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  • CTSP | Center for Technology, Society and Policy
    our fellows will conduct projects in each of the focus areas Learn More Write for Citizen Technologist Citizen Technologist is a new blog featuring interesting ideas and viewpoints from students researchers and practitioners like you Visit the blog to learn how to get involved Learn More The Center for Technology Society Policy is located within the School of Information at UC Berkeley If you have questions or ideas feel free

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/ (2016-04-02)
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  • CTSP | About the Center
    technical standard setting processes How can technologists work with governments to promote understanding of technical infrastructure How is technology changing the nature of citizenship How can we support free speech and protect against harassment How can technology support participation in the political process How does social media affect the behaviors of citizens politicians government agencies corporations and NGOs Is technology widening a partisan gap How might technology narrow it How can we use Big Data to understand public opinion and social movements Leadership CTSP is led by co directors Galen Panger and Nick Doty If you see us on campus stop and say hello or feel free to send us an email or a tweet Nicholas Doty npdoty ischool berkeley edu Nick Doty is a PhD Candidate at the School of Information studying how privacy and other values are considered during the technical design process He researches privacy in technical standard setting and other multi stakeholder fora and co teaches the Technology Delegation seminar He also works with the World Wide Web Consortium and Internet Architecture Board on improving support for privacy and security in Web and Internet standards Send Nick an email or a message on Twitter Galen Panger galen ischool berkeley edu Galen Panger is a PhD Candidate at the School of Information specializing in social media behavior happiness and well being and behavioral economics His dissertation examines growing interest in using social media Big Data to make inferences about public well being Galen also recently worked with the UC Berkeley Graduate Assembly to produce the graduate student happiness and well being report He has a bachelor s degree in Public Policy from Stanford and worked for three years in Washington D C for Google Send Galen an email or a message on Twitter Faculty and staff of

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/about (2016-04-02)
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  • CTSP | People
    Users Youth in the Internet Cafes of Urban Ghana The MIT Press came out in May 2012 She has a PhD in Sociology from the London School of Economics Before pursuing her PhD she was an Application Concept Developer in the People and Practices Research Group at Intel Corporation For over 10 years she has been studying the appropriation of Information and Communication Technologies ICTs by individuals and groups on the African continent Her theoretical interests span several areas including theories of materiality user agency transnationalism post colonial relations and digital representation Jordan Suchow Project Plain Writing Jordan Suchow is a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Cognitive and Brain Sciences at UC Berkeley His research examines the perceptual and cognitive processes that limit our ability to see remember and learn from the world around us and then develops technologies and techniques to overcome those limitations Jordan studied computer science at Brandeis B S vision at NYU and psychology at Harvard M A Ph D His work appears in PNAS Current Biology and Nature among others and he has created and released software systems and tools used by hundreds of researchers MemToolbox Wallace and Dissertate He is the co creator of proselint with CTSP fellow Michael Pacer Katherine Lo Project Promoting Ethical Technical Cultures and Digital Citizenship for Low Income and Minority Students in Richmond California Katherine Lo is a doctoral student in Informatics at UC Irvine living in the San Francisco Bay Area during the 2015 2016 school year Her research is committed to understanding and countering ideological biases and sociostructural inequalities in computer science education Katherine has long been an advocate for women in gaming and computer science in particular She founded and continues to direct the biennial init together Southern California Women in Computing Conference which draws hundreds women in high school and college interested in pursuing computing careers She also founded and moderates Reddit s r GirlGamers an online community with over 30 000 members for critical discussion of women in gaming Kristen Barta Project Room for Improvement Can Migrant Support Services Augment Their Impact with Innovative Technological Solutions Kristen Barta MA Stanford is a doctoral student of Communication at the University of Washington Her research focuses on technologically mediated social support and healing narratives of survivors of interpersonal violence IPV Her previous research compared tactics used by law enforcement anti violence non profits and journalists in reporting on IPV and proposed recommendations to reduce victim blaming and shift cultural attitudes about IPV Outside of academia Kristen has worked in the anti violence field and has written for Healthline Genentech and the Palo Alto Weekly She is committed to positioning her research at the nexus of academia and public service Kristine Gloria Project CityDrones Kristine is a Ph D candidate in Cognitive Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Kristine is currently a Researcher at the Internet Policy Initiative at MIT Computer Science and Artificial Research Laboratory Her areas of expertise include privacy human motivation decision making linked data web science communication studies and public policy She has published numerous articles and has spoken around the world on topics ranging from privacy and cloud technologies to Big Data in public policymaking Previously Kristine worked as the deputy legislative director for the Texas House of Representatives District 38 Luke Stark Project Situating Computational Research Ethics History Codes and Context Luke Stark is completing his doctorate in the Department of Media Culture and Communication at New York University Luke s dissertation project located at the intersection of science and technology studies STS media studies and the study of human computer interaction HCI examines how psychological theories of emotion and techniques designed to test track and evaluate feelings have been incorporated into digital interaction design Luke has published or has work forthcoming in Ethics Information Technology Social Media Society and The Information Society his popular writing has appeared in The Atlantic the Los Angeles Review of Books and The New Inquiry Margaret Fesenmaier Project Room for Improvement Can Migrant Support Services Augment Their Impact with Innovative Technological Solutions Margaret Fesenmaier MA Virginia Tech is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington Her research focuses on the possible pro social impacts that new communication technologies may have for migrants living abroad particularly the effect of these technologies on transnational relationships Following graduation BA Penn State Margaret volunteered with the US Peace Corps where she taught health classes at the local school and worked first hand with returned migrants Her previous work has investigated the influence of social media on the transmission of health information from migrants to their family still living in Moldova Mike Pacer Project Plain Writing Michael Pacer is a graduate student at UC Berkeley He studied psychology at Yale B A and cognitive science at UC Berkeley Ph D expected May 2016 His work focuses on computational frameworks for understanding causal induction explanation and inference using Hierarchical Bayesian models He has presented his work in NIPS SciPy the Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence BayLearn and at the annual meetings of the Cognitive Science Society He is the co creator of proselint with CTSP fellow Jordan Suchow Morgan G Ames Project Promoting Ethical Technical Cultures and Digital Citizenship for Low Income and Minority Students in Richmond California Morgan G Ames investigates how the ideologies of computing cultures lead to specific design choices policies usage patterns and other cultural and material articulations In particular she researches the role and limitations of technological utopianism in education and development projects Based on eight years of research she is writing a book on One Laptop per Child which explores the motivations behind the project and the cultural politics of a model site in Paraguay Her next project focuses on the social meanings of a one to one laptop program in the Iron Triangle of Richmond California Morgan holds a PhD in communication min anthropology from Stanford and previously studied information science and computer science at Berkeley Nathan

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/people (2016-04-02)
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  • CTSP | Projects
    other outreach that will work to overcome the structural linguistic and ideological barriers that marginalize populations like this from technological futures Room for Improvement Can Migrant Support Services Augment Their Impact with Innovative Technological Solutions Fellows Kristen Barta Margaret Fesenmaier Robyn Perry A growing body of research suggests that migrants hold a unique position at the intersection of questions about technology adoption use social policy innovation and economic imperatives This project explores the possible impact technology may have on social support for women migrants Our goals are to 1 investigate the social support needs of migrants by working with migrant communities in the SF Bay Area and Seattle as case studies 2 understand existing efforts by non profit organizations and social service agencies in these locations to address those needs 3 assess the impact new technologies such as mobile devices or new uses of existing technologies may have on migrants social support needs and 4 work with non profits and service providers to implement a technology based intervention to better support women migrants and migrant communities more broadly Infrastructure Standards Governance CityDrones Fellows Charles Belle Frank Smith Kristine Gloria Timothy Yim Municipal governments are under increasing pressure to craft effective policies to regulate UAS flying under 500 feet This is especially important for UAS operated by municipal agencies Unfortunately many local lawmakers lack the data and expertise to navigate these critical issues when promulgating UAS policies The CityDrones project provides the technical legal and policy infrastructure to foster a conversation between critical stakeholders Through a Roundtable this Project convenes UAS subject matter experts and government policymakers charged with developing the legal framework A Report will be published based on insights from the Roundtable The demand for dialogue about regulatory frameworks and technical infrastructure is clear The CityDrones project is the first step to erect a knowledge sharing network about the best methods to manage transponder data shared protocols non invasive licensing identification of operators and drones and privacy anonymization standards Coding Values in the Internet s Standards The Example of Encryption Fellow Adamantia Rachovitsa This project is embedded within the ongoing discussion on whether and if yes how we can code values and or human rights considerations in the Internet s design The question of introducing encryption in the Internet s design with a view to protect Internet users is an apt case study encapsulating many aspects of this discussion The project aims at analyzing three different perspectives on encryption first the recent standardisation work of the Internet Engineering Task Force second the international human rights law paradigm and finally the policy makers point of view The objective is to explore in what ways these different perspectives cross cut interact converge and diverge An academic article and a whitepaper tailored to the needs of policy makers in the Middle East are expected to come out of this project Digital Citizenship Digital Civic Life Using Technology for Neighborhood Watch Fellows Fan Mai Rebecca Jablonsky Stephanie Lie This project investigates the use

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/projects (2016-04-02)
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  • CTSP | Citizen Technologist
    misguided approach Without a doubt emerging drone technology is rapidly increasing the potential ability of government to engage in surveillance both intentionally and unintentionally and therefore to intrude on the privacy of its citizenry And likewise it s also absolutely true that applying traditional privacy principles such as notice consent and choice has proven incredibly challenging in the drone space For the record these are legitimate and serious concerns Yet even under exceptionally strong constructions of modern privacy rights including those enhanced protections afforded under state constitutions such as California s an indiscriminate municipal drone ban makes little long term sense A wholesale ban cuts off municipal modernization and the many potential benefits of municipal drone use for instance decreased costs and increased frequency of monitoring for the maintenance of public parks docks and bridges READ MORE March 15 2016 In Digital Citizenship The Neighbors are Watching From Offline to Online Community Policing in Oakland California By Fan Mai Rebecca Jablonsky CTSP Fellows Permalink As one of the oldest and most popular community crime prevention programs in the United States Neighborhood Watch is supposed to promote and facilitate community involvement by bringing citizens together with law enforcement in resolving local crime and policing issues However a review of Neighborhood Watch programs finds that nearly half of all properly evaluated programs have been unsuccessful The fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman an appointed neighborhood watch coordinator at that time has brought the conduct of Neighborhood Watch under further scrutiny Founded in 2010 Nextdoor is an online social networking site that connects residents of a specific neighborhood together Unlike other social media Nextdoor maintains a one to one mapping of real world community to virtual community nationwide Positioning itself as the platform for virtual neighborhood watch Nextdoor not only encourages users to post and share suspicious activities but also invites local police departments to post and monitor the share with police posts Since its establishment more than 1000 law enforcement agencies have partnered with the app including the Oakland Police Department Although Nextdoor has helped the local police to solve crimes it has also been criticized for giving voices to racial biases especially in Oakland California Activists have been particularly vocal in Oakland California a location that is historically known for diversity and black culture but is currently a site where racial issues and gentrification are contested public topics The Neighbors for Racial Justice a local activist group started by residents of Oakland has been particularly active in educating people about unconscious racial bias and working with the Oakland City Council to request specific changes to the crime and safety form that Nextdoor users fill out when posting to the site Despite the public attention and efforts made by activist groups to address the issue of racial biases controversies remain in terms of who should be held responsible and how to avoid racial profiling without stifling civic engagement in crime prevention With its rapid expansion across the United States Nextdoor is facing many challenges especially on the issues of moderation and regulation of user generated content Racial profiling might just be the tip of the iceberg Using a hyper local social network like Nextdoor can bring up pressing issues related to community identity and surveillance Neighborhoods have their own history and dynamics but Nextdoor provides identical features to every neighborhood across the entirety of the U S Will this one size fits all approach work as Nextdoor expands its user base As a private company that is involved in public issues like crime and policing what kind of social responsibility should Nextdoor have to its users How does the composition of neighborhoods affect online interactions within Nextdoor communities Is the Nextdoor neighborhood user base an accurate representation of the actual community Researching Nextdoor As researchers we seek to contribute to the conversation by conducting empirical research with Nextdoor users in three Oakland neighborhoods one that is predominantly white one that is predominantly non white and one that is ethnically diverse We hope to elucidate the ways that racial composition of a neighborhood influences the experience of using a community based social network such as Nextdoor Neighborhood 1 For example here is the demographic breakdown of one Oakland neighborhood which we will call Neighborhood 1 As you can see this area might be considered fairly diverse many different races are represented and there isn t one race that is dominant in the population It has a median household income of 52 639 and is predominantly non white with over half of residents identifying as Black or Asian Graphs included in this post were accessed from City Data com Zip codes have been removed to protect neighborhood privacy These are example neighborhoods and are not neighborhoods that we are researching Now take a look at the neighborhood that directly borders the previous one which we will call Neighborhood 2 It has a median household income of 94 276 and is nearly 75 white Neighborhood 2 Although these micro neighborhoods directly border each other they might normally function as separate entities entirely Residents might walk down different streets shop in different stores and remain generally unaware of each other s existence Racial segregation is fairly typical of urban environments in the United States where people of different racial backgrounds are often segregated into packets of a city that is otherwise considered to be diverse meaning fewer families actually live in mixed income neighborhoods and are therefore less likely to be exposed to people who are different from themselves This segregation can be disrupted when a person joins social networking websites like Nextdoor com Since early 2013 not only can Nextdoor users receive information generated from all people in their neighborhood but they can see and respond to posts in the Crime and Safety section of several nearby neighborhoods Pushing of the neighborhood boundaries amplifies the potential for users to participate in more heterogeneous communities but at the same time may increase the anxiety

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/blog (2016-04-02)
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  • CTSP | Apply
    to apply A UC Berkeley affiliation for one or more team members is an advantage but not a requirement We prefer that teams be located in the San Francisco Bay Area to be available for events and local collaborations Short term projects that can be completed within the 2015 2016 academic year are preferred about 6 months in length although longer projects are also acceptable Evaluation Criteria Project proposals will be evaluated for impact or their ability to advance the state of affairs in one or more focus area collaboration or their drawing of connections between individuals perspectives skill sets and or disciplines and reach or their relevance beyond purely academic audiences What to Submit Proposals will be submitted in two parts Part 1 De identified project proposal Please remove personally identifying information in this first part so that proposal review can be based on the quality of the project idea rather than the identities of those involved to the extent possible In about 2 pages please describe your project how long it will take how it addresses the chosen focus area s and the outcome s of your project No budget is desired unless your project requires additional funding beyond your combined 1 500 fellowships Details are useful but this isn t meant to be a formal NSF style proposal please be succinct Figures sketches hyperlinks and references are welcomed though not required and you can take an additional page or two to include these if necessary If you want to stretch the boundaries a bit you can also submit your application as a website or video But a boring old 2 page written proposal will be completely acceptable Part 2 Identified team description In one page please describe each member of your team their relevant skills and experiences and any skill s they hope to develop as a result of their work on the project Please also include what each team member proposes to contribute to the project and any interest they have in building the broader CTSP community for example by blogging or connecting people who should meet If any team member has experience in the public sphere blogging speaking disseminating ideas hosting events etc note that as well Please submit these two parts as separate PDFs Applications are currently closed FAQ Please reach out to us with any clarifying questions about the application process Below are a couple of questions that have come up more than once We ll add to these as necessary Q Can I be a part of more than one proposal Can my team submit more than one proposal Yes with a word of caution In general we want to be flexible and open to experimentation and a variety of potential collaborations We don t want to foreclose something that might be interesting That said focus on quality over quantity Submitting one clearly articulated proposal is a better strategy than submitting three vague ones Q Can I submit a proposal if I

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/apply (2016-04-02)
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  • CTSP | Privacy for Citizen Drones: Use Cases for Municipal Drone Applications
    Purposes Stakeholder Parks Dept Drone Project Lead After assembling the stakeholder group the Parks Dept drone project manager outlines the use case above adding the following relevant details During the twice daily drone flights at a specific park two municipal employees are working in the park One employee is clearing brush and debris from heavy seasonal winds Another is pruning the vegetation around walking paths The drone collects video focused on the health and structural integrity of trees as well as the proximity of any overhanging branches to walking paths The Parks Dept then defers to the privacy and data subject matter experts to highlight the potential legal and policy issues at stake Stakeholder Privacy Data Expert Legal Academic or Civil Society Privacy best practices usually dictate that data collected processed or stored be limited to that which is necessary for the specified purpose Here the Parks Dept s purpose is to detect changes in park features and vegetation that will allow the Parks Dept to better maintain the park The drone flight video and associated data will focus on the trees foliage and plant debris Unfortunately this video data will also unintentionally capture on occasion the two Parks Dept workers Perhaps there s a way to limit the collection of video data or secondary data on the Parks Dept employees Stakeholder Outsourced Video Processing Vendor At this point the external vendor that handles the processing of the video data helpfully chimes in The vendor can create a machine learning method that will recognize human faces and bodies and effectively blur them out of both the subsequently stored video and the data analytics report produced Problem solved the vendor says Stakeholder Privacy Data Expert Engineering Public Policy Academic The privacy academic pipes up That might not solve the problem the academic says Even if blurred because there are likely only a limited number of employees who would be performing a given task at a given date time and location it might be easy to cross reference the blurred images with other data and identify the Parks Dept gardener Even going beyond blurring and producing full redactions within the video data might be insufficient It would be safer to simply discard those portions of video data entirely and rely on the data reports Stakeholder Parks Dept Management One manager within the Parks Dept speaks up Why do we even care If we have Parks Dept employees in the video data that s not so bad We can monitor them while they work to see how hard they re really working Another manager responds That wasn t an approved purpose for the drone flights Plus we already have performance metrics that help assess employee productivity Stakeholder Union of Laborers Local 711 The representative from the Union Laborers Local 711 to which the two municipal workers belong adds that there are pre existing agreed upon policies around the privacy of their union members Especially since we haven t determined how this data might

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/privacy-for-citizen-drones-use-cases-for-municipal-drone-applications (2016-04-02)
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  • CTSP | Privacy for Citizen Drones: Privacy Policy-By-Design
    blanket whitelisting does accomplish is avoiding the admittedly difficult task of creating a policy framework to enable appropriate municipal drone use while preserving privacy But these are questions that need to be considered in order to move beyond the false binary dichotomy between privacy and municipal drone usage In short safeguarding privacy and enabling municipal innovation via new drone applications need not be mutually exclusive Privacy Policy By Design Our privacy policy by design approach considers and integrates privacy principles such as data minimization retention and onward transfer limits early in the development of drone law and policy Doing so will enable much like privacy by design theory in engineering contexts the creation of positive sum policy solutions Critical to a privacy policy by design approach is 1 identifying potential stakeholders both core and ancillary and 2 understanding how their particular interests play out By identifying a broad array of stakeholders including invested municipal agencies interdisciplinary academia industry and civil society organizations we hope to better understand how municipal drone use will impact the privacy interests of each stakeholder group Here privacy subject matter experts from interdisciplinary academia law public policy and information studies are critical to facilitate identification of potential issues both to represent the public at large and to assist other stakeholder groups which might not otherwise have the necessary expertise to fully assess their interests Oftentimes this approach will benefit from convening key stakeholders in a face to face roundtable setting especially those in other municipal departments and in groups outside municipal government altogether A series of such tabletop roundtables organized around likely use cases provides an opportunity for stakeholder groups to identify general privacy concerns as well as facilitate early development of creative and nuanced solutions between parties Once municipal departments gain a comprehensive understanding of general stakeholder concerns they can extrapolate those concerns for application in additional use cases and situations City governments do not have the time or resources to convene roundtables for the entire range of potential drone applications Nonetheless takeaways from the initial set of use cases can provide invaluable insight into the potential privacy concerns of external stakeholders helping avoid otherwise likely conflict in the future Understanding the multitude of privacy interests by different stakeholders is key to the creation of innovative positive sum solutions that safeguard privacy while enabling modern drone use in and by cities The following table represents a theoretical high level mapping of stakeholder concerns in the municipal drone space Evolving Data Driven Policy Finally it s important to realize that a privacy policy by design approach should not be pursued in isolation A growing fraction of recently proposed or enacted legislation has authorized the ancillary collection of relevant data around the new legislation itself creating opportunities in the future to further evolve policy via real world usage So too we propose that appropriate data collection modules be added to municipal drone use processes to confirm that established policies are creating the proper incentives and disincentives Our

    Original URL path: https://ctsp.berkeley.edu/privacy-for-citizen-drones-privacy-policy-by-design (2016-04-02)
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