archive-edu.com » EDU » C » CASE.EDU

Total: 920

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • CWRU philosopher examines the hypothesis vs. exploratory funding divide | think:blog
    application is driven by a strong solid hypothesis with clear research objectives The specific aims are a formal statement of objectives and milestones of the research project towards testing the hypothesis The article offers two explanations why the NIH prefers hypothesis testing The research is driven by best practices how to do and test science and it s easy for peer reviewers to separate good from bad science based on the research methods Those with a realistic chance to prove what they set out to find and have the biggest impact for the public s benefit tend to receive the federal research dollars Haufe concludes With hypothesis testing researchers present what the study hopes to accomplish how it will be done and possible outcomes Many researchers also conduct pilot studies or draw from findings by other researchers to build a strong case for future success Exploratory research however is driven more by hope and chance of discovery Haufe writes Funding success also tends to take the path of least risk Haufe explains Hypothesis testing takes the next step in scientific theory having already stood the rigors of examination Meanwhile exploratory research examines unknown areas with no or little known theories to back them perceived as a riskier bet Haufe said the federal government with limited funding wants to support research where there s a chance of success that serves both public and science interests The closer the research is to what s already known also improves chances of funding he reports The science community has long accepted hypothesis testing More than 50 years ago British philosopher Karl Popper became known for his ideas that good science involved testing to determine validity Haufe said hypothesis testing now has become a standard when evaluating research proposals Still Haufe does not want to

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/27/cwru_philosopher_examines_the_hypothesis_vs_exploratory_funding_divide (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive


  • CWRU Law Professor Helps Plan Tribunal to Prosecute Perpetrators of Atrocities in Syria | think:blog
    potential criminal liability and lay the groundwork for justice rather than revenge in the immediate aftermath of transition The National Press Club program is free and open to the press and public Congressional hearings are possible soon to consider U S Rep Chris Smith s concurrent resolution on establishing accountability for war crimes and crimes against humanity in Syria Smith R New Jersey recommends establishing an international tribunal to prosecute top Syrian figures The blue ribbon panel s draft statute recommends an internationalized domestic tribunal to prosecute the culpable civilian and military leaders The proposal to establish a Syria tribunal reflects insights gained from a series of meetings and workshops over the past two years led by the Public International Law Policy Group an NGO non governmental organization co founded by Scharf and Williams which brought together Syrian lawyers jurists and civil society leaders with international experts to discuss transitional justice in Syria It also reflects comments received from the distinguished members of our expert drafting committee Scharf said The Public International Law and Policy Group recently posted the Syria Tribunal Statute Here is a link http publicinternationallawandpolicygroup org wp content uploads 2013 09 Chautauqua Blueprint1 pdf Reporters and editors note Michael Scharf is available at 216 534 7796 cell David Crane is available at 571 331 5361 cell The members of the Blue Ribbon Panel are M Cherif Bassiouni Emeritus Professor of Law at DePaul University and former Chairman of the Drafting Committee of the United Nations Diplomatic Conference on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court David Crane Professor Syracuse University College of Law and former Chief Prosecutor of the Special Court for Sierra Leone Sir Desmond de Silva QC former Chief Prosecutor of the Special Court for Sierra Leone Mark Ellis Executive Director of the International Bar Association Justice Richard Goldstone former Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa and former Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda Larry Johnson Adjunct Professor at Columbia Law School former U N Assistant Secretary General for Legal Affairs who drafted the Statutes for the Yugoslavia Tribunal the Cambodia Tribunal and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon Gregory Noone Director of the Fairmont State University National Security and Intelligence Program and Assistant Professor of Political Science and Law and former head of the International Law Branch in the International and Operational Law Division at the Pentagon Michael Newton Professor Vanderbilt University Law School and former Deputy to the Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues U S Department of State William Schabas Professor Middlesex University Faculty of Law and former Member of the International Truth Commission for Sierra Leone Michael Scharf Associate Dean Case Western Reserve University School of Law Managing Director of the Public International Law Policy Group and former Attorney Adviser for United Nations Affairs U S Department of State Paul Williams President of the Public International Law Policy Group and Rebecca Grazier Professor of Law and International Relations American University In addition

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/26/cwru_law_professor_helps_plan_tribunal_to_prosecute_perpetrators_of_atrocities_in_syria (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Defying the Global Language offers new perspectives on Ethnic Studies | think:blog
    Like other disciplines that change with time Toman discusses how ethnic studies has evolved in the United States from focusing on Americans with roots in Asia Africa or Latin American countries to much broader perspectives and voices Language here is defined in the broadest sense as shown by Bates College assistant professor Theri Alyce Pickens essay The Question of Having a Body in Ethnic Studies Toman said the essays also demonstrate how ethnicity to Americans takes on different meanings for people in other countries like Africa where ethnic or religious differences can influence languages Her book is among the few that stray from concentrating on influences of an individual language to provide this broader scope of the field s current research An essay about an African comic book by Julia diLiberti from the College of DuPage in Illinois is an example Toman said Five of the seven essays were inspired by conversations among intellectuals and writers analyzed in papers presented in an American Comparative Literature Association seminar in 2009 at Harvard University that Toman and Gilbert led The book Toman said continues those conversations and makes them available to other scholars Louis Yapo University of Abidjan and State University of New York at Albany provides an example of how native languages influence prominent ones in his essay French as an Assaulted Language He discusses how African literature such as Ahmadou Kourouma s novel Les soleils des indépendances The Suns of Independence has incorporated words now accepted into the French language Other essays examine Chinese Americanness by Anastasia Wright Turner Indian womanhood in novels by Anita Baksh University of Maryland College Park and defiant language in Martinican novels by Elisabeth M Lore University of California at Davis After several years of compiling the work and editing the submission Toman said the

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/26/defying_the_global_language_offers_new_perspectives_on_ethnic_studies (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Historian’s new book chronicles London’s political struggle to deliver water | think:blog
    consequences when they failed They did not even experience consequences in the marketplace since each company only supplied one region of London the companies had negotiated local monopolies amongst themselves But how to solve this problem Many other cities in Britain managed to buy out their old water companies or create new public utilities in the period But London was different London actually had no single government for most of the nineteenth century It had grown so explosively that it absorbed myriad preexisting towns and jurisdictions The metropolitan area therefore did not have one governing body it had scores Finally near the end of the nineteenth century London did receive the sort of administrative body that could takeover the city s water supply That is when the fight began in earnest A highly active reforming party quickly gained preeminence in London s new government And that worried conservatives on the national government level They believed that London would not stop by seizing its water supply that would only be the beginning of a total socialist takeover of the cities utilities and services its gas supply transport electricity Water was not just water Why not conservatives argued let private enterprise provide the water supply If services were poor find solutions that did not include a government takeover They obstructed every move London made to offer a municipal water supply In the case of London climate intervened to force the issue in the last years before the twentieth century A series of droughts and resulting water shortages so incensed Londoners that conservatives faced an electoral revolt if they did not stop their obstruction But it was key for conservatives to keep water out of London s hands Their answer was to create a board or trust to oversee a metropolitan water utility

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/25/historianas_new_book_chronicles_londonas_political_struggle_to_deliver_water (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Parental stress of caring for a chronically ill child can affect all family members, finds Case Western Reserve researchers | think:blog
    this was among the first to integrate those findings into a single report to provide a broad view of the issue and potential interventions said Melissa Cousino lead author and a graduate student in the Department of Psychological Sciences In addition to identifying common stress triggers parents also need help coping with the strain report Cousino and co author Rebecca Hazen psychologist and assistant professor from the Department of Pediatrics at the university According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 15 percent of U S families have a chronically ill child with special needs The researchers found that the demands of care created greater stress than the severity or length of their child s illness In addition to usual parenting responsibilities parents of chronically ill children deal with special needs such as doctor or therapy appointments medical treatments hospitalizations and school issues that can be overwhelming while trying to integrate the sick child s needs into the family routine Parents reported suffering added stress from watching their child in pain and from worrying about the child s vulnerability and explaining the health problems to those outside the family Parenting stress can be intervened upon the researchers said Hazen provided the following tips on reducing parenting stress Be open to assistance from friends or family who may be able to help reduce some of the stress To decrease the demands on one parent parents should find ways to share parenting and treatment responsibilities Let your child s doctor know if you think you may need help in managing the stress related to caring for a child with a chronic illness print e mail feeds connect Get in touch with Case Western Reserve University s media relations team Contact information photos news releases and more are available on our site

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/18/parental_stress_of_caring_for_a_chronically_ill_child_can_affect_all_family_members_finds_case_western_reserve_researchers (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Signal gradients in 3-D guide stem cell behavior | think:blog
    to change into the different kinds of cells to form tissues where you need them In their first test the researchers found that stem cells changed into cartilage or bone cells in the directions of two opposing soluble growth factor gradients one that promotes cartilage called TGF beta 1 and another that promotes bone called BMP 2 The stem cells were placed in a solution of modified alginate a material derived from seaweed that can form a jello like material called a hydrogel when exposed to low level ultraviolet light The solution was divided between two computer controlled syringe pumps with BMP 2 in one syringe and TGF beta 1 in the other By controlling the rate of injection with the pumps and using a mixing unit a hydrogel with a BMP 2 gradient starting with a large amount and tapering to nearly none and an opposing TGF beta 1 gradient from low to high was formed The hydrogels were further modified in such a way that the growth factors were retained for a longer period of time This enabled prolonged exposure of stem cells to the growth factors and further control over their differentiation into bone or cartilage cells The researchers then modified the hydrogel with a gradient of adhesion ligands molecular strings that allow the stem cells to attach to the hydrogel itself After two weeks of culturing the cells they found the highest number of cells in the hydrogel region where the concentration of ligands was highest In a third test they created a gradient of crosslink density within the hydrogels Crosslinks provide structure to the gels The lower the density the more flexible the hydrogel the higher the stiffer the gel After two weeks more cells were found in the most flexible gel regions within the

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/18/signal_gradients_in_3d_guide_stem_cell_behavior (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Case Western Reserve’s Weatherhead School of Management Creates First Department of Design & Innovation | think:blog
    and creating it he said Henry Mintzberg of McGill University in Montreal who is frequently ranked among the world s most important business management scholars will present the keynote address at the Weatherhead School s introduction of the new department on Sept 27 The new department is built on the recognition that all aspects of an organization from vision strategy and operations to the development of new products and services are designed The most successful businesses are created and driven by design that goes beyond best practices or merely imitating what others are doing explained Fred Collopy professor of Design Innovation and the Weatherhead School s vice dean To inspire his students to think more broadly for example Collopy invites practitioners from outside typical business circles product designers choreographers architects to explain and demonstrate the creative problem solving process they experience Almost to a person they don t settle for the first idea they get They ask themselves How do we go beyond what we and others have tried so far Collopy said There s a lesson in here for business people Weatherhead s new department expands its global reputation for providing students with the expertise of faculty who teach such cutting edge management concepts as emotional intelligence appreciative inquiry and sustainable value Recently Distinguished Professor of Organizational Behavior Richard Boyatzis attracted more than 90 000 people from 188 countries for his course on Inspiring Leadership Through Emotional Intelligence Weatherhead s first free massive open online course or MOOC The new Design Innovation Department combines faculty from the former Marketing and Policy Studies and Information Systems departments The new department is one of six at the Weatherhead School the others are Accountancy Banking Finance Economics Operations and Organizational Behavior Among other skills students enrolled in the new department s curriculum will learn To develop new products and techniques of invention and discovery that lead to designing an organization in new ways New skills of entrepreneurship from technological ideas generated in the colleges of engineering and medicine How to competitively position organizations as well as strategic planning techniques based on customer research To map customer experience that leads to improving the quality of an organization s services The new department s progressive curriculum will serve not only to educate students but also bolster the entrepreneurial talent base and culture of innovation in the region said Joseph Jankowski the university s chief innovation officer Students in the design lab at Weatherhead where teams use new techinques to discover innovative ideas are about to get busier Buchanan said For example students will learn to apply design to better serve a client or customer through involvement with various local businesses and institutions such as the Cleveland Clinic Marriott Corp and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History Faculty within the new department will focus on imparting knowledge to develop organizational leaders and entrepreneurs design strategies and operational systems and new products and services We ve spent three years discussing what we have in common what

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/17/case_western_reserveas_weatherhead_school_of_management_creates_first_department_of_design_innovation (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Chuck and Char Fowler Give $6 Million for Fowler Family Fellows | think:blog
    entrepreneurship and sustainable value Weatherhead and the Center since have launched an academic track in sustainable value for MBA students and the center also offers consulting and other assistance to firms and organizations that wish to pursue sustainability action plans The new Fowler Fellows program will engage MBA students in researching and writing about successful efforts to apply sustainable value The process will provide invaluable learning for students and also add to the center s store of meaningful teaching cases for students at universities around the globe Weatherhead forecasts enrolling five to eight exceptional Fowler Family Fellows per year and will provide them financial support equal to about half of tuition costs The prestige of the designation coupled with the opportunity to reduce education expenses provides an opportunity to make Weatherhead increasingly competitive overall in the MBA marketplace while at the same time expanding the impact of the Fowler Center s work Business definitely is the agent of world benefit Chuck Fowler said We need to be able to get that word out to the world Fowler a 1990 graduate of the school s Executive MBA program studied with Cooperrider during his graduate business program and found the concepts presented so compelling that he began applying them within his own company Over the years Fairmount has held both modest and massive gatherings of employees dedicated to collective imagining of best futures Cooperrider developed the model for such positive strengths based conversations known as Appreciative Inquiry During one such summit that Cooperrider led in 2005 more than 200 Fairmount employees embraced the ideal of sustainable value One of the aspirations they identified then was achieving zero waste This summer Fairmount announced that six of its facilities had achieved that goal for 2012 The company also cut 6 2 million in fuel

    Original URL path: http://blog.case.edu/think/2013/09/13/chuck_and_char_fowler_give_6_million_for_fowler_family_fellows (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •