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  • Individual Topic Assignments
    Traditional And Or Portfolio Grading Gogela Text Analysis Text Analysis Assignments Text Analysis Activities Individual Topics Individual Topic Assignments Individual Topic Activities Reflective Writing Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Individual Topic Assignments As you think about the Unit Two portfolio please consider contributing your assignment sheets workshop sheets and student samples for this part of our collection Please note that the Position Paper Tiffany Myers describes is only one of

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/co301bman/pop7a.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Individual Topic Activities
    Portfolios Portfolio Overview Kiefer Portfolio Explanation Harper Portfolio Grading Holtcamp Portfolios Promises Problems Practices Kiefer Traditional And Or Portfolio Grading Gogela Text Analysis Text Analysis Assignments Text Analysis Activities Individual Topics Individual Topic Assignments Individual Topic Activities Reflective Writing Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Individual Topic Activities As you think about ways of helping students with the Unit Two portfolio please consider contributing your reading critical analysis or impromptu writing

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  • Reflective Writing
    Kiefer Syllabus Rilling Portfolios Portfolio Overview Kiefer Portfolio Explanation Harper Portfolio Grading Holtcamp Portfolios Promises Problems Practices Kiefer Traditional And Or Portfolio Grading Gogela Text Analysis Text Analysis Assignments Text Analysis Activities Individual Topics Individual Topic Assignments Individual Topic Activities Reflective Writing Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Reflective Writing Some teachers include a week or two for students to reflect in detail on the writing and learning they ve done over the course of CO301B In part these teachers use the final two weeks of the term to give themselves time to evaluate and comment fully on the Unit Two portfolios But these teachers are also motivated at least in part by a strong sense that the most effective learning includes analyzing and reflecting on the learning experience For example in the last week of regular class sessions and the final exam period Laura Thomas asks students to present the topics of their portfolios including reading from selected pieces She also guides them toward detailed self analysis of their learning in the course Kate Kiefer works toward the same goals with some directed postings on the class Forum If you develop any specific guidelines for similar presentations or questions to

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  • Print-Friendly Page
    that I may not have noted I will be happy to comment on as many drafts of papers for this class as you want to give me Send me the draft by e mail or drop it off with me and I will return it to you with comments within two days Note My students find this one of the best ways to improve their writing during the semester 4 Responsibility Even though I will comment on drafts and we will have regular workshops during which your classmates will also comment on your papers remember that you are in control of your writing You know what you want to communicate in a given paper 5 Portfolio grading You will be graded on two portfolios of completed work due on the dates specified on the attached assignment syllabus For Portfolio 1 you may choose among the text analysis assignments from the first 6 weeks of the semester Portfolio 2 will include at least 15 pages of finished polished original work 2 or 3 pieces your choice You can find much more detail about each portfolio on our class Web page 6 Daily writing In addition to the portfolios I assign daily reading and writing We ll review how to send your assignments to me electronically but you may also print out this writing and turn it in on paper I keep track of DAILY writing on the day it s due so being late means you probably won t get credit 7 Drafts Please keep all drafts handwritten and computer generated of your papers and clip them to the final copy in the portfolio 8 Documentation Much of your writing in this course will draw on outside sources and so we will discuss appropriate documentation in detail as the semester progresses Improper documentation including all forms of plagiarism merits an F for the portfolio 9 When we meet as a class we will generally work on the computers in our classroom If you re not familiar with Windows plan to run through the tutorials available in room 300 Eddy 10 On days noted as work days in the syllabus this classroom will be available for you to work here to confer with me to complete DAILY writing to read and write e mail to write on the Web forum to meet with your peer reviewers or group members If you prefer to complete your work for CO301B at another time you ll have to work upstairs in Eddy 300 or from another computer on or off campus You will need an e mail account because I regularly send messages to the class If you want to work on a Mac it is your responsibility to save and transfer files in a format others can read in our classroom See me for details If the technology ever baffles you I will be here to answer your questions and step you through a process of using each computer tool you need for the class Your final grade will be determined as follows Portfolio 1 35 Portfolio 2 55 Participation 10 Policy Statement Rilling CO301B Writing in the Disciplines Sciences TR 12 30 1 45 Eddy 2 Spring 2000 Instructor Sarah Rilling PhD e mail srilling lamar colostate edu Office 1 Eddy 333 Hours TR 10 00 12 20 Phone 491 3344 Office 2 Co Op Units IEP Hours M 1 2 30 Phone 491 6616 Course Purpose This course emphasizes expository and argumentative writing about the sciences for lay audiences Although you may sometimes write to readers with a science background your work in CO301B will not include technical writing in your scientific disciplines You will practice appropriate forms and techniques for adapting writing about science to the needs of different non expert audiences including readers of such publications as Scientific American Discover or National Geographic You will write analyses and explanations of the rhetoric in your discipline and in popular scientific writing You will practice writing about scientific and technical topics and controversies for a non specialist audience Throughout the course you will practice adapting form and style to your audience The course focuses on 1 writing processes with a special emphasis on revising and editing and 2 critical reading processes with an emphasis on reading from a writer s point of view CO301B focuses on multiple modes and genres of written discourse Students taking the course will learn about and practice writing a wide range of essays including those that explain interpret react to or reflect on specific issues for general audiences CO301B addresses a broad range of issues concerning how writers adapt their texts to diverse audiences including which genres are most appropriate for specific rhetorical purposes Course Means We will engage in face to face and online discussions and practice of course readings rhetorical strategies in analyzing texts of various kinds and writing techniques for converting scientific discourse into language understandable to specific non specialist audiences Required Text MacKenzie N R Ed 1995 Science and technology today Readings for writers NY NY St Martin s Press Papers Descriptions of papers will be available online at least one week prior to the due date for that paper For each paper you will write approximately 3 double spaced pages in 12 point font 10 points per paper for 60 points Mid Term Portfolio The midterm portfolio is a collection of 8 9 pages of finished polished work In the portfolio you must include revised writing you have completed for the class including papers and or in class writing assignments You can select which components you will further develop from your earlier drafts Be sure to rethink revisit revise these papers significantly You must also include a one page cover memo in which you describe the portfolio from a process and or product perspective 100 points Final Portfolio The final portfolio is a collection of 15 pages of finished polished work In the final portfolio you must include a revision of paper 5 All other papers are of your choosing and can include revisions of earlier papers or in class writing including further revisions on mid term portfolio essays Your final portfolio must also contain a cover memo addressing final portfolio process product 100 points Grades 360 Total Possible Points Papers 60 Points Mid Term Portfolio 100 Points Final Portfolio 100 Points In Class Discussions and Practice online face to face 100 points half awarded with the mid term portfolio and half with the final portfolio Grades are based on straight percentages A 324 or more points 90 B 288 to 323 points 80 89 C 252 to 287 points 70 79 D 216 to 251 points 60 69 F below 216 Notes Late papers will be docked two points per day late Late portfolios will be docked 20 points per day late Syllabi As you ll see in the detailed syllabi linked below each teacher works out different timelines for collecting papers or portfolios Sample Weekly Outline Syllabus Kiefer Syllabus Rilling Sample Weekly Outline Weeks 1 6 Unit I Text Analysis During the first six weeks of the course students will read and analyze articles written in the field on which the course focuses a arts and humanities b sciences c social sciences or d education The goal of this reading activity is to help students understand how the rhetorical context in which a text is produced author purpose audience subject affects the final product Students will write three analyses of selected articles The goal of writing analyses of the readings is to help students understand that the choices writers make are intentional and influenced by a variety of rhetorical factors These analyses will also help students develop skills such as reading with a writer s eye and understanding how to make informed choices in their own writing Week 1 Course overview assign readings and first homework assignments in class writing and discussions focus on rhetorical situation and students previous writing experiences Week 2 Assign first analysis essay assign additional readings and homework in class writing and discussions focus on analyzing rhetorical situations and varieties of text analysis Week 3 Workshop and revise first analysis essay assign additional readings and homework in class writing and discussions focus on revision techniques analytical techniques and workshop techniques Week 4 Collect first analysis essay assign second analysis essay assign additional readings and homework in class writing and discussions focus on additional techniques for analyzing texts and rhetorical contexts Week 5 Workshop and revise second analysis essay assign additional readings and homework in class writing and discussions focus on revision techniques additional analytical techniques and workshop techniques Week 6 Collect second analysis essay assign third analysis essay assign additional readings and homework in class writing and discussions focus on additional techniques for analyzing texts and rhetorical contexts Weeks 7 14 Unit II Writing Texts During the next eight weeks of the course students will focus on writing texts for multiple audiences One goal of this unit is to help them learn about the demands of writing for different rhetorical situations and of adapting information and arguments for varying audiences A second primary goal is to enhance their ability to write with appropriate style and register for particular audiences A third goal is to help them learn to adapt organization strategies and select appropriate forms of evidence for their audiences A fourth goal is to enhance their planning drafting and revising skills In this unit students will select an individual or group topic in the broad disciplinary area upon which the course focuses conduct a rhetorical analysis of the topic create a research plan identifying the overall issue s they will address the texts they will analyze the kinds of analyses they will conduct the essays they will write These essays will consist of a total of at least 15 finished pages of final polished work and must represent at least two separate pieces written to different types of audiences Class time during this portion of the course will be devoted to workshops conferences strategy sessions and student group presentations on style issues Week 7 Collect third analysis essay introduce Unit II create topic groups discuss research techniques begin research on topics Week 8 Assign rhetorical analysis of a topic paper homework and in class writing focus on rhetorical and textual analysis techniques provide opportunities for topic groups to meet and plan during class Week 9 Collect rhetorical analysis of a topic assignment assign research plan paper homework and in class writing focus on rhetorical and textual analysis techniques discuss advanced research techniques provide opportunities for topic groups to meet and plan during class Week 10 Collect research plan assignment assign major writing assignment for the unit at least two essays totaling at least 15 pages of polished prose written for different audiences homework and in class writing focus on generating ideas for the essays discuss writing processes Weeks 11 14 Workshop mode for the remainder of the unit classes begin with a daily writing assignment tied into their essays then move to brief full class discussions then move into drafting and workshopping activities adapted to the needs of individual students teacher conferences and reviews essay drafts with students Weeks 15 16 Unit III Course Wrap Up Collect major essay assignment class discussions focus on student efforts to adapt their writing to specific audiences and contexts review analytic techniques for texts and rhetorical situations The last week of class will be devoted to presentations of student writing and self analysis of student learning in the course The final exam will focus on how adapting student essays for an additional audience specified by the teacher Syllabus Kiefer CO301B Fall 2000 Writing in the Sciences Daily Outline Week 1 Aug 22 24 Tuesday Introduction to the course our focus the kinds of writing tasks portfolios daily writing individual and group forum postings policies Readings due Thursday Orwell pp 13 16 Selzer pp 464 470 Sacks pp 471 478 in Science and Technology Today STT Thursday Audiences for science writing how and where does the personal perspective fit Readings due Tuesday Goodall pp 175 185 Halloran pp 484 497 Sauer pp 509 527 STT Week 2 Aug 29 31 Tuesday How writing shapes science Readings due Thursday Keller pp 38 50 Tilghman pp 51 55 Hershberger pp 498 508 Huxley pp 17 24 in STT Thursday How culture shapes writing writers and readers Readings due Tuesday Form groups and collect journal skim the journal cover to cover Week 3 Sept 5 7 Tuesday Looking more closely at readers group work on your journal post on the Forum For Thursday Be sure to read other groups Forum postings Thursday From journal to article group work on selected article Draft your conclusions as a lab report to post on the Forum for the class For Tuesday Select an article to work on for the next two weeks This article can be from one of the journals the class has considered or some other journal that might be a publication venue for your work in portfolio 2 Make a photocopy of the specific article for me Try to bring a copy of the journal to class next week Be sure to read other students Forum postings Week 4 Sept 12 14 Tuesday Context analysis with focus on journal readership Draft your conclusions as a lab report to post on the Forum for the class For Thursday Be sure to read other students Forum postings Thursday Text analysis focused on organization development and style Draft your conclusions as a lab report to post on the Forum for the class For Tuesday Be sure to read other students Forum postings Week 5 Sept 19 21 Tuesday Converting descriptive reports to text analysis essays Start drafting for portfolio 1 Thursday Work day a great opportunity for a conference Continue drafting for portfolio 1 Week 6 Sept 26 28 Tuesday Peer review how and why to workshop First workshop on draft for portfolio 1 required attendance with draft Thursday Work day a great opportunity for a conference Week 7 Oct 3 5 Tuesday Second workshop on draft for portfolio 1 required attendance with draft Thursday Final workshop on draft for portfolio 1 required attendance with draft Week 8 Oct 10 12 Tuesday Portfolio 1 due complete postscript in class Readings for Thursday Ehrenreich pp 405 409 Baumrind pp 410 417 Woodward et al pp 418 423 Begley pp 455 458 in STT Thursday Possible topics for portfolio 2 Due Tuesday Jot down your best research tips Week 9 Oct 17 19 Tuesday Doing research Thursday Work day Daily is due by 5 p m Week 10 Oct 24 26 Tuesday Commit to a topic Discuss audiences formats for portfolio 2 papers Thursday Work day Daily is due by 5 p m Week 11 Oct 31 Nov 2 Tuesday Work day Daily is due by 5 p m Thursday Work day Daily is due by 5 p m Week 12 Nov 7 9 Tuesday First workshop on draft for portfolio 2 required attendance with draft Send a DAILY with your revision plan by 5 p m today Thursday Work day a great opportunity for a conference Submit a draft in progress by 5 p m Week 13 Nov 14 16 Tuesday Second workshop on draft for portfolio 2 required attendance with draft Send a DAILY with your revision plan by 5 p m today Thursday Work day a great opportunity for a conference Submit a draft in progress by 5 p m Happy Thanksgiving Week 14 Nov 28 30 Tuesday Workshop on draft for portfolio 2 required attendance with draft Send a DAILY with your revision plan by 5 p m today Use the DAILY prompts for either 11 7 or 11 14 for today s revision plan Thursday Style and editing workshop on draft for portfolio 2 attendance strongly recommended Week 15 Dec 5 7 Tuesday Portfolio 2 due Complete postscript in class Thursday Forum day In what ways did you see culture shaping your writing on portfolio 2 How does your writing shape your readers view of your science culture How can you apply what you ve learned and practiced this term to be successful in writing in your field Finals Week Final class to collect student evaluations and to return portfolios Syllabus Rilling Timeline T Jan 18 R Jan 20 Hardison p 198 T Jan 25 Watson Crick p 479 R Jan 27 Halloran p 484 T Feb 1 Disciplinary Texts Paper 1 Rhetorical Analysis Response R Feb 3 ditto T Feb 8 ditto R Feb 10 Orwell p 13 Paper 2 Disciplinary Rhetorical Analysis T Feb 15 Huxley p 17 R Feb 17 Snow p 25 T Feb 22 Hughs p 234 R Feb 24 Rybczynski p 103 Paper 3 What s a Scientist T Feb 29 Postman p 128 R March 2 Brown p 274 Mid Term Portfolio March 4 12 Spring Break March 12 19 Conference Break T March 21 Kuhn p 165 R March 23 Goodall p 175 Paper 4 Rhet Analysis of Popular Science Mag T March 28 Carson p 344 R March 30 Gore Handout T April 4 ditto R April 6 McPhee p 358 T April 11 Reisner Handout R April 13 ditto Paper 5 Topic for a non specialist audience T April 18 Elshtain p 424 R April 20 Karpati p 435 T April 25 Begley pg 455 R April 27 Hubbard p 304 Paper 6 Rhetorical Analysis of Specific Texts T May 2 Wheeler p 323 R May 4 Final Portfolio Due Portfolios Some teachers find portfolios too time consuming to evaluate and so they may choose to collect individual papers That s certainly an option for CO301B Many teachers of the course however have found that portfolios benefit students in many ways So we include here one teacher s description of the portfolio elements overview as well as several pieces examining the pros and

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  • Contributors to this Guide
    Sample Weekly Outline Syllabus Kiefer Syllabus Rilling Portfolios Portfolio Overview Kiefer Portfolio Explanation Harper Portfolio Grading Holtcamp Portfolios Promises Problems Practices Kiefer Traditional And Or Portfolio Grading Gogela Text Analysis Text Analysis Assignments Text Analysis Activities Individual Topics Individual Topic Assignments Individual Topic Activities Reflective Writing Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Contributors to this Guide Content Development Bronwyn Becker Cathy Coan Anne Gogela Marisa Harper Kate Kiefer Donna LeCourt Tiffany

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  • Frequently Asked Questions
    Authors Contributors Frequently Asked Questions Many instructors who are considering teaching in the computer classroom have questions that often do not get addressed until computer teaching orientation Below is a list of questions submitted by TA s interested in computer assisted instruction The following questions have been answered in part using material from the book Transitions Teaching Writing in Computer Supported and Traditional Classrooms These question will address some of your basic concerns but Transitions contains a much more in depth treatment of a wide variety of computer classroom related issues Will I be expected to be a computer whiz How often should I be using the computers If the technology is not functioning properly does that affect one s authority as instructor How do you monitor what students are doing on the computer Do students in the computer classroom generally produce better writing What are the benefits to teaching in the computer classroom What are the non obvious differences between teaching in the computer classroom and teaching in the traditional classroom How are TAs chosen to teach in the computer classroom Answers to other questions can be found under Key Questions to Answer in Training Teachers for the Computer

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/intro_pcclass/pop2a.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • 'I wish I had known'
    are from TA s who have made the transition from the traditional writing classroom to the computer classroom Keep in mind that different instructors will have different sometimes contradictory perspectives and experiences While informative anecdotal evidence should be considered accordingly The responses to the following questions were made by GTA s at Colorado State University What do you wish you had known before you started teaching in the computer classroom

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  • Reading Literature about CAI
    what sources you review and when they were written it is possible to get a somewhat unbalanced view of CAI For instance many early articles about computer based writing instruction are perhaps overly optimistic about the effects it can have on the writing classroom or maybe they simply grant computers greater power in writing instruction than they really deserve Consider the following The computer more than any staff development program journal article or administrative mandate has the potential to alter the environment of the classroom and with it the role of both teacher and student Boiarsky 47 Networked microcomputers dissolve the proscenium classroom juxtaposing the students as isolated individuals situation in the traditional writing classroom with the students new positions in the networked classroom as knowledge makers and participants in the discourse of the community as defined by the network Barker and Kemp 16 17 The computer based community creates an atmosphere of openness informality and conviviality Such an atmosphere contributes much toward truly fostering an editor writer relationship between teacher and students as well as a peer system in which students rely on one another Boiarsky 63 Now in the computer classroom situated for writing the student may assume authority of his or her unmutilated text on the screen the instructor occupying the background questioning coaching offering consultation and observing Sudol 334 Along with the laudatory comments a complementary body of criticism has arisen In some ways the field now seems to have experienced a pendulum swing and many researchers seemed pre occupied with the negative or potentially negative aspects of CAI Of course computers are only one of a number of factors that affect the writing classroom and this should be kept in mind as you review the literature of the field Browsing the sources found through Related

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/intro_pcclass/pop2c.cfm (2015-10-15)
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