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  • Development and Audience
    had walked in on the middle of a conversation In a sense the writer has abandoned readers leaving them to figure out what the writer intends through hints and inferences Your audience is who will read what you write Different audiences expect particular details from texts For instance suppose you are writing about the representation of women in a particular novel You will need to provide background details about the

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=529&guideid=27 (2015-10-15)
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  • Development and Focus
    and Focus Strategies for Developing Your Ideas Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Developing Your Ideas Development and Focus Kate Kiefer English Department Development and focus go hand in hand Writers find it extremely difficult to include lots of specific detail if they haven t focused narrowly mainly because it s hard to move a reader quickly from a very wide view to a very detailed support Having established a narrow focus however writers need to provide detailed support for that focus and so these are the skills most college writing assignments stress The focus of your writing is the main idea you convey Focus is what guides how you develop your ideas For instance perhaps your focus is proving a scientific concept incorrect through an experiment you conducted You would then develop your report by describing what you did your results and how your experiment disproves the concept Or perhaps you re writing to disagree with a philosophical concept You would then develop your essay by presenting the concept and the reasons why you disagree with it These reasons might be your opinions criticisms from another philosopher or perhaps even interviews with instructors Previous Continue Introduction

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=530&guideid=27 (2015-10-15)
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  • Strategies for Developing Your Ideas
    English Department What counts as evidence is disciplinary specific A quote from a novel is evidence is development A research study is evidence Observational research is evidence So yes we always develop our arguments but the ways in which we develop in various disciplines are going to be radically different Developing your ideas requires fine tuning Whether you are reciting your personal experience or interviewing multiple people you should always

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=531&guideid=27 (2015-10-15)
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  • Overview: Documentation Systems
    Research writing is how an academic community exchanges ideas and shares the results of their work You may hear this community called a discourse community That s because its members belong to a specific discipline like anthropology Victorian literature or physics The ongoing conversation between members of these communities helps further the work of individual contributors Publishing is one of the ways in which these communities talk to each other text books articles in professional journals and conference proceedings for example are part of the conversation Collectively they constitute a library of sources upon which any researcher may draw To borrow from this library participants in the conversation must document their use of these sources Available to meet this requirement are a variety of documentation systems designed to fit the specific needs of different academic disciplines In the humanities for instance the Modern Language Association MLA style is preferred while in the social and natural sciences there is a larger tendency toward the American Psychological Association APA style There are no hard and fast rules however The Chicago Manual of Style CMS is often used in both the humanities and the social sciences In the hard sciences preferences run more

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=210&guideid=14 (2015-10-15)
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  • Why Sources are Documented
    What Sources are Documented How Sources are Documented In Text Citations End Documentation Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Documentation Systems An Overview Why Sources are Documented The most obvious reason for documenting your sources is to avoid plagiarism and its consequences There are other reasons as well all related to preserving the integrity of academic inquiry the process involved and the results produced Previous Continue Introduction

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=211&guideid=14 (2015-10-15)
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  • Avoiding Plagiarism
    general definition of plagiarism intentionally representing another person s ideas findings statistics language sentence structure etc as their own There is more to it however than handing in a roommate s composition or pulling a paper off the Internet In fact many incidences of plagiarism are unintentional and quite often the result of carelessness or simple ignorance regarding academic rules Deliberate or not plagiarism is academic dishonesty The consequences are

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=212&guideid=14 (2015-10-15)
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  • Giving Credit Where Credit is Due
    of academic research Not only are intellectual property rights at stake but the simple notion of doing the right thing as well Individuals who have pursued a specific line of inquiry and have made a significant contribution to their field of study deserve recognition it s their due More importantly giving credit eliminates suspicion of having taken credit where credit isn t due Keeping who said what organized allows for

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=213&guideid=14 (2015-10-15)
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  • Building Your Own Credibility
    Credit is Due Building Your Own Credibility Creating Context What Sources are Documented How Sources are Documented In Text Citations End Documentation Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Documentation Systems An Overview Building Your Own Credibility At the core of winning over an audience is the ability to present an argument Convincing others that your way of thinking is worthy can be very challenging and it will be an uphill battle if you build the foundation of your argument on poorly documented research At stake is your credibility Citing and documenting trustworthy sources in your work will bolster the notion that what you have to say is credible and trustworthy It will help convince your audience that you know what you talking about that you are familiar with the historical context of your topic and that your contribution or perspective has value It also provides the information needed for others with similar interests to test your findings Successful duplication of your research serves to strengthen your thesis and validate your conclusions a desirable result Improperly documenting your sources will hinder other researchers from achieving this goal Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=214&guideid=14 (2015-10-15)
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