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  • Outlining an Informative Speech
    Sentence Outline The Speaking Outline Delivering an Informative Speech Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Informative Speaking Outlining an Informative Speech T wo types of outlines can help you prepare to deliver your speech The complete sentence outline provides a useful means of checking the organization and content of your speech The speaking outline is an essential aid for delivering your speech In this section we discuss

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1075&guideid=52 (2015-10-15)
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  • The Complete Sentence Outline
    for your presentation The following information is useful however in helping you prepare your speech The complete sentence outline helps you organize your material and thoughts and it serves as an excellent copy for editing the speech The complete sentence outline is just what it sounds like an outline format including every complete sentence not fragments or keywords that will be delivered during your speech Writing the Outline You should create headings for the introduction body and conclusion and clearly signal shifts between these main speech parts on the outline Use standard outline format For instance you can use Roman numerals letters and numbers to label the parts of the outline Organize the information so the major headings contain general information and the sub headings become more specific as they descend Think of the outline as a funnel you should make broad general claims at the top of each part of the outline and then tighten the information until you have exhausted the point Do this with each section of the outline Be sure to consult with your instructor about specific aspects of the outline and refer to your course book for further information and examples Using the Outline If

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1076&guideid=52 (2015-10-15)
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  • The Speaking Outline
    Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Informative Speaking The Speaking Outline D epending upon the assignment and the instructor you may use a speaking outline during your presentation The following information will be helpful in preparing your speech through the use of a speaking outline This outline should be on notecards and should be a bare bones outline taken from the complete sentence outline Think of the speaking outline as train tracks to guide you through the speech Writing the Outline Many speakers find it helpful to highlight certain words passages or to use different colors for different parts of the speech You will probably want to write out long or cumbersome quotations along with your source citation Many times the hardest passages to learn are those you did not write but were spoken by someone else Avoid the temptation to over do the speaking outline many speakers write too much on the cards and their grades suffer because they read from the cards Using the Outline The best strategy for becoming comfortable with a speaking outline is preparation You should prepare well ahead of time and spend time working with the notecards and memorizing key sections of your speech

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1077&guideid=52 (2015-10-15)
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  • Delivering an Informative Speech
    Informative Speech F or many speakers delivery is the most intimidating aspect of public speaking Although there is no known cure for nervousness you can make yourself much more comfortable by following a few basic delivery guidelines In this section we discuss those guidelines The Five Step Method for Improving Delivery Read aloud your full sentence outline Listen to what you are saying and adjust your language to achieve a good clear simple sentence structure Practice the speech repeatedly from the speaking outline Become comfortable with your keywords to the point that what you say takes the form of an easy natural conversation Practice the speech aloud rehearse it until you are confident you have mastered the ideas you want to present Do not be concerned about getting it just right Once you know the content you will find the way that is most comfortable for you Practice in front of a mirror tape record your practice and or present your speech to a friend You are looking for feedback on rate of delivery volume pitch non verbal cues gestures card usage etc and eye contact Do a dress rehearsal of the speech under conditions as close as possible to

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1078&guideid=52 (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing for the Web
    the Web This collection of resources is designed to support and help writers who want to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Informative Speeches Show Descriptions Writing Guides Informative Speaking Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web site supported by Colorado State University Content

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=78 (2015-10-15)
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  • Choosing Sources to Establish Credibility
    Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Choosing Sources to Establish Credibility The main reason writers include sources in their work is to establish credibility with their audience Credibility is the level of trustworthiness and authority that a reader perceives a writer has on a subject and is one of the key characteristics of effective writing particularly argumentative writing Without credibility a writer s ideas

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1688&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • To Show Your Knowledge of the Subject
    Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources To Show Your Knowledge of the Subject Writing that shoots from the hip without citing sources is fine for many purposes an Op Ed piece for instance but not for academic writing Without establishing that they have researched and studied their subject writers can and do appear intelligent and witty however the question arises

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1689&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • Aligning Yourself with Experts
    Summarizing Source Material Being Accurate Being Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Aligning Yourself with Experts When establishing credibility with a jury attorneys often call witnesses to the stand who have expertise in a given field The expert witness provides opinions and presents facts regarding the technical aspects of a case This is done because the attorney does not have the professional credentials of the witness By borrowing the credentials of the expert the attorney is better able to argue his or her case For instance a brain surgeon has the medical expertise to explain whether why or how a certain type of brain injury leads to memory loss The attorney does not and banks on the jury trusting the expert testimony of the surgeon As a student you are often put into this same position You will be writing about unfamiliar subjects topics in which you have little or no expertise By including source material in your writing you too are calling upon expert witnesses Researching outside sources helps you find statements from authorities on the subject that you then can quote or paraphrase within your paper The ideas

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1691&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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