archive-edu.com » EDU » A » ASU.EDU

Total: 71

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Welcome | Teo Research Lab
    courtesy of ASU Take a behind the scenes look at the ASU Research Laboratory in San Juan Teotihuacan Right People faculty spotlight George Cowgill Research Professor Cowgill s work at Teotihuacan spans five decades and is highlighted by his involvement in the massive mapping and surface collection project led by Dr René Millon in the 1960s Considered one of the world s top minds on the ancient city Cowgill recently published the first comprehensive book on Teotihuacan Read more Bottom Left in the news View all SEPTEMBER 2015 German television crew films at the lab JUNE 2015 Archaeologist captures ancient city s life and legacy MAY 2015 Liquid mercury found beneath Teotihuacan temple FEBRUARY 2015 Study shows city growth appears the same since ancient times NOVEMBER 2014 New artifacts give clues about life death in ancient city FEBRUARY 2014 Teotihuacan Major ancient city still holds firm to its mysteries FEBRUARY 2014 ASU archaeologist comments on Aztec dog burial FEBRUARY 2014 Rock art center coordinator brings together past and present through programming FEBRUARY 2014 Exhibit explores mysteries of City of the Gods JANUARY 2014 Ancient cities series to launch with look at Teotihuacan OCTOBER 2013 Immersive Teotihuacan exhibit 10 years in

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/ (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive


  • About Teotihuacan | Teo Research Lab
    long before the Aztecs of the 1400s It covered about 8 square miles and housed around 80 000 people Teotihuacan was one of the largest ancient cities anywhere in the world Its influences were strongly felt throughout central and southern Mexico and impacted even the distant Maya of Yucatán and Guatemala Teotihuacan is a UNESCO World Heritage site visited every year by millions of tourists who are awed by its vast ceremonial center its art and its immense pyramids among the largest anywhere in the ancient New World and comparable to the largest in ancient Egypt But most of the city is still unexcavated and not seen by tourists Multiple archaeological projects are ongoing carried out by Mexican and other institutions Arizona State University faculty and students play a leading role in these projects and ASU maintains a large research facility adjacent to the site Unlike many ancient cities much of the archaeological site is not deeply buried under modern settlement Because of this archaeologists can excavate and reconstruct large parts of the city and create an unprecedented story of ancient urban life Teotihuacan has much to teach us about the origins and declines of cities alternative forms of government the nature of ancient urban life and the ways that religion governance markets and economies can change through time These and many other questions about the ancient city can be answered only if archaeologists continue their fieldwork at the site As archaeological methods continue to improve excavations are becoming more informative and Teotihuacan is beginning to give up its secrets to science These advances are the fruit of international and inter institutional collaborations in which the ASU managed archaeological facility at Teotihuacan plays a vital role For more information see the following blog posts about Teotihuacan Teotihuacan ancient Mesoamerican metropolis

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/about/about (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Overview of the Ancient City | Teo Research Lab
    originally and then became a truly metropolitan city where intra and interstate socio economic activities took place well beyond the Mexican Central highland areas However Teotihuacan was mostly destroyed sometime during the 6th century with still unspecified reasons The city was thereafter target for looting or mortuary activities gradually becoming a legendary spot in the following centuries Around the 15th century the Aztecs found the city in ruins with only large mounds and called it Teotihuacan meaning the place of the gods in their Nahuatl language They believed this to be the sacred place according to the post Classic myth of creation where the gods sacrificed themselves to create the present world the Sun the Moon and lives of the natural world This mythological concept of sacred space remained for centuries and after so long it was still applied to interpret findings of this ancient city in early 20th century archaeological projects Recent excavations at the monuments are changing views on Teotihuacan s mythological origin and providing new historical perspectives We now know that the pyramids did not sustain a single permanent form for centuries as Teotihuacan leaders modified enlarged or partially destroyed the pyramids throughout the city s history Rulers used to perform sacrificial rituals of people and powerful animals at the monuments to proclaim their power with militarism which had a great impact on urban life as well as on other aspects of the Mexican Highlands Additionally burial discoveries indicate that the three pyramids were closely related In summary new data indicate that the people of Teotihuacan were obsessed with capturing their cosmological ideas at a large scale through human sacrificial rituals and sacred warfare Teotihuacan was one of the most influential pilgrimage centers of the North American continent attracting numerous people from different ethnic groups under strong

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/about/overview-ancient-city (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • About the ASU Teotihuacan Laboratory | Teo Research Lab
    The ASU managed facility at Teotihuacan is part of the School of Human Evolution and Social Change in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences It was initiated by professor René Millon of the University of Rochester who directed the detailed mapping of the entire city in the 1960s combining air photos and mapping with surface reconnaissance of over 5 000 individual tracts making notes on visible features and collecting nearly a million pottery fragments and other ancient objects from the surfaces of these tracts His Mapping Project remains unique for its combination of scale and detail It is an indispensable basis for planning further work at the city ASU research professor George Cowgill took over as director of the present laboratory location in 1986 with assistance from the National Science Foundation following Millon s retirement Today it houses the materials collected by a number of projects besides Millon s Mapping Project and provides housing and work space for up to 10 researchers including students with a total floor space of about 1 160 square meters Professor Michael E Smith a renowned Mesoamerican expert and archaeologist took over directing the lab in 2015 About Us About Teotihuacan Overview of the

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/about/about-asu-teotihuacan-laboratory (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Faculty + Staff | Teo Research Lab
    Her major efforts at Teotihuacan include the study of production and consumption of ritual lapidary objects and the technology and organization of textile and ceramic production systems Her recent research addresses the socio economic integration of low status sectors of the Teotihuacan society as well as issues concerning craft production by independent craftspeople George Cowgill Research Professor In the 1960s George Cowgill assisted in the comprehensive mapping and surface collection of remains of the entire 8 square mile ancient city directed by Dr René Millon Since then much of his effort has gone into computer aided spatial and statistical analyses of the data collected by that project In 1988 89 he collaborated with Rubén Cabrera of the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History and Saburo Sugiyama in excavations that permanently changed the pacific image of early Teotihuacan by revealing nearly 200 sacrificial victims at the Pyramid of the Feathered Serpent also known as the Temple of Quetzalcóatl These projects have been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation the National Institute for the Humanities the National Geographic Society and other sources Cowgill has served on the Executive Committee of the Society for American Archaeology as consulting editor for mathematics and statistics for American Antiquity the leading journal for North American archaeology and as advisory editor for archaeology for Current Anthropology He has held a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences Stanford Calif He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is a recipient of the Pomerance Award for Scientific Contributions to Archaeology from the Archaeological Institute of America the Excellence in Archaeological Analysis award of the Society for American Archaeology and the A V Kidder Award for Eminence in American Archaeology from the Archeology Division of the American Anthropological Association Saburo Sugiyama Research Professor Saburo Sugiyama obtained his Ph D from ASU in 1995 Along with his ASU position Sugiyama is also a professor in the Graduate School of International Cultural Studies at Aichi Prefectural University Japan He has been the assistant director of the Feathered Serpent Pyramid Project the co director of the Moon Pyramid Project with Rubén Cabrera Castro of the National Institute of Anthropology and History in Mexico INAH and is currently an assistant director of the Sun Pyramid Project Sugiyama s major research interests are on Mesoamerican social histories particularly Teotihuacan ancient urbanism iconography and symbolism and theories of cognitive archaeology His recent publications include the following 2010 Teotihuacan City Layout as a Cosmogram Preliminary Results of the 2007 Measurement Unit Study In The Archaeology of Measurement Comprehending Heaven Earth and Time in Ancient Societies Iain Morley and Colin Renfrew eds 130 149 Cambridge University Press 2007 Co authored with R Cabrera The Moon Pyramid Project and the Teotihuacan State Polity A Brief Summary of the 1998 2004 Excavations Ancient Mesoamerica 18 109 125 2007 Co authored by Leonardo Lopez Lujan Dedicatory Burial Offering Complexes at the Moon Pyramid Teotihuacan A Preliminary Report

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/people/faculty-staff (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Research Vision | Teo Research Lab
    ASU Teotihuacan Research Laboratory is a coordinated series of projects focused on specific answerable questions centered on the urban nature of the city that will enable meaningful comparisons between Teotihuacan and modern cities Topics of interest include the degree of socioeconomic inequality among households differences among the varied districts of the city the nature of governance of both the city and the state it ruled the organization and technologies of craft workshops and the extent of state control versus independent producers and the nature of commercial institutions The overriding question is the extent to which Teotihuacan was similar to modern cities and the extent to which it was different What lessons does the ancient city have for us today For each of these topics we have inklings but far more can and should be done to go beyond these inklings Because Teotihuacan flourished for some six centuries we have the opportunity to see how all these topics changed over time both through internal processes and through human and natural impacts on the environment At present little is known about this and addressing these issues of sustainability is another of our objectives Research Research Vision Current Projects Past Projects Research Themes

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/research/research-0 (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Current Projects | Teo Research Lab
    Management Map Locations Map Tempe West Polytechnic Downtown Phoenix Online and Extended Lake Havasu Thunderbird Skysong Research Park Washington D C China Directory Search Search About About Teotihuacan Overview of the City About the Lab People Faculty Staff Research Research Vision Current Projects Past Projects Research Themes News Events News Galleries Social Media Portal Contact Physical Mailing Address Support Home Research Current Projects Current Projects Researcher Profile David Walton Excavations at Plaza of the Columns Director Saburo Sugiyama Arizona State University Tlajinga Project Directors David Carballo Boston University Luis Barba Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Kenneth Hirth Penn State The Almenas of Teotihuacan Director Michael E Smith Arizona State University Research Research Vision Current Projects Excavations at Plaza of the Columns The Almenas of Teotihuacan Tlajinga Project Past Projects Research Themes Example Book Icon Block Study with us at the School of Human Evolution and Social Change At its peak Teotihuacan was home to more than 80 000 people About Us About Teotihuacan Overview of the City About the Lab People Faculty Staff Research Research Vision Current Projects Past Projects Research Themes News Events News Galleries Social Media Portal Contact Us Physical Mailing Address Support Copyright Trademark Accessibility Privacy Jobs

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/research/current-projects (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Past Projects | Teo Research Lab
    Polytechnic Downtown Phoenix Online and Extended Lake Havasu Thunderbird Skysong Research Park Washington D C China Directory Search Search About About Teotihuacan Overview of the City About the Lab People Faculty Staff Research Research Vision Current Projects Past Projects Research Themes News Events News Galleries Social Media Portal Contact Physical Mailing Address Support Home Research Past Projects Past Projects Pyramid of the Moon Project Directors Saburo Sugiyama Arizona State University Ruben Cabrera Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History Feathered Serpent Pyramid Project Directors Saburo Sugiyama Arizona State University Ruben Cabrera Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History George Cowgill Arizona State University Details to come Teotihuacan Mapping Project Details to come Research Research Vision Current Projects Past Projects Pyramid of the Moon Project 1998 2004 Feathered Serpent Pyramid Project Teotihuacan Mapping Project Research Themes Example Book Icon Block Study with us at the School of Human Evolution and Social Change The ASU Teotihuacan Research Laboratory was established by Professor Emeritus George Cowgill in 1987 About Us About Teotihuacan Overview of the City About the Lab People Faculty Staff Research Research Vision Current Projects Past Projects Research Themes News Events News Galleries Social Media Portal Contact Us Physical Mailing Address

    Original URL path: http://teo.asu.edu/research/past-projects (2015-12-07)
    Open archived version from archive



  •