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  • In Ghana, students witness challenges and diligence of developing nation — Carthage News — Carthage College
    and came home determined to continue on that path after graduation Tradition poses challenge Prof Geary who teaches in the Social Work Department said visits to facilities for special needs children illustrated the challenge of providing social services The class witnessed the clash between tradition and human rights Autism is heavily misunderstood in Ghana she said Local people do not understand it to be a disorder Rather they see the child as unnatural potentially due to the mother being involved in witchcraft Dedicated workers have made inroads but the shortage of resources saddened Dominic Maggiore 13 an accounting major from Grayslake Ill He said medicated eye drops for example could prevent many children from being disabled by a disease known as river blindness Mary Kate Brooks 14 works with students at the School for the Visually Impaired in Akropong Ghana Most children with visual impairment have river blindness a condition caused by infected water Although antibiotics often can prevent the condition the treatment is not available to many rural families The country definitely has potential for bigger things but I m happy I got to experience it the way we did and when we did he said I think we met some good people who are trying to make that difference in the country and it touched all of us The Carthage contingent pitched in toward that effort Mary Conner Menarek 13 a social work major from Burlington Wis said her group arranged for clothing and art supplies to be delivered to an orphanage and made tie dyed shirts with the orphans Already working as an intern for an earned release program at Robert E Ellsworth Correctional Center in Union Grove Wis she feels an even stronger pull to work as a counselor or social worker Religious roots The course counted as a Carthage Symposium a unique collaboration between faculty members of different disciplines that allows students to see issues through separate lenses Prof Musa who teaches in the Religion Department helped the students identify religious influences within the country Large numbers of both Christians and Muslims coexist there Hopefully they learned that in Africa religion permeates all aspects of life he said That quest provided some clues to the roots of African American religion The Carthage group visited a castle where captive slaves once were held before being shipped off to other parts of the world In journal entries students expressed disgust that church services once were held above the dungeon Caretakers of the monument closed the door allowing those in the group to envision what frightened slaves saw through a tiny slit If you asked the students they d have said we were in the room for 10 minutes Prof Geary said I don t think it was more than a minute An uplifting visit Besides being exposed to one of world history s biggest scars the class saw plenty of beauty Students enjoyed expansive views while hiking across the forest canopy and the women in the group

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/news/carthage/2013/02/21/in-ghana-students-witness-challenges-and-diligence-of-developing-nation/ (2013-06-13)
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  • J-Term class chooses beauty over noise — Carthage News — Carthage College
    ugly existence In a unique J Term class though the absence of chatter allowed students to focus on the beauty around them Titled Beauty Will Save the World explores the historical aesthetic moral and spiritual aspects of beauty This Carthage Symposium led by professors Stephanie Mitchell and Susanne Sklar is based on the famous quote by author Fyodor Dostoyevsky Students participate in loving kindness meditation throughout the course At their most recent visit to the DeKoven Center in Racine Wis they engaged in a spiritual retreat Students played a silent game of hide and seek and searched for their own thing of beauty Two members of the class shared their thoughts on the retreat Rebecca Peterson 13 a studio art major from O Fallon Ill spent some contemplative time in the woods on the DeKoven grounds It s hard to pinpoint where you start to see the beauty around you Rebecca said Once you ve settled into the silence and the feel of the place you notice it everywhere I wrote about the beauty of the trees and the tree bark You can see an amazing history in the lines of the tree once you sit to look at it It was definitely an interesting experience Lauren Smith 14 an elementary education major from Plainfield Ill found a thing of beauty in the Runcie Room A mantle there is engraved with the Latin phrase Vigeat Radix which translates to May the root thrive This was an eye opening experience Lauren said It allowed for me to absorb the beauty of not only silence but also some of the little things that I don t normally notice because I m too preoccupied with the conversation I m in or the conversations around me It really is an amazing experience to just

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/news/carthage/2013/01/17/j-term-class-chooses-beauty-over-noise/ (2013-06-13)
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  • J-Term 2012 — Features — Carthage College
    which courses are held both on campus and around the world Every J Term professors offer between 15 and 20 study tours to such destinations as Nicaragua Costa Rica Japan and Israel In recent years faculty have expanded their J Term offerings into the summer months offering J Term trips during May June and August There has been a true explosion of interest by faculty and students in study tours Prof Steege said Students come to college wanting more experiences abroad At the same time we have an increasingly internationally minded faculty Students must complete at least two J Term courses during their time at Carthage although most students choose to participate in J Term every year J Term is part of the tuition package Prof Steege said Students who go on a January study tour don t pay extra tuition they just pay the cost of the trip You ll hear Carthage students and faculty call January Term study tours J Term trips but they re really much more than that J Term study tours offer students a short term study abroad experience that they couldn t get by simply going on a trip Prof Steege said These are academic courses and they offer insights into an area s culture geography and experiences that people would never get on an ordinary trip It s four credits of intense academic work he continued Work is expected and students will be on site doing oral presentations and research Take the study tour Biodiversity Brains and Behavior a January 2012 and 2013 biology and neuroscience course team taught by Profs Scott Hegrenes and Daniel Miller in which students went scuba diving off Roatan Island We spent a week at Cocoa View one of the most unique resorts for diving in the world Prof Miller said But the trip wasn t all scuba and sunshine When we were diving we learned what it is that we were looking at and all of the different types of biodiversity the porifer the cnidaria the mollusca Prof Hegrenes said Students were well versed in each and every phylum of life This may be the one time in their lives that they ve ever taken a quiz in a nymphaeum Prof Seemee Ali Profs Seemee Ali and Michael McShane teamed up to teach Shakespeare in Rome for the second time during J Term 2012 Students read three of Shakespeare s most famous Roman plays before spending two weeks visiting locations in the city that are relevant to Shakespeare s work We wanted to show students the ways in which you can really understand a place through fictional works and particularly Shakespeare s plays because they give you bearing in a city that can feel overwhelming because of its history said Prof Ali assistant professor of Great Ideas and English Students on J Term study tours gain access to places and people most tourists don t get Students are going to Africa and talking to the minister of

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/features/jterm-2012/ (2013-06-13)
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  • Course Spotlight: Cryptography — Carthage News — Carthage College
    a Cryptography course are learning about the history of that long running battle and then taking sides in it Both sides Erik Tou Erik Tou an assistant professor of mathematics is offering the class for the second time It examines the use of ciphers along the way telling stories of the historical events they influenced That evolution begins with simple ciphers such as the Caesar Shift a technique the famous Roman ruler used to encrypt messages by shifting each letter three spots down the alphabet Today that would turn It s J Term into Lw v M Whup In World War II the Allies gained a substantial advantage by deciphering German communications sent via the Enigma machine For a timelier example Prof Tou points to the encryption methods used today to maintain Internet security Besides trying out these historical encryption methods on online simulators students are required to build their own ciphers and classmates attempt to crack them Prof Tou also issued a Cipher Challenge offering a prize to the student who is first to read nine messages encrypted with progressively more challenging methods Prof Tou s interest in the topic began in childhood with a code he and a friend created He debunks the myth rooted in movies and TV shows that the computer geek is able to break into the Department of Defense in 10 minutes That s not how reality works He also wants students to recognize how deeply involved cryptography is in daily life People generally consider online purchases to be safe he said even if they don t think about the encryption efforts employed against current and future threats We ve got really good ciphers doing the heavy lifting Prof Tou said and we don t have to worry about it anymore Read about all

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/news/carthage/2013/01/26/course-spotlight-cryptography/ (2013-06-13)
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  • 2012 Omrit excavation pierces mystery of ancient community — Carthage News — Carthage College
    28 to June 27 Previous excavations had participants uncovering remnants of an ancient Roman temple believed to be built in the first century B C E Having largely completed that work Prof Schowalter said this year s focus shifted to the surrounding area How they lived and worked Over the next five years researchers hope to learn more about how people lived and labored in that community which has been largely uninhabited since the 13 th century Walls and other structural remains found in the area suggest the buildings were residences or constructed for light industrial uses such as agricultural processing said Prof Schowalter who teaches religion and classics at Carthage Emily Prosch 13 a classical archaeology major from Boulder Colo said the highlight was finding a set of seven bronze coins Traveling to Omrit for the second straight year she served as an assistant leader for her team s 5 by 5 meter square It was fun to be able to teach people about field archaeology who had never been on a dig before especially since I was in their position last year Emily said Participants are divided into teams mixing students from Carthage Queens College Williams College and Duquesne University to expose them to new friendships and perspectives Overall 18 students performed the delicate work in challenging conditions Besides the coins notable discoveries included a ring featuring a stone that s possibly of German origin glass fragments nails a small bell and some small blades believed to be knives Related stories Three students presented findings from their Omrit research at an international poster conference Read more Two Carthage students stayed in the Middle East afterward to take advantage of unique opportunities Read more Along with an assistant leadership role in his team s square Edward Fernandez took photographs to document and catalog the finds With three visits to Omrit under his belt Edward 13 a classical archaeology major from Cicero Ill considers it an annual rite he can t live without Like the other returnees he cites the hands on experience and the strong bonds that are formed I love to dig and it just fills me with excitement whenever I do because I know if I continue digging I ll eventually find something amazing Edward said Building leaders Carthage began sending students to Omrit in 2004 and continues to have a leadership role in the project Maggie Knowles plans to be there for a fourth time next year I keep going back because it s the highlight of my year and the leadership opportunities available at Omrit are unmatched said Maggie 13 a classical archaeology major from Lockport Ill For an undergraduate to be a square leader is basically unheard of on any other dig When they re not occupied on site the group visits other historical religious and political sites in northern Israel Tack on personal access to experts in the field of archaeology and she s hooked Madeline Smith 15 a French and International Political

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/news/carthage/2012/08/08/2012-omrit-excavation-pierces-mystery-of-ancient-community/ (2013-06-13)
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  • Students learn to tilt life's odds in their favor — Carthage News — Carthage College
    hold onto for the hand of life As the title of the January Term course implies students in Strategic Interaction of Gambling in Popular Books and Film analyze movies and read about pool hustling poker and other kinds of bets But rest assured moms and dads what they learn about strategic interaction can be utilized in many other ways The class is centered on the writings of sociologist Erving Goffman He taught that people wear different figurative masks tailoring what information they give both verbally and nonverbally to the specific setting One of those masks according to Prof Miller is worn when gambling Gamblers skills extend beyond learning which hands to raise or fold They learn to read people and the cues they give off said Prof Miller who teaches sociology and criminal justice If students can refine that skill and identify what messages they re giving others Prof Miller said they ll have a leg up on anything from a first date to a job interview That is a transferable skill into your personal and professional life that you can carry with you forever he said Although the public policy aspects of gambling have been thoroughly researched and debated Prof Miller said he s drawn to the strategic interplay between the gamblers themselves A regular at the poker tables he is attuned to those cues Often messages are relayed unintentionally he said such as when a fellow player divulges what he or she does for a living That can indicate whether the player is conservative or risky with his bets he said He also remembered a hand in which he correctly determined an opponent was bluffing simply because the man s stacks of chips were disorganized This is the first offering of the Strategic Interaction course Prof Miller said

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/news/carthage/2012/01/24/students-learn-to-tilt-lifes-odds-in-their-favor/ (2013-06-13)
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  • Physics Department News — Physics and Astronomy at Carthage — Carthage College
    jobs and graduate school positions more Faculty Achievements Carthage welcomes three new faculty members Carthage welcomes three new faculty members expanding the College s expertise in finance economics experimental physics and philosophy more UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH Student Spotlight Meet the 2012 SURE researchers Thirty six Carthage students are on campus this summer conducting research with their professors as part of the 2012 Summer Undergraduate Research Program more Alumni Achievements From the Carthage Microgravity Team to the International Space Station Carthage alumna Samantha Kreppel Alberts 10 continues her NASA work as a graduate student at Purdue Read the article more NASA RESEARCH Students knowledge skyrockets after workshop at NASA facility Team from Carthage completes RockOn workshop at NASA s Wallops Flight Facility constructing a payload for a suborbital rocket flight more Presentation features Carthage students latest research with NASA The Carthage Microgravity Team will present findings from its latest research project with NASA on May 8 at the Kemper Center in Kenosha more Undergraduate Research Carthage students fly with NASA The Carthage Microgravity Team conducted research for NASA aboard a zero gravity aircraft See photos and video more Undergraduate Research Carthage Microgravity Team conducts research for NASA Follow the team online as they travel to the Johnson Space Center and Ellington Field in Houston before taking flight in zero g more Carthage Microgravity Team featured in The Journal Times Carthage students continue NASA work to measure fuel levels in space Read the article in The Journal Times Racine Wis more Recognized for Excellence Researchers visit Carthage to study best practices in physics education The American Institute of Physics has recognized the Carthage Physics Department for its high graduation and career placement rates Researchers seek to share program s success with other institutions more SURE 2012 SURE program seeks applicants Students are invited

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/physics/news/ (2013-06-13)
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  • A Word From the Department — Physics and Astronomy at Carthage — Carthage College
    Universities of Wisconsin Madison and Minnesota others become middle and high school physics teachers with certification through the Early Adolescence and Adolescence Education Minor offered in the Education Department Still others pursue a concentration in astrophysics or a Climatology and Meteorology Minor with Geography and Earth Science Our mission is to provide all our students with an education they will value and keep using long after graduation as they face the challenges of the workplace and become productive citizens Our hidden physicist graduates include teachers doctors engineers software technicians scientists consultants lawyers businesspeople start up entrepreneurs writers and military servicemen and women Learn more about careers that have begun with a degree in physics Carthage physics students learn how to understand the physical world and describe it quantitatively think critically and express themselves coherently analyze problems and find versatile ways to solve them This emphasis on problem solving and flexible thinking is essential for today s graduates who may ultimately hold several quite different jobs during the course of their working years Our faculty members advise students individually about choosing their coursework and seeking that first job or internship and identify workplace opportunities for them after graduation The department serves more than 60 physics majors about equally divided between men and women which is several times the national average for a school of our size Our students enjoy a challenging interactive and nurturing environment with an active Society of Physics Students SPS Chapter that has twice been recognized as one of the outstanding SPS chapters in the nation I invite you to learn more about our department and program of study by exploring the links found here and by contacting me or any other faculty member I trust you will find your virtual visit exciting and hope you will come

    Original URL path: http://community.carthage.edu/physics/message/ (2013-06-13)
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