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  • Summarizing Source Material
    Material Grammar and Spelling Issues Punctuating Quotations Paraphrasing Source Material Overview Paraphrasing Accurate Paraphrasing How to Paraphrase Without Plagiarizing Summarizing Source Material Overview Summarizing Source Material Being Accurate Being Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Summarizing Source Material A summary captures the general idea main points or opinions found in your source material without providing a lot of details Note

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=300&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • Overview: Summarizing Source Material
    Quote Editing Quotations Blending Quoted Material Grammar and Spelling Issues Punctuating Quotations Paraphrasing Source Material Overview Paraphrasing Accurate Paraphrasing How to Paraphrase Without Plagiarizing Summarizing Source Material Overview Summarizing Source Material Being Accurate Being Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Overview Summarizing Source Material Summarizing a single source or a collection of related sources can provide your reader with background or supporting information that helps them better understand your chosen topic It is also a useful method to point out material that either supports or contradicts your argument while not distracting your reader with irrelevant details As with quoting and paraphrasing you must document the sources you summarize Unlike a paraphrase which rewords a specific passage and often remains the same length as the original a summary reduces the material into a more concise statement To be effective you must choose your words carefully being accurate objective focused and concise Once you fully understand the intended meaning conveyed by the source material write your summary Pay close attention to the precise meaning of the words you choose and be especially careful not to introduce new ideas Developing critical reading skills

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=301&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • Being Accurate
    Source Material Overview Paraphrasing Accurate Paraphrasing How to Paraphrase Without Plagiarizing Summarizing Source Material Overview Summarizing Source Material Being Accurate Being Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Being Accurate Being accurate requires that you fully understand the ideas and information presented in your source material Misunderstanding an author s tone of voice or misinterpreting the information he or she has

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=302&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • Being Objective
    Accurate Being Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Being Objective Being objective is as important as being accurate It s a matter of fairness Interjecting personal opinions into the ideas or information in your summary confuses the reader by obscuring the information in the original source material Expressing your attitude toward it whether negative or positive is inappropriate and self

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=304&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • Being Focused
    Source Material Being Accurate Being Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Being Focused Being focused means not wandering off topic Stick to what s important A good summary highlights only those facts ideas opinions etc that are useful in helping your reader understand the topic being presented Avoid a detailed account of the minutia contained in your source material Including

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=306&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • Being Concise
    Paraphrasing How to Paraphrase Without Plagiarizing Summarizing Source Material Overview Summarizing Source Material Being Accurate Being Objective Being Focused Being Concise Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Integrating Sources Being Concise Being concise means being as brief as possible Details examples and descriptions contained in the original source material should be removed as well as information repeated or rephrased in slightly varying ways The whole idea of

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=308&guideid=16 (2015-10-15)
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  • Overview
    for ways to go about conceptualizing introducing sequencing and structuring the course These ideas can be developed synthesized and adapted in whatever ways you may see fit As you use these materials for ideas and inspiration however please be aware that E238 is a course designed to achieve several goals According to the criteria defined by GTPathways a minimum of 25 of E238 should be devoted to writing Writing can be defined in many different ways according to individual course goals papers essay tests journal prompts online blogging and posting to Writing Studio discussion forums are just a few ways that instructors of E238 might choose to incorporate writing into daily classroom activities Although the course title suggests that E238 focuses on reading discussing and analyzing Twentieth Century Fiction choosing readings for the course requires considerations other than date of publication Readings chosen for inclusion in E238 typically emphasize writers and stories with international or multi cultural backgrounds Readings chosen for E238 typically emphasize values and world views that change over the course of the twentieth century and may invite personal thematic and structural comparisons between texts cultures and viewpoints E238 is intended to help students develop and demonstrate critical

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/e238/overview.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • CDHE Nomination Form
    of non European cultures to those of Western cultures or high to popular cultures Given the international and multi cultural selection of fictions students constantly compare and contrast the attitudes and values of one culture with those of other cultures The course explores some of the questions that men and women universally engage the relationship of individuals to community to the natural world to the divine the characteristics of fulfilling lives the power of love and hatred the contingencies of sanity and madness imaginings of the self 3 Describe student outcomes Students come to understand something of the universal and variable aspects of the human condition that is both fundamental similarities that are shared by differing peoples in the 20th century but also to grasp differences in attitudes issues and concerns between peoples of widely varying cultures Students learn the complex ways meaning is constituted in literary text by recognizing generic conventions by understanding the relevance of historical geographical contexts of both writer and reader and how different contexts can result in different readings Students learn to read analytically and critically and to appreciate narrative structures Students learn to formulate ideas about novels and short stories and to express them in their writing Students learn to critique specific interpretations offered by their classmates their teacher and other critics Students learn to articulate their own readings of a text both orally and in writing using relevant textual support and cogent argumentation 4 Describe how students demonstrate and develop critical thinking in this course The central concerns of the course as outlined above develop many aspects of students critical thinking skills Understanding literature requires identifying key questions problems and arguments taken up by the texts information acquisition sifting textual evidence for stated and unstated assumptions analysis and forming hypotheses about cultural responses to key questions and problems application Conclusions reached about one text are then tested against claims and implications made in subsequent texts analysis and synthesis Class discussion thus typically engages differing ideas about for example love or authority or obligation forms various arguments about them and tests those arguments against textual and historical evidence communication Students not only discuss alternative points of view but evaluate peers use of evidence in supporting interpretive conclusions Students demonstrate competencies in critical thinking in class discussion and formal and informal writing 5 Describe how students demonstrate and develop reading competency All literature courses are courses in reading covering in this course especially the specific purposes expectations conventions and relations to meaning of the genre of fiction information acquisition Students must be able to recognize basic elements of the genre and explain how those elements affect meaning in the work as a whole application Students also necessarily learn to deal with the figurative vs literal meanings including irony and other modes of indirection The international and cross cultural scope of the course mandates that students study the literature in the cultural context of its production including how the text does or does not reflect dominant

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/e238/cdhe.cfm (2015-10-15)
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