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  • Going to Print
    Organizing Your Layout Layout Tools Elements of Design Typography Page Tones White Black and Gray Readability Issues Going to Print Halftones Creating Halftones Your Options Scanning Scan Resolution Pre print Options Other Questions Your Printer Will Ask Bibliography Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Desktop Publishing Going to Print T o learn more about the final stages of production Halftones Creating Halftones your options Scanning Scan Resolution

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=783&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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  • Halftones
    Layout Layout Tools Elements of Design Typography Page Tones White Black and Gray Readability Issues Going to Print Halftones Creating Halftones Your Options Scanning Scan Resolution Pre print Options Other Questions Your Printer Will Ask Bibliography Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Desktop Publishing Halftones A halftone is a reproduction of a photograph on paper That s the definition but if you want learn more about the technology behind halftones read the next two paragraphs To learn more about creating halftones with your scanner go to the next page To reproduce the gray tones of a black and white photograph printing services convert the photo into a series of black dots so small that the human eye blurs them together with the surrounding white paper The lighter areas of the photo are created by small dots and the darker areas by large dots You re more limited when you try to reproduce a photo using your personal computer Since your output device can only make dots of one size it has to group the dots together into halftone cells Then it reproduces the lighter tones by turning some of the dots off in each cell while turning

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=784&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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  • Creating Halftones: Your Options
    Layout Tools Elements of Design Typography Page Tones White Black and Gray Readability Issues Going to Print Halftones Creating Halftones Your Options Scanning Scan Resolution Pre print Options Other Questions Your Printer Will Ask Bibliography Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Desktop Publishing Creating Halftones Your Options O kay you ve taken the photographs now what You have a few options Use a scanner to create digital images of the photographs Have a printing service create halftones with traditional methods Do both If you have an 8 bit scanner creating digital files is fairly simple and you can use the images during the layout However if you use your scanned images as the final for printing you also have the burden of making them look good The typical printing service won t take responsibility for photos unless it creates the halftones Most services charge somewhere between seven and fifteen dollars to shoot each halftone but the responsibility is all theirs On the other hand if you have image editing software such as Adobe s Photoshop with practice you can create fine camera ready images and save money The 1997 Freestone had around 30 photographs and we saved

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=785&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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  • Scanning
    scan photos here and chances are you ve already done it But we will discuss getting your scanned images ready for your printing service Photos and screens are all halftones Remember those boxes we talked about earlier If you fill a box with a 30 tint then your print shop or typesetter will reproduce it with halftone dots Why is this important Well there are coarse screens and fine screens which are all measured by the number of dots per line For instance coarse halftones may have less than 60 rows of dots per inch The more rows of dots per inch the finer the appearance This is referred as the line screen and is measured as lines per inch lpi Finer line screens around 133 lpi have more cells per inch The lower the lpi the more visible the rows of dots especially when printed at a low resolution such as 300 dpi Images with a high lpi look better when they re reproduced by output devices with a high dpi So higher is better right Not necessarily and this is where good communication with your printing service is important The line screen you choose should be based on

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=786&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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  • Scan Resolution
    Balance Alignment Repetition Emphasis Proximity Elements of Layout The Style Sheet Grids Organizing Your Layout Layout Tools Elements of Design Typography Page Tones White Black and Gray Readability Issues Going to Print Halftones Creating Halftones Your Options Scanning Scan Resolution Pre print Options Other Questions Your Printer Will Ask Bibliography Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Desktop Publishing Scan Resolution W hen it comes to scanned images a higher resolution isn t always better Image resolution is measured as pixels per inch ppi and images scanned at a higher resolution store more information in the digital file You should relate ppi to lpi Set the ppi at roughly 2 times the line screen lpi If your printer suggests that you use an lpi of somewhere between 70 and 106 you ll probably want to scan your photos with a ppi of between 150 and 175 If you hire a service bureau to produce your camera ready copy you can scan images using the higher ppi In any case it s a good idea to discuss both scan resolution ppi as well as line screen lpi with your printing service ahead of time Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=787&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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  • Pre-print Options
    the final product is printed by a professional printing service This also makes it more expensive to produce So if you re on the Freestone staff this semester you now know that you won t be printing 3 500 copies of this year s edition on a laser printer However if you have to produce your newsletter on a tight budget using a high end laser printer might be an acceptable option Unfortunately you won t get the same quality from a laser printer as you will from a commercial printing or quick printing service If you ve already decided to use a printing service then the next decision you have to make is whether to give them a final proof from your laser printer or hire a service bureau to make a camera ready copy on an imagesetter If you really want high quality results go to a service bureau Service bureaus take electronic copies of your publication and create camera ready output to either paper or film for your commercial printer They are a middle man in the process Commercial print shops make printing plates directly from the film negatives Imagesetters can print to paper or film at resolutions up to 2450 dpi This is very high considering that most laser printers only have a dpi of 600 Your print shop should be able to direct you to a local service bureau Remember you don t have to use a service bureau Printing services can shoot film negatives from a laser printout However the quality of the finished product will be higher if you take advantage of the high resolution output of the imagesetter One word of caution if you hire a service bureau proof read a draft of what they plan to shoot on film It s

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=788&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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  • Other Questions Your Printer Will Ask
    an 11 x17 inch piece of paper and print one page per quadrant but this can vary from press to press Each quadrant is 8 5 x 11 inches so a 24 page spread is comprised of six pieces of 11x17 inch paper The first 11x17 inch piece will have pages 1 and 24 facing each other on one side and pages 2 and 23 on the other The second 11x17 inch piece will have pages 3 and 22 facing each other on one side and 4 and 21 on the other Each printer spread is then folded into a booklet form known as a reader s spread where the pages face each other in sequential order Why do you need to know this Your printer may ask you if you ll be providing your file as a printer spread or reader spread Sometimes they charge you a stripping fee to turn the pages into printer spreads Next after everything is printed the papers are bound together with saddle stitching or a side stitching Smaller publications are usually saddle stitched meaning that the staples are driven through the spine of the booklet Nonetheless your printer may ask you what type of binding or stitching you prefer Your other major decision is what type of paper to use coated or uncoated Coated papers produce better clarity especially for halftones This is because uncoated papers absorb more ink But if you really need to keep costs down you might have to choose lower grade paper The easiest way to choose a paper is to touch different samples Papers are described in pounds and finish The Freestone was printed on a 70 paper with a matte finish Generally speaking 60 and 70 are adequate The different finishes are offset linen smooth matte and

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=789&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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  • Bibliography
    Page Tones White Black and Gray Readability Issues Going to Print Halftones Creating Halftones Your Options Scanning Scan Resolution Pre print Options Other Questions Your Printer Will Ask Bibliography Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Desktop Publishing Bibliography Doty David and Joe Grossmann Newsletters from the Desktop The desktop Publisher s guide to designing newsletters that work Ventana Press 1994 Evans Poppy A Designers Guide to Faster Better Easier Design and Production Cincinnati North Light Books 1993 Felker Daniel B Ed Guidelines for Document Designers Washington DC American Institutes for Research Lupton Ellen and J Abbott Miller Design Writing Research Writing on Graphic Design New York Princeton Architectural Press 1996 Parker Roger C Newsletters from the Desktop Designing Effective Publications with Your Computer Chapel Hill Ventana Press 1990 Looking Good in Print Chapel Hill Ventana Press 1988 One Minute Designer MIS Press 1997 Siebert Lori and Lisa Ballard Making a Good Layout Cincinnati North Light Books 1992 Shushan Ronnie Don Wright and Laura Lewis Desktop Publishing by Design Everyone s Guide to PageMaker 6 Microsoft Press 1996 Wheildon Colin Type Layout How Typography and Design Can Get Your Message Across Or Get in the Way Ed Mal

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=790&guideid=36 (2015-10-15)
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