archive-edu.com » EDU » C » COLOSTATE.EDU

Total: 1507

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • What are the Author's Biases?
    to Ask about Electronic Sources Questions to Ask about Field Sources Consider a Source s Publication Date Consider a Source s Degree of Specialization Consider a Source s Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Evaluating Sources What are the Author s Biases Every author holds opinions that affect his or her discussion of an issue opinions that you as a reader must try to recognize and understand Even the most seemingly factual report such as an encyclopedia article can carry an understated or implied judgment Such judgments reflect an author s bias or preference for one side of an issue over another As you evaluate a source consider whether the author s bias affects his or her presentation of information and opinions Ask whether this results in one side of an issue being treated more favorably than another To explore an author s biases you must ask where his or her allegiances lie Is the bias hidden or stated Ask yourself if you need to look for a balancing viewpoint or approach Just because

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=226&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive


  • What if a Source does not identify its Author?
    does not identify its Author Consider a Source s Publishing Bias Strategies for Evaluating a Web Site Strategies for Evaluating a Periodical Consider a Source s Publication Medium Questions to Ask about Print Sources Questions to Ask about Electronic Sources Questions to Ask about Field Sources Consider a Source s Publication Date Consider a Source s Degree of Specialization Consider a Source s Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Evaluating Sources What if a Source does not identify its Author When an author s identity is withheld as is occasionally the case with newspaper articles and Internet sites on the World Wide Web try to identify the sponsoring organization or publisher and proceed from there If you re working with a print source that does not list an author consider the nature of the publication is it a nationally respected newspaper or a supermarket tabloid Is it a brochure or pamphlet published by an organization recognized as a leader in its field On a Web site look for the organization or publisher s contact

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=227&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Consider a Source's Publishing Bias
    identify its Author Consider a Source s Publishing Bias Strategies for Evaluating a Web Site Strategies for Evaluating a Periodical Consider a Source s Publication Medium Questions to Ask about Print Sources Questions to Ask about Electronic Sources Questions to Ask about Field Sources Consider a Source s Publication Date Consider a Source s Degree of Specialization Consider a Source s Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Evaluating Sources Consider a Source s Publishing Bias As you evaluate a source consider its publisher The person organization government agency or corporation that prints or electronically distributes a source plays an important role in shaping its content Like authors publishers usually have a bias about a particular topic or issue A corporate publisher such as Microsoft which publishes information on one of the largest sites on the World Wide Web presents its products and services more favorably than those of its competitors Similarly political organizations such as the Democratic Party or the National Rifle Association publish sources that contain information in support of policies favored by

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=228&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Strategies for Evaluating a Web Site
    Questions to Ask about Electronic Sources Questions to Ask about Field Sources Consider a Source s Publication Date Consider a Source s Degree of Specialization Consider a Source s Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Evaluating Sources Strategies for Evaluating a Web Site To learn more about the publisher of a Web site try to locate its disclaimers Look for their site information or about links and examine them carefully If you are visiting a Web site sponsored by an organization or agency find out where their mission statement is located and examine it carefully as well Finally examine the related Web sites to which the one you are evaluating is linked Web site publishers tend to link their site to ones they think you will find useful and those that generally agree with their particular outlook or mission statement Examining these links can help you decide whether the publisher of a particular Web site is credible and provides information relevant to the paper you intend to write Here are a few questions to ask when evaluating a Web site Was the site created for particular commercial purposes such as selling a product or service Is the site devoted to a particular political cause or causes Is the site developed by a particular organization or government agency If you are reading a newsgroup or mailing list is it a general interest group or one devoted to a particular cause If you are reading a book what does the name of the publisher tell you about the intended audience Is this publisher known for publishing works in a specific field with a specific political agenda

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=229&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Strategies for Evaluating a Periodical
    Source s Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Evaluating Sources Strategies for Evaluating a Periodical To learn more about the publisher of a periodical take a moment to skim through it and note the following Editorials An editorial sets forth views held by the editors and publishers of a particular magazine and they make no pretense of being impartial Often they are located in the front section and since the author s names are on the masthead near the table of contents they may not even be signed If you find an editorial commenting on an issue with which you are familiar you may discover the bias of the magazine s publisher Featured Columnists Generally though not always the job of a columnist depends on his or her ability to voice opinions congenial to those held by the magazine s editors and publishers When a dissenting columnist is hired it is to provide an opposing view Examining a magazine s feature columns and the authors who write them will provide you with valuable insight regarding a publisher s biases and sense of fair play Lead Stories The lead story in a magazine is usually the one placed most prominently in a given issue and its cover will often reflect the particular slant a publisher favors Skimming the first and last few paragraph of a lead story will often reveal the writer s overall message You can then make a decision regarding whether or not to read the entire article Letters to the Editor The level of education and intelligence of a magazine s readers can often be deduced by the letters written to its

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=230&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Consider a Source's Publication Medium
    a Periodical Consider a Source s Publication Medium Questions to Ask about Print Sources Questions to Ask about Electronic Sources Questions to Ask about Field Sources Consider a Source s Publication Date Consider a Source s Degree of Specialization Consider a Source s Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=231&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Questions to Ask about Print Sources
    s Publication Medium Questions to Ask about Print Sources Questions to Ask about Electronic Sources Questions to Ask about Field Sources Consider a Source s Publication Date Consider a Source s Degree of Specialization Consider a Source s Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Evaluating Sources Questions to Ask about Print Sources Is the source relevant to your research project Is it related to your argumentative claim Does the table of contents in a book indicate its relevance Does an article contain an abstract that summarizes its contents What is the purpose of the publication Is it to sell a product or service Is it to inform Is it to publish new research Is it to shape opinion about a particular issue or cause Who is the author of your source Is information provided about the author s credentials and profession Is the author an expert on the topic Does the author s stance on the topic appear to influence information in the source What can you tell about the publisher Is the publisher a nationally respected newspaper such as the New York Times the Washington Post or Newsweek Is the publisher a major publishing corporation such as Bedford St Martins or Houghton Mifflin Is the source found in an academic or professional journal such as College English or the New England Journal of Medicine Are your chosen sources documented Is the information consistent with that found in other print electronic and field sources How specialized is your sources information Does it provide a broad overview of an issue Does it focus on a narrow topic using highly specialized jargon Will your audience be

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=232&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Questions to Ask about Electronic Sources
    Role in Your Research Consider a Source s Origins Are they Primary or Secondary Consider a Source s Evidence Is it Accurate Balanced Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Evaluating Sources Questions to Ask about Electronic Sources Is the source relevant to your research project Is it related to your argumentative claim Who is the author of your source If it is a Web page is any information provided about the author Is an electronic mail address provided so that you can contact the author If it is a post to a newsgroup or mailing list what can you tell from the author s electronic mail address and signature file if one is provided Are the sources of information provided on the Web site newsgroup or mailing list provided Is the information consistent with the information found in print sources other Web sites newsgroups or mailing lists If you re evaluating a Web site that is sponsored by an organization government agency or corporation what do you know about the sponsor Is a bias clearly evident in the material provided on the site Is this a commercial site that is trying to sell a product or service Is this a site that pushes a particular issue or political agenda If you are evaluating posts on a newsgroup or mailing list what do you know about the purpose of the newsgroup or list Is a FAQ frequently asked questions file available Is it clear from the posts whether there is a general bias among members of the newsgroup or list How specialized is the information in the source Does the source provide a broad overview of an issue Does it focus on a narrow topic using highly specialized jargon Will your audience be able to understand key terms

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=233&guideid=15 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive