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  • Intermediate filaments at the crossroad between health and disease | Department of Embryology
    Fan Publications Steven A Farber Publications Joseph G Gall Publications Former Lab Members Jeffrey Han Publications Marnie Halpern Publications Nick Ingolia Publications Christoph Lepper Allan Spradling Publications Frederick Tan Yixian Zheng Publications Research Programs Faculty Resources Seminars Outreach Contact Home Intermediate filaments at the crossroad between health and disease Event Dates June 3 2013 12 15pm 1 15pm John Eriksson PHD Department of Biosciences Åbo Akademi University Finland Host Yixian

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/event/intermediate-filaments-crossroad-between-health-and-disease (2013-06-13)
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  • admin's blog | Department of Embryology
    April 17 2013 10 29am Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog April 17 2013 7 45am Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog October 26 2012 2 55pm Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog October 16 2012 1 58pm Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog September 12 2012 10 33pm Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/blogs/admin (2013-06-13)
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  • Embryology Latest News | Department of Embryology
    Publications Joseph G Gall Publications Former Lab Members Jeffrey Han Publications Marnie Halpern Publications Nick Ingolia Publications Christoph Lepper Allan Spradling Publications Frederick Tan Yixian Zheng Publications Research Programs Faculty Resources Seminars Outreach Contact Home Embryology Latest News Latest news

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/node/574 (2013-06-13)
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  • Gall Symposium 2013 | Department of Embryology
    Gall Publications Former Lab Members Jeffrey Han Publications Marnie Halpern Publications Nick Ingolia Publications Christoph Lepper Allan Spradling Publications Frederick Tan Yixian Zheng Publications Research Programs Faculty Resources Seminars Outreach Contact Home Gall Symposium 2013 Event Dates April 12 2013

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/event/gall-symposium-2013 (2013-06-13)
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  • Joseph Gall 85th Birthday Symposium | Department of Embryology
    Allan Spradling Publications Frederick Tan Yixian Zheng Publications Research Programs Faculty Resources Seminars Outreach Contact Home Joseph Gall 85th Birthday Symposium a remarkable career with astonishing discoveries DATE April 12 14 2013 LOCATION Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Embryology Rose Auditorium PROGRAM Gall Symposium Program DIRECTIONS AND PARKING Directions and Parking ORGANIZERS Susan Gerbi Brown University Ji Long Liu Oxford University Zehra Nizami Carnegie Institution for Science Alison Singer

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/gall-symposium-2013 (2013-06-13)
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  • Blogs | Department of Embryology
    Original article blog April 17 2013 7 45am admin s blog Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog October 26 2012 2 55pm admin s blog Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog October 16 2012 1 58pm admin s blog Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article blog September 12 2012 10 33pm admin s blog Read more Feed Embryology Latest News Original article

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/blog (2013-06-13)
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  • Possible muscle disease therapeutic target found | Department of Embryology
    function is common in many mammals including cows sheep dogs humans and mice Mutant mice lacking in myostatin have muscle mass that is almost double that of normal mice This property is what makes it an attractive potential drug target By inhibiting myostatin a drug could in theory promote muscle growth even in a person with a muscular disease There has been considerable debate about which types of muscle cells are targeted by myostatin fibrous muscle cells called myofibers or muscle stem cells called satellite cells The satellite cells are activated by muscular injury begin to divide and fuse to myofibers Some studies seem to indicate myostatin targets satellite cells others indicate myofibers The research team co led by Fan and Se Jin Lee who is a former Carnegie Staff Associate and currently at Johns Hopkins University Medical School used a variety of techniques both genetic and pharmacological and determined that the muscle growth caused by inhibiting myostatin does not significantly involve the incorporation of satellite cells into myofibers This finding has major implications for the possible use of myostatin as a clinical target There are outstanding questions about how a drug designed to target myostatin would work in clinical conditions in which patient s satellite cells are depleted For example in diseases like muscular dystrophy satellite cells are believed to compensate for degenerated muscle cells in the early stages of the disease causing the pool of these stem cells to shrink over time This work raises the possibility that these patients might still benefit from myostatin inhibitors More work is needed to determine whether these findings are applicable to various clinical conditions such as exercise injury and sarcopenia degenerative loss of muscle mass associated with aging Fan said However our findings initially indicate that many different diseases affecting the

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/blog/possible-muscle-disease-therapeutic-target-found (2013-06-13)
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  • Studying fish to learn about fat | Department of Embryology
    absorptive cells of the intestine called enterocytes can take in critical nutrients One type of lipid cholesterol is known to impact a number of highly prevalent human diseases and is absorbed by enterocytes In zebrafish and humans newly absorbed cholesterol combines with proteins to form lipoproteins vehicles destined for the lymphatic system for subsequent distribution throughout the body In humans a protein called NPC1L1 short for Niemann Pick disease type C1 gene like 1 plays an important role in absorption by the enterocytes but how this protein facilitates cholesterol s journey through the cell is poorly understood Another lipid metabolic product called fatty acids are absorbed by these same cells Despite years of study the physiological process by which proteins mediate the initial steps of fatty acid uptake is unclear Once absorbed the fatty acids are converted to triacyglycerides fat and either prepared to be transported out of the cell or transformed into droplets of stored fat How these fat droplets form inside intestinal cells is not well understood These processes involving fatty acids triacyglycerides and cholesterol influence each other in poorly understood ways For example it has long been known that the presence of dietary fat increases dietary cholesterol absorption but the mechanism by which this occurs has not been determined Enter Farber and his team s new research tool They developed a method for using fluorescently glowing forms of lipids to observe fat and cholesterol absorption in the small intestines of live zebrafish Using this tool they were able to demonstrate the following The physiological processes regulating fatty acid absorption and cholesterol absorption are linked as was first suggested by studies involving rats in the 1960s A fatty acid called oleic acid can greatly increase the uptake of dietary cholesterol The subcellular location of the human protein NPC1L1

    Original URL path: http://emb.carnegiescience.edu/blog/studying-fish-learn-about-fat (2013-06-13)
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