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  • Center for Research on Native American Issues
    article here Myers center ANNOUNCES NEW Publication The Myers Center announces the publication of a working paper by former Fellow Pam Mei Wai Graybeal Municipal Parks An Environmental Justice Analysis of Conditions and Use in the San Francisco East Bay MYERS CENTER Hosts Native American Museum Studies Institute In January 2013 22 professionals and volunteers from tribal museums and cultural centers gathered for four days of training in museum skills The participants from California Arizona Oklahoma Alaska Washington and South Dakota came from a range of institutions including some in the planning stages and they all rated the training very highly One person commented on the variety of materials topics and participant sharing In addition to learning from presenters from the Myers Center the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center the Phoebe A Hearst Museum of Anthropology the Center for Digital Archaeology the C N Gorman Museum and the Huhugam Heritage Center they enjoyed the opportunity to get to know each other and share experiences One participant was especially pleased by meeting all the other participants and learning from institutions that are already established and those with great knowledge MYERS CENTER RELEASES DEADLY ROADS REPORT Researchers at the Myers Center recently completed a pilot project that examined fatality and injury rates involving pedestrians and motorists on main thoroughfares in or near Indian country in Humboldt County California Every year thousands of motorists die and millions more are injured on the nation s roadways But while the number of fatal crashes nationally has declined by 2 over the past 25 years the number of vehicle related fatalities in or near Indian country has increased over 50 In order to understand the reasons for this increase and to begin developing safety countermeasures we need better data documenting the problem This pilot study

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/ (2014-12-03)
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  • About the Center | Center for Research on Native American Issues
    hosting conferences colloquia and other events open to the public on topics of concern to Native communities Center Co Chair Joseph A Myers Joseph A Myers a Pomo Indian of northern California is the Executive Director of the National Indian Justice Center NIJC a non profit corporation with principal offices in Santa Rosa California He founded the NIJC in 1983 as an independent resource for tribal governments and their courts The NIJC creates and conducts legal education research and technical assistance programs aimed at improving the administration of justice in Indian country From 1976 to 1983 Mr Myers served as associate director of the American Indian Lawyer Training Program creating and managing its tribal court advocate training project He is a graduate of the University of California Berkeley School of Law at Boalt Hall Mr Myers has contributed significantly to the improvement of justice in Indian country For the past 15 years he has lectured in Native American Studies at U C Berkeley In 1993 Mr Myers received national recognition from Attorney General Janet Reno for his work on behalf of victims of crime in Indian country Mr Myers has received numerous awards including the 2002 California Peace Prize from The California Wellness Foundation and the 2010 Peter E Haas Public Service Award from UC Berkeley Additionally Mr Myers is a founder and board member of the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center Since 2002 he has served as Chairperson of CALTRANS Native American Advisory Committee CENTER CO CHAIR Martín Sánchez Jankowski Martín Sánchez Jankowski Yaqui is Professor Sociology at the University of California at Berkeley In addition to being Founder and Co Chair of the Joseph A Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues he is Director of the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues and Director

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/about (2014-12-03)
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  • Scholars | Center for Research on Native American Issues
    Environmental Science Policy and Management Leanne Hinton Professor emerita Linguistics UC Berkeley Ricardo G Huerta Niño Ph D City and Regional Planning UC Berkeley Shari Huhndorf Professor Native American Studies UC Berkeley Lynn Huntsinger Professor Rangeland Ecology and Management Environmental Science Policy and Management UC Berkeley Teresa LaFromboise Professor of Education Director of Native American Studies Stanford University Kent Lightfoot Professor Anthropology UC Berkeley Joseph Myers Lecturer Native American Studies UC Berkeley and Executive Director National Indian Justice Center Jeff Oxendine Associate Dean Public Health Practice School of Public Health UC Berkeley Diane Pearson Lecturer Native American Studies UC Berkeley Beth Piatote Assistant Professor Native American Studies UC Berkeley Beth Rose Middleton Assistant Professor Native American Studies UC Davis Martín Sánchez Jankowski Professor Sociology UC Berkeley Jennifer Sowerwine Research Specialist Environmental Science Policy and Management UC Berkeley Hertha Sweet Wong Associate Professor in the Department of English and Chair of the Department of Art Practice UC Berkeley GRADUATE FELLOWs Tria Andrews Ethnic Studies UC Berkeley Olivia Chilcote Ethnic Studies UC Berkeley Graduate Students Vreni Michelini Castillo Art Practice UC Berkeley Sibyl Diver Environmental Science Policy and Management UC Berkeley John Dougherty Ethnic Studies UC Berkeley Brian Gillis English UC Berkeley

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/scholars (2014-12-03)
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  • Research | Center for Research on Native American Issues
    pair a decolonizing approach to research with indigenous communities along with an approach that privileges the collective as the unit of analysis in order to challenge the dominant research paradigms and create a research project that serves the interests of decolonization and social justice Working in tandem with a local American Indian community organization this project engages participants in a collective reflective analysis to name and engage with their experiences around schooling I use this approach which I call community engaged phenomenology to understand how American Indian youth re form negotiate and enact collective identities as Native people in relation to their education and how American Indian youth identities interface with the colonial process of schooling Shelby Nacino and John Jairo Valencia Undergraduates Ethnic Studies Voices of the Unheard The Struggle for Equality Rights in Indian County Alternative Breaks Campo Trip 2014 Many consider America to be the Land of the Free but its foundations are built on the forced removal genocide and oppression of Indigenous peoples Our ten participants will examine how U S government policies have systematically oppressed Native communities We will also examine Indigenous resistance movements that have formed in response to historic and current injustices Overall we aim to de hxstoricize Native issues to see Native issues as present urgent and current During Spring Break 2014 our participants will travel to the Campo Indian Reservation to perform service The Campo Indian Reservation is close to the Mexican border not too far from San Diego California The reservation is home to the Campo Kumeyaay Nation a band of the Kumeyaay tribe whose ancestral lands extend over a large part of Southern California and Baja California Mexico Participants will work with community partners such as tribal educational and health leaders who everyday make a difference on the Campo reservation We will work particularly with our community partners Deborah Cuero Campo Indian Reservation Education Center Director and Ann Pierce naachum yname ma na ump All of Us Moving Forward Project Director also liaison from the Mountain Empire Unified School District to coordinate college outreach appropriate to the tribal community We hope to strengthen and make more sustainable our relationship with the Campo Kumeyaay Nation as well as offer participants the opportunity to engage in critical dialogue and learn about how we can use our own privileges to be allies with Indigenous peoples Peter Nelson PhD Candidate Anthropology Rebuilding Relationships with Land Sacred Sites and Resources through Community Based Low Impact Strategies for Archaeology in the San Francisco Bay Area Tolay Lake Regional Park TLRP and Tolay Creek Ranch TCR in Northern California are properties that have been recently acquired and converted into park land The master plan for the development and management of this park is still being created by the Sonoma County Regional Parks Department SCRPD and the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria FIGR the Native American descendent community of this area Park development has the potential to adversely impact archaeological sites and sacred places The master plan will also lay out a plan for restoration and management of indigenous plants and animals on the property As a tribal citizen of FIGR and a member of my tribe s Sacred Sites Protection Committee and Tolay Advisory Group I am undertaking eco archaeological research to help us understand more about the cultural and natural history of the Tolay Valley Provided more information about the flora and fauna of Tolay FIGR will be able to comment more precisely about cultural and natural resource management during the master planning process to ensure that sensitive resources are not adversely impacted by the development of the park This project employs innovative low impact methodological strategies to gain as much information as we can about regional cultural and natural history while impacting the archaeological site under investigation as little as possible 2012 13 Mini Grant Research Projects Tria Andrews PhD Student Ethnic Studies Education on the Reservation Punishing and Curing through Culturally Relevant Curriculum At the intersection of Native American Education and Critical Prison Studies my project examines the trajectory of the punitive nature of educational programs for youth on Rosebud Indian Reservation from the founding of St Francis Mission School 1886 1972 to present day The primary purpose of my research is to investigate how colonial education paradigms have influenced the curriculum at Wanbli Wiconi Tipi the tribally run juvenile detention facility founded in 2005 on the Rosebud Reservation My research compares mission education in the mid 20th century with the current rehabilitative program at Wanbli Wiconi Tipi Using archival research and interviews with program directors and incarcerated youth I will address my central research questions What is the difference in function between punishing curing and educating at Wanbli Wiconi Tipi What do the programs offered by these institutions at different points in time tell us about Western and Lakota perceptions of deviance and normativity in paradigms of young femininity and masculinity Jesse Dutton Kenny Undergraduate Ethnic Studies Voices of the Unheard The Struggle for Equality and Rights in Indian Country Campo Kumeyaay Nation Alternative Break Trip Throughout the Alternative Breaks experience we will explore complex issues facing the Campo Kumeyaay Native community such as identity representation historical contexts health education environmental and food justice and poverty Our spring semester DeCal course focuses on understanding justice and equality in Campo Kumeyaay through direct service and building lasting connections with the community members Throughout the weeklong service learning trip we will work with Sylvia Johnson the founder of this Alternative Breaks trip and member of the Campo Kumeyaay Nation We recognize the importance of building sustainable and committed relationships with Native peoples in situations and we are honored to work with Sylvia who began this decade long relationship with her tribe many years ago and who will help us design meaningful projects to benefit the tribe using Cal Corps and University resources as well as the energies of our student participants Ricardo Huerta Ni ñ o PhD Candidate City and Regional Planning Toward a

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/node/2 (2014-12-03)
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  • Mini-grants | Center for Research on Native American Issues
    1 000 Grant Period and Use of Funds Applications will be reviewed and grants will be awarded in February 2014 Funds must be used by March 1 2015 Any unused funds will be retained by the Center Funds may be used only to pay direct costs related to the proposed project such as travel to research sites research supplies photocopying transcription services and equipment rental Funds may not be used for equipment purchases stipends living expenses conference attendance or educational travel Grant payments will be made in the form of reimbursement for expenses Requirements All students must work with a faculty mentor Faculty mentors may include Lecturers and other non Senate Academic Staff The student s mentor must commit to supporting and advising the applicant throughout the research project Students must submit a final report no later than April 1 2015 containing an itemized expense report a statement of what was accomplished and a list of papers and or publications that directly or indirectly result from the grant Application Process Applications are due on Tuesday February 18 2014 by 4 00pm at the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues see address below Late applications will not be considered All applications must include the following materials Incomplete applications will not be considered Applicant Information and Agreement Form Section I 250 word Abstract of the project Section II Project Description Section III The project description should be no more than 1 000 words It should include a description of the problem being studied the research question and hypotheses a description of the research methodology and the contribution the research will make to the study of contemporary issues that are of concern to the Native community where you will be doing your research Budget and Explanation of Budget Section IV Project Timeline

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/research/mini-grants (2014-12-03)
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  • Training | Center for Research on Native American Issues
    g participant observation computer assisted data management programs statistical analysis in depth interviewing how to conduct evaluations and surveys in Indian country and Federal Indian Law 101 e g tribal sovereignty tribal governance issues Graduate Fellows Training Program For more than thirty years the Graduate Fellows Training Program has provided an interdisciplinary research and training environment as a complement to advanced degree programs in the social sciences and professional schools Over 100 graduate student fellows have successfully completed their doctoral studies and gone on to establish distinguished academic careers that have significantly influenced their respective disciplines R ead more about the program here Summer Internship and Mentoring Program The Joseph A Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues in collaboration with the Center for Urban Ethnography CUE at the University of California at Berkeley is offering a free research program for highly motivated undergraduate social scientists This program will provide mentorship hands on research experience and advanced training in designing and executing a project using qualitative methods for all who attend To read more about the program click here Native American Museum Studies Institute The Joseph A Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues in collaboration with the

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/training (2014-12-03)
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  • Graduate Fellows | Center for Research on Native American Issues
    nurture the next generation of leading scholars Berkeley s graduate programs attract the best and the brightest faculty and students and the campus is home to an astonishing number of top ranked departments As a result the Graduate Fellows Program can bring together students of the highest caliber across a range of disciplines and link them to faculty who are doing groundbreaking research A number of these students come from diverse backgrounds and the problems that they study are not simply abstractions but are grounded in their own experience Program Overview and Training Content The Center for the Research on Social Change serves as the research and teaching base for the Graduate Fellows Training Program Fellows attend a weekly two hour seminar in which they receive practical training in theory methods and policy work The core emphasis is on field research and the production of scholarly work geared towards a broad understanding of the patterns of social change in the structures social practices and culture of U S cities The training draws on insights from a wide array of fields including sociology urban anthropology political science urban and regional planning geography education history public policy law social welfare and public health Some Fellows also participate in ongoing research conducted by the Institute and its affiliated faculty Graduate Fellows can participate in the GFP for up to two years During the first year the focus of the training program is on the development of a working paper based on dissertation research Fellows will receive training in selecting and framing a research problem situating the research within the relevant scholarly literature choosing the appropriate research approach and methods conducting preliminary research and drafting a research working paper Papers are drafted by the end of March and completed by the end of the academic year after which they are added to the California Digital Library the University of California s eScholarship Repository In addition to regular attendance at weekly seminars Fellows are expected to provide and receive critical feedback on other Fellows works in progress and to be active and contributing members of an interdisciplinary community of young scholars In the spring semester first year Fellows make a public presentation of their working papers at an ISSI organized colloquium panel or conference The presentation provides an opportunity in conjunction with development of the working paper to receive feedback and build skill at crafting a rhetorically and academically effective documentation of one s research Graduate Fellows who are active program participants and successfully complete the requirements during the first year i e regular attendance completion and presentation of a research working paper are eligible to apply for a second year as a Fellow During the second year Fellows continue to meet weekly to present and receive constructive feedback on their individual research and writing projects in addition to receiving skills training in professional development to prepare them for the academic job market They also work with Center staff to plan a spring colloquia series

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/grad_fellows (2014-12-03)
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  • Undergrads | Center for Research on Native American Issues
    an assessment of the student s academic record and proposed project UC Berkeley students will be given priority Students who are not engaged in research on issues affecting Native American communities may still apply for the program and if selected pay the program cost of 1200 each For more information go to http cer berkeley edu Who is eligible Advanced undergraduate students rising juniors and seniors students who have just graduated and beginning graduate students from any college or university Does the program provide housing Unfortunately the center does not provide housing options Options listed through the University are also available here http summer berkeley edu student services student housing Summer sublets of students away for the summer are plentiful through Craigslist com What is expected of students Students must attend all seminars approximately six hours each week and complete all assigned readings and research projects approximately 15 hours each week Students must develop or continue an empirical research project that uses qualitative methods and concerns issues affecting Native American communities today May I receive course credit for this internship The Center for Ethnographic Research is not a university department that can provide credit for successful completion of the course However some universities will award students credit for participating in the internship Please check with your university and home department What can students gain from this internship program Methodological Training Students will obtain advanced knowledge and training in observational and interview research methods These skills will assist with undergraduate honors thesis graduate school research projects and research jobs both in and outside of academia Data Analysis Training CER also provides extensive training in qualitative research analysis using ATLAS ti which can provide a competitive advantage for research jobs and graduate school Graduate School Training The internship is run much like a graduate school course and is designed to give students a preview of the graduate school experience Additionally the internship offers a workshop covering each section of the graduate school application process including a review of personal statements We will also cover such topics as where to apply to graduate schools how to decide between schools once you have been accepted and how to find research funding What do students do with their CER training CER interns have entered graduate programs in the social sciences and policy at Harvard UC Berkeley University of Wisconsin Madison New York University UCLA University of Michigan and Northwestern University Others have used their training to enter academic and community based research positions and to work as activists in local and international contexts What do graduates say about the CER Internship training The CUE Internship gave a community of inquisitive and exceptional undergraduates the opportunity to continue thinking critically about interview and ethnographic methods I felt lucky to be among those undergraduates Given that the internship provided a deeper engagement with qualitative methods in six weeks than other classes offer in an entire semester I would recommend the program to any undergraduate serious about research

    Original URL path: http://crnai.berkeley.edu/training/undergrads (2014-12-03)
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