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  • Chat Room Considerations
    those taught in a computer classroom If you re teaching in a traditional classroom you need to think about logistics When will all of your students be able to log into a chat room You might break them into groups and have each group decide when they ll meet Also consider whether chat rooms are more beneficial than simply getting together or talking over the phone If you don t have a goal for using chat you might decide that traditional means for discussion are more convenient Often students complain that chats are overcrowded and that comments get lost in strings of confusion For this reason you might create several smaller chat groups and have them meet in different rooms A useful feature of some chat rooms is the ability to save threads of conversation Since chats are informal students tend to have difficulty staying on task Chat rooms become a space to hang out in especially if the instructor isn t involved Also you may run into students who offer unprofessional or offensive comments To help prevent this establish class rules for participating in chat before you assign it Some instructors like students to use pseudonyms when they re

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/onlinediscussions/considerations.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Small Group Discussions
    Page Authors Contributors Small Group Discussions Small group discussions are ideal for workshops and group projects If you re asking students to collaborate on research or writing group discussions provide an electronic space where group members can meet Students often find it difficult to coordinate their schedules with their peers when working on a project Through online group discussion members can exchange ideas between classes without having to meet face

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/onlinediscussions/small.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • How to Set Up Small Group Discussions Online
    Uses Benefits Considerations Small Group Discussions How To A Final Thought Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors How to Set Up Small Group Discussions Online To set up online groups for your class log onto your SyllaBase class home page see How to Login to Our Class Web Forum on SyllaBase for instructions Then Click on the gray Admin button in the left column Click on class groups From the class groups page click on the add group button Type in the group name and description optional Scroll down and look to see that all students are listed in a box waiting for you to place them in a group Keep in mind that you ll need to enter students names into your class roster before the names will appear in the box After you ve completed a group click on submit After adding students to a group you can then assign the group to discussion forums file sharing archives and real time chat rooms assigning groups is done in each tool s admin page These groups also appear on your email page To learn more about this feature click on the help button at the top of the class groups

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/onlinediscussions/howto.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • A Final Thought about Online Discussions
    Lists Private Public Discussion Forums Post Edit Reply Uses Benefits Considerations Chat Rooms Uses Benefits Considerations Small Group Discussions How To A Final Thought Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors A Final Thought about Online Discussions Like all classroom activities online discussion requires some forethought but most instructors find the benefits to communicating beyond the classroom are invaluable Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/onlinediscussions/final.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Print-Friendly Page
    To Edit a Message Click on your posted message Then click on the green Edit button on the top of the screen After you ve made changes to your text scroll down and click on the Submit button To Reply to a Message When you are reading a message you ll notice a purple Reply button on the top of the screen Click on Reply type your message and then click on the Submit button at the bottom of the screen Discussion Forum Uses Continue a class discussion when you run out of time Have students generate ideas on a topic or on a reading that you will address in class Build community by creating an informal discussion space where students can raise questions and exchange thoughts throughout the semester Rants Rambles and Responses or whatever you d like to call it Ask students to post their writing to a discussion forum and have other students read and reply to it This usually works best when each student reads the entry above and below their own so everyone receives feedback Discussion Forum Benefits You can read comments fairly quickly and validate them to show students you re invested in their ideas You can refer to points made on the forums in class to enrich discussion and to acknowledge thoughtful ideas You can save a thread of a discussion to use as a writing sample or model Discussion forums give quiet students another outlet for sharing ideas Students learn to value revision when they receive comments on their writing from their peers Discussion Forum Considerations You ll want to find out if students have access to computers outside of class before requiring that work is completed on online Decide how you ll evaluate writing on discussion forums as class participation as homework If you don t provide incentive for using the forum fewer students will write substantial comments Know that some students may lose sight of the academic context and offer inappropriate comments on the forum For example a student may use the class forum as a way to express criticisms of the course when he she should address such concerns with you in a less public context Be sure to establish appropriate guidelines for using discussion forums Also inform students of any expectations you have Chat Rooms Chat rooms attract grammar rebels and boy band fan clubs but they may have earned their place in the writing classroom as well A chat room is a space where a group of writers meet to carry on conversation Unlike discussion forums that allow a writer time to compose his her thoughts chat rooms demand a writer s constant attention to a thread of ongoing discussion much like a conversation Instructors use chat rooms mainly to engage students thoughts on a topic and to generate ideas for writing While chat rooms typically do not lend themselves to polished writing they encourage participation and can aid in the development of ideas Chat Room Uses

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/onlinediscussions/printformat.cfm?printformat=yes (2015-10-15)
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  • Contributors to this Guide
    to Login Mailing Lists Private Public Discussion Forums Post Edit Reply Uses Benefits Considerations Chat Rooms Uses Benefits Considerations Small Group Discussions How To A Final Thought Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Contributors to this Guide Content Development Kerri Eglin HTML Coding Jill Salahub Design and ColdFusion Programming Mike Palmquist Jill Salahub Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web site supported

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/onlinediscussions/contrib.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing for the Web
    designed to support and help writers who want to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Considering Purposes for Writing Show Descriptions Writing Guides Understanding Your Purpose Writing Activities Analyzing a Written Text Purpose Context Rhetorical Analysis Motivation Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=21 (2015-10-15)
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  • An Introduction to Content Analysis
    Commentary Issues of Reliability Validity Advantages of Content Analysis Disadvantages of Content Analysis Examples Annotated Bibliography Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Content Analysis An Introduction to Content Analysis Content analysis is a research tool used to determine the presence of certain words or concepts within texts or sets of texts Researchers quantify and analyze the presence meanings and relationships of such words and concepts then make inferences about the messages within the texts the writer s the audience and even the culture and time of which these are a part Texts can be defined broadly as books book chapters essays interviews discussions newspaper headlines and articles historical documents speeches conversations advertising theater informal conversation or really any occurrence of communicative language Texts in a single study may also represent a variety of different types of occurrences such as Palmquist s 1990 study of two composition classes in which he analyzed student and teacher interviews writing journals classroom discussions and lectures and out of class interaction sheets To conduct a content analysis on any such text the text is coded or broken down into manageable categories on a variety of levels word word sense phrase sentence or

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1305&guideid=61 (2015-10-15)
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