed you have not gone to class in a couple of weeks and you are sleeping a lot rather than I think you might be depressed Avoid judgment Regardless of the situation or the circumstances nobody likes to feel judged You may have opinions about your friend s behavior but remember that the behavior reflects their struggle to cope effectively with stress or difficult emotions Make an effort to be aware of your opinions and keep these private Listen Listening is more than just hearing what someone says it is about someone feeling heard General listening skills such as speaking softly not interrupting maintaining eye contact reflecting back what you are hearing clarifying and being patient can be very helpful Remember that silence can be golden and it provides someone with the opportunity to share more So try to resist the temptation to fill in the silence if there are brief lapses in conversation Suggest helpful resources After you have given your friend space and time to respond to your concerns and share their reactions and feelings try to engage them in collective brainstorming about a range of possible solutions Remember there are numerous resources at ASU to assist students with challenges or stressors they are facing If you are not sure what is available ask a faculty or staff member If you think your friend may benefit from speaking with a counselor you can accompany your friend to any ASU Counseling Services location between 8a m 5p m M F and ask to speak with a counselor No appointment is necessary Sometimes accompanying someone can be the additional support

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/info/friend (2014-10-21)
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  • Promoting Student Welfare and Campus Safety | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    stress may even result in thoughts of self harm or suicide As someone who interacts with students on a regular basis you are in a pivotal position to identify behavior that may be of concern Your expression of concern and empathy can be helpful to a student in distress We are aware that it can be difficult to know when to be concerned about a student especially for those who are not mental health professionals Students experiencing stress or a sense of being overwhelmed may exhibit their problems in a variety of ways While there is no template for identifying a concerning student the following are some warning signs that may indicate distress or a significant emotional concern Marked nervousness agitation or irritability Inappropriately aggressive or abrasive behavior Excessive procrastination and or poorly prepared work Pattern of infrequent class attendance little or no work completed Apparent depression or lack of energy Marked change in personal hygiene Withdrawal indecisiveness and or confusion Comments written or verbal that suggest thoughts about harming oneself or any threats to another person Bizarre alarming statements or evidence that a student is engaging in dangerous behavior If you find that you are concerned about a student it is important to know that there are steps you can take and resources available to support you We encourage you if possible to speak directly to the student and express your concern We also want you to be aware of and seek consultation from University resources such as those listed below We are here to help ASU Counseling Services staff is available to provide consultation anytime between 8 a m 5 p m Monday thru Friday 480 965 6146 will connect you to any of our four campus locations After business hours call the EMPACT ASU dedicated hotline at

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/concerned/student_welfare (2014-10-21)
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  • Semester Stress and Anxiety | Educational Outreach and Student Services
    some stress related to academics may interact with any number of life challenges such as relationship concerns or the ongoing economic challenges that affects us all so much For a few people stress may even intensify into feelings of depression or thoughts of self harm or suicide Fortunately there are healthy strategies to help you manage stress during tough times First stay connected with those around you This can be tough to do especially when we start feeling bad However when we isolate ourselves we tend to feel and think things are even worse So reach out and ask for help when you need it Equally important is being able to give support to others If someone you know seems to be going through a difficult time reaching out and expressing your concern may be more helpful than you imagine Second take back some control by directly confronting stressors and creating a plan Write down your situation as well as specific solutions within your control for addressing those stressors Confronting stress can cause a temporary increase in stress but getting a plan down on paper will reduce stress in the long run for most people A plan can include gathering more information about options and asking for help Once a plan has been developed commit to it and review it regularly Third identify and change unhealthy coping strategies Stress can lead us to start doing things we know are not healthy such as eating poorly or using alcohol or other drugs It can also lead us to stop doing things we know are healthy such as exercising or going to bed on time While it can be tempting in the short run to rationalize such behavior the result is usually an increase in our stress rather than a decrease Last

    Original URL path: https://eoss.asu.edu/counseling/concerned/stress_anxiety (2014-10-21)
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