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  • Creating Book Source Notes
    well as in writing up your Works Cited or References List at the end of your document The library call number The author s full name last name first The book s title including its subtitle if it has one underlined or in italics if you are using a computer The publication information place publisher and year of publication For each source note you may want to include a brief

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=511&guideid=26 (2015-10-15)
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  • Creating Periodical Source Notes
    Source Notes Creating Electronic Source Notes Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Developing a Working Bibliography Creating Periodical Source Notes The following information will help you locate specific periodical and journal sources in your library as well as in writing up your Works Cited or References List at the end of your document The author s full name The title of the article in quotation marks followed by the name of the publication underlined or in italics For a scholarly journal the volume number and for certain journals the issue number The date of the issue Form varies with the type of journal or magazine The page numbers of the article Including a sign will indicate an article that appears on more than one page but not on consecutive pages If your library classifies periodicals the call number will be useful however it is not required For each source note you may also want to include a brief annotation on your impression of the usefulness of the work Worth checking out in more detail Take a look at the works cited page Marginal at best Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=512&guideid=26 (2015-10-15)
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  • Creating Field Source Notes
    sources such as interviews observations and surveys as well as in writing up your Works Cited or References List at the end of your document The name of the person you interviewed or the setting you observed A descriptive title such as Interview with Ellen Page The date you conducted the interview or observation For each source note you may also want to include a brief annotation on your impression

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=513&guideid=26 (2015-10-15)
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  • Creating Electronic Source Notes
    Electronic Source Notes Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Developing a Working Bibliography Creating Electronic Source Notes The following information will help you locate specific entries in electronic library databases and other Internet sources as well as in writing up your Works Cited or References List at the end of your document The author s full name if one is available many Web pages do not list authors The editor s full name if indicated The title of the database entry Web page Gopher page or message The name of the database Web site newsgroup or mailing list or Gopher site in which you found the source The Internet address or URL of sources you found on the Internet URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator See the unit Using the World Wide Web for details The date the source was created or last updated The date you accessed the source For each source note you may also want to include a brief annotation on your impression of the usefulness of the work Use in the introduction Best I ve seen yet Use only if other sources don t work out Previous Introduction Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=514&guideid=26 (2015-10-15)
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  • A Definition of Development
    Audience and Focus Affect Development Development and Audience Development and Focus Strategies for Developing Your Ideas Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Developing Your Ideas A Definition of Development D evelopment is how writers choose to elaborate their main ideas Typically we associate development with details because specifics help make generalizations the main idea claim or thesis more concrete Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=516&guideid=27 (2015-10-15)
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  • Reasons for Developing Your Writing
    Most readers tend to get tired of reading texts that require them to fill in the gaps Obviously those texts leave more room for readers to fill in what they want to and not necessarily what the writer intended and so general texts also tend to be less successful in communicating ideas Details are more memorable than generalities and keep readers attention more fully engaged on the text Details tend

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=517&guideid=27 (2015-10-15)
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  • Types of Development
    Development Development and Audience Development and Focus Strategies for Developing Your Ideas Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Developing Your Ideas Types of Development Steve Reid English Department We think about development as being a variety of different things It can be a specific example from the writer s experience It could be statistics that the writers have It could be quotations from authorities that the writers have found It could be first hand observations It could be an interview All writing uses various devices to develop ideas Some are more appropriate than others depending on the writing task As a writer you need to know what counts as development in the discipline you are writing for Writing about the same topic for different assignments often requires you to adjust what details you use For example one essay on OJ Simpson might require your personal reaction to the verdict while another essay might require researched statistics Often you will combine different types of evidence to develop your writing For More Information Amplification Appeal to Emotions Cite Authority Cite Common Assumptions Definition Qualification Use Analogy Use Analysis Use Association Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=518&guideid=27 (2015-10-15)
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  • How Audience and Focus Affect Development
    Affect Development A ll readers have expectations They assume certain details should be included within certain texts For instance readers would be shocked to read NFL statistics in Vogue magazine Biology students wouldn t expect a paragraph on the artistic value of a pond in an article discussing pond algae How you develop your ideas depends on your audience and focus While it may seem obvious to include certain details

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=528&guideid=27 (2015-10-15)
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