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  • Writing for the Web
    the Web This collection of resources is designed to support and help writers who want to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Peer review Show Descriptions Writing Guides Peer Review Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web site supported by Colorado State University Content

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=70 (2015-10-15)
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  • Myths and Realities
    Respond Designing Writing Assignments Commenting Margins and End Commenting on Drafts Rubrics Helping Students Learn Editing Helping Students Learn to Fix Errors Overview of Rhetorical Context Discipline Specific Resources Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Myths and Realities Commenting on student writing is time consuming and often frustrating Some of my worst moments as a teacher happened when I gave back student papers watched students flip to the grade and then saw students drop the papers into the wastebasket on the way out of the classroom One of the grim realities of teaching through our writing assignments is that we cannot guarantee that students will take the time to learn from our comments about their writing But we need to try to maximize our effectiveness as teachers responding to writing so that we have the best chance to engage students attention on our commentary Dispelling some myths about grading papers seems like the best place to begin boosting teacher effectiveness Myth 1 Grading papers means marking all the grammatical errors Myth 2 Teachers need to be experts in writing to comment helpfully on papers Myth 3 Commenting on papers has to take hours of my time Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/commenting/myths.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • When Not to Respond
    to write simply because they don t have time to respond to every piece of writing But please remember that sometimes the writing itself simply having students think through an idea on paper is the whole point of the activity These writing to learn activities are geared toward students needs to articulate concepts they ve just read or heard about to critique a point of view to clarify their thinking to challenge an idea I ve described a range of writing to learn activities elsewhere but let me just note a few here Asking students at the end of a lecture to summarize the most important new idea presented in that lecture Asking students to sketch the class for a student who missed class that day Asking students what most confused you in today s class Each of these two minute writing opportunities can help students learn Teachers don t need to write responses to these kinds of writing That s not to say that you might not want to read this writing Skimming through a set of responses to what most confused you in today s class could help you plan the next class session You might even want

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/commenting/notrespond.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Designing Writing Assignments
    Page Authors Contributors Designing Writing Assignments Good or at least readable student writing starts with a good assignment Walking into class and announcing that a 10 page research paper is due at the final class won t get you good student writing Any time you spend preparing a good writing assignment will save you time when you start to respond to the final products Start by thinking about your goals for the assignment What do you want students to learn by doing the task Will they engage an idea you ve raised explore a connection between the theoretical and practical report on field research summarize professional readings on the topic Or is your goal to determine how much students have learned about the concepts you ve presented in lectures Or perhaps you have one of many other possible goals in mind Be as specific as you can be about what you want this writing task to do for you and for your students as the first step in your process To see more about examining goals as the starting point for designing writing assignments see http wac colostate edu aw teaching kiefer2000 htm Specifically think in more detail about these

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/commenting/mousetrap.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Commenting in the Margins and at the End of the Paper
    Specific Resources Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Commenting in the Margins and at the End of the Paper Although you may not have time to write very many comments even a few specific comments in the margins about what the student does particularly well or where the student needs to concentrate on specific strategies for the next paper will make your end comments more helpful for students Follow the links below for additional pointers to make margin and end comments more useful for students but less burdensome for you Strategies For Commenting In The Margins Of Student Papers Insight from a Colleague Strategies For Commenting At The End Of Student Papers Insight from a Colleague In Brief Insight from a Colleague If however you think you might have more than a few minutes per paper to give feedback to students then other strategies are likely to be more helpful The following sections set out advice from a variety of composition teachers about both their process of commenting and their focus in commenting on student writing More Suggestions from Experienced Teachers of Composition Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Begin Concentrate on Key Strategies for End Comments Strategies For Making Your

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/commenting/commenting.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Commenting on Drafts Rather Than Final Products
    on Drafts Rather Than Final Products Commenting happens on drafts as well as on final products The best commenting takes account of where students are in their drafting revising process and is an opportunity to actively continue the teaching process A combination of notes both in the margins and at the end of students papers gives students both big picture feedback about what works well in the paper and specific

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/commenting/draft.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Rubrics for Commenting and Grading
    allow teachers who might not otherwise assign writing to do so And simply by writing more students do improve over time Like any other physical and cognitive skill practice with writing does improve performance over time So if a rubric will allow you to have students write then by all means use a rubric You ll find however that a carefully designed rubric will give you much more payback for time invested than a rubric that isn t as detailed or as clearly articulated The following sections define the key components of rubrics and collect advice from various sources about the best ways to develop effective rubrics What Makes an Effective Rubric Rubric for Conducting an Experiment in the Lab Grading Rubric for Metamorphosis Paper Scoring Rubric for Projects Consulting Style Reports and Reports on Technical Topics The Differences between Rubrics for Holistic Scoring and for Analytic Response Holistic Scoring in More Detail CSU Composition Exam Grading Guide Analytic Scoring in More Detail Sample With No Individual Comment Sample With Individual Comment Critiquing a Sample Rubric A Process for Designing a Helpful Rubric List key elements to assess Refine your list after you define the criteria as concretely as possible

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/commenting/rubrics.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Helping Students Understand the Importance of Careful Editing
    Errors Overview of Rhetorical Context Discipline Specific Resources Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Helping Students Understand the Importance of Careful Editing One of the most common responses to the question Why did you give me a paper so full of mistakes is this You re the teacher you HAVE to read the paper Sadly students often see teachers as a captive audience who will just put up with whatever text flows from the keyboard or pen Most students can edit their papers and they often believe that editing doesn t matter so they don t take the time to do it Or they wait too long to finish a paper and don t have time to edit Sometimes the biggest part of the problem is getting students attention focused on editing Teachers who don t want to be distracted by proofreading errors or relatively simple editorial glitches report that the number of errors diminishes quickly when 10 20 of a final grade is based on editing But if you don t like carrying such a big stick then a couple of other strategies might help you get cleaner papers with few editing and proofreading problems Set up a Professional Audience

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/commenting/helping.cfm (2015-10-15)
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