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  • Showing Trends, Patterns, Relationships
    Charts Tables Figures Drawings Pictures Models Using Overheads Overhead Integration Checklist Rehearsal Checklist Presentation Tips Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Creating and Using Overheads Showing Trends Patterns Relationships I f you want your audience to gain a clear understanding of trends patterns or relationships in your data consider using a chart For instance suppose roller blading on campus has increased by 30 over the past two

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=711&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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  • Show Precise Data Clearly
    Using Overheads Overhead Integration Checklist Rehearsal Checklist Presentation Tips Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Creating and Using Overheads Show Precise Data Clearly I f you need your audience to follow you through a detailed numerical analysis consider using tables Suppose you need to convey that 20 of students on campus drive cars to school 20 walk 10 roller blade 30 bike 10 skateboard and another 10

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=712&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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  • Providing Special Emphasis
    Overheads Overhead Integration Checklist Rehearsal Checklist Presentation Tips Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Creating and Using Overheads Providing Special Emphasis L eaf through any magazine and image after image leaps out at you Advertisers know the right visuals will attract readers You should incorporate visuals into your presentation to spark your audience s interest Let them see what you are talking about Consider using iconic visual

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=713&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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  • Educate Your Audience
    Overheads Educate Your Audience A n important consideration in creating overheads is educating your audience What you include will depend on who your audience is Questions to Access Your Audience Ask yourself the following questions to analyze your audience Does your audience know the jargon and or technical terms of your topic This will help you decide how intricate your visuals can be A figure versus a picture can make a big difference in audience comprehension What does your audience know about your topic You may have to provide some background information about your topic or perhaps you can assume a certain knowledge level What are your audience s attitudes toward your topic You may need to captivate them into your topic with simple visuals to make your presentation appealing or perhaps you need to use more technical visuals for credibility How will the information from your presentation be used Your information may be used to make a decision or the audience may be tested on the material Audience Pointers Various audiences have particular needs however here are some important considerations Audiences generally have a recall of seven This means you should never introduce more than seven concepts per visual

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=714&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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  • Considering the Basic Design
    About this Guide Contributors Citation Creating and Using Overheads Considering the Basic Design Y ou ll want your visuals to be as effective as possible This portion of the unit reviews when and how you should use a visual aid It will instruct you on creating a storyboard and formatting your visuals Details such as color scheme and text readability are discussed After you have outlined your presentation you will

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=715&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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  • Using Storyboards
    Using Storyboards General Formatting Guidelines Effective Use of Color Choosing Types of Visuals Charts Tables Figures Drawings Pictures Models Using Overheads Overhead Integration Checklist Rehearsal Checklist Presentation Tips Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Creating and Using Overheads Using Storyboards A storyboard is a working paper it helps you design your visuals and key points To create a storyboard you can use pieces of paper or presentation software You ll need to draw two boxes one for your visual and one for the accompanying text Remember to write down the section of your report or paper on each board so you can easily locate the information later Consider these pointers while creating your storyboard Write down key points ideas concepts under consecutive storyboard frames Make rough sketches of visuals for each frame Don t worry about polish at this point you just want the idea of the visual clearly portrayed Read your presentation while looking at the storyboard and complete the storyboard checklist Storyboard Checklist Does my visual clearly display one key idea from my presentation Is my aid as visually simple as I can make it Can my audience understand my visual completely in less than

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=716&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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  • General Formatting Guidelines
    make visuals successful To read more choose any of the items below Landscape Orientation All visuals should appear in landscape rather than portrait orientation In other words display your visual horizontally When preparing transparencies for overhead projectors turn the sheet sideways and mask off a 6 by 9 area Use only this area for your material Maximum Text Readability Help your audience read your visuals by Using no more than three sizes of text Limiting the size of your text between 24 48 pt fonts Avoiding ALL CAPITAL text and italics Clarity and Simplicity Once you ve constructed your visuals answer the following questions Are the visuals as simple as I can make them Are my visuals appealing to the eye Do my colors differentiate my various elements well Is my text easy to read and absolutely necessary Titles Each visual s title should be clear and concise A visual s title is a short declarative sentence similar to a newspaper heading It expresses one main idea only Generally more than eleven words is too lengthy for a title While a title needs to be short and concise it also should accurately describe a visual For instance Accelerated Electrons is

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=717&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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  • Effective Use of Color
    points and differentiate between concepts For instance you might use a specific color to show your audience what steps in a process are dangerous Or perhaps you need to distinguish different elements Colors should be used practically and they also liven up your visuals To read more choose any of the items below Color Uses As humans we appreciate colors Just think how quickly color televisions replaced black and white screens We also use colors to identify and differentiate objects You should use color in your visual aids to Help the audience differentiate key elements in your visual aid Assist you in emphasizing key elements in your presentation Color Numbers Although colors add to your presentation don t overwhelm your audience with too many Keep your visual simple enough three colors plus black and white for lines and text are sufficient Color Contrasts Contrasts make colors appealing Just look at trees changing in autumn Imagine the spectacular shades of yellows reds oranges and browns When choosing three colors for your visual aids you should consider the following Luminance Contrast Luminance refers to the relative brightness of a color Your three colors should encompass a good range of luminance values For

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=718&guideid=35 (2015-10-15)
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