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  • Argument Quiz Discussion Starter
    proposition or claim the claim becomes your thesis It is based on an analysis of your audience It represents and evaluates opposing points of view on the issue fairly and accurately It reasonably argues for your claim and against opposing claims It supports your claims with sufficient evidence 2 What kinds of claims can you make in an argument Claims of fact that are not easily measured or verified such as Grades do not measure intelligence or achievement Claims about cause and effect such as Capital punishment does not deter violent crime Claims about value such as Boxing is a dehumanizing sport Claims about solutions or policies such as Pornography on the Internet should be censored 3 What is an appeal to an audience A strategy for gaining their trust or confidence that the argument you are presenting is reasonable appropriate and worthwhile 4 What kinds of appeals can you use to support your argument Appeals to reason logos such as inductive logic scientific method Appeals to character ethos Appeals to emotion pathos Combined appeals 5 What are the characteristics of Rogerian argument It avoids a confrontations stance It presents your character as reasonable and understanding It establishes common ground with the opposition It shows a willingness to change your views It works toward a compromise or workable solution 6 What are three logical fallacies often used in poorly constructed arguments Hasty generalization conclusion not justified by the evidence Post hoc ergo propter hoc faulty causal model Genetic fallacy arguing that the origins of a person object or institution determine its character nature or worth Begging the question loading the conclusion in the claim such as Useless psychology courses should be dropped from the curriculum Circular argument restating the claim as the conclusion such as John is a great teacher

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/argument_quiz_palmquist.htm (2015-10-15)
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  • Claims Map Activity
    to dorm room Give students 5 minutes to work on their maps Have students briefly look at each other s maps there should be a different map on each side of any one student Then ask students to find specific locations on each other s maps For example ask how many students could find the instructor s hometown or another fairly obscure city in the U S Damascus MD or Troy NY work well on map 1 Chances are no one can Next ask students to find a remote location in Colorado for map 2 the Brass Ass Casino in Cripple Creek works well for this one Again chances are no one can Then ask students how many of them could find their way from the classroom to another student s place of abode dorms apartment etc Here most students will be able to Lead a discussion about why the first two maps are less effective than the third Points to make 1 a generally focused map can t used to locate a very specific site 2 a map s scale must match its purpose 3 from a map user s point of view finding one s way is completely

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/claimsmap_jackson.htm (2015-10-15)
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  • Evaluating Writing
    Purpose Audience Focus Coherence Development Style Mechanics Grammar Then provide some basic definitions for these terms on an overhead Ask students to copy them down and learn them You might collaborate with other instructors to build these definitions or refer to The Prentice Hall Guide for ideas Also the Writing CSU teaching guide Rhetorical Terminology can be found at http writing colostate edu guides teaching rhet terms Once students have a general understanding of these terms you can allow them to self diagnose their own writing strengths and weaknesses For example rather than writing lengthy comments on each student s homework assignment ask them to reflect on their papers and think critically about how you arrived at a particular grade While evaluating the papers you might keep a list of the most common strengths and weaknesses for the class as a whole Then share this list with students during class and ask them to assess how they handled the criteria Students will find this easier to accomplish if you include a brief diagnosis at the end of their draft i e strong awareness of audience but focus could use improvement As they reflect on their work they should locate specific

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/evaluating_mitchell.htm (2015-10-15)
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  • Interpretive Response Main Ideas and Summary Activities
    and assumptions Choose an ad with a distinct audience and goal Be sure to discuss the rhetorical situation surrounding the ad the magazine or paper in which it was featured the creators its purpose beyond just selling the product This is an important distinction to make for example we never just buy orange juice for orange juice s sake there is always a greater appeal to the ideas of freshness

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/interpretive_response_jackson.htm (2015-10-15)
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  • A Storyteller's Misguided Guide to Focus
    bold you could take a kind of scolding tone with this mini lecture Then midstream begin to digress Tell them something that happened over the weekend Or take them on a cruise through your tortuously enervating day Or tell them in gruesome detail the story of your efforts to get a driver s license at the Department of Motor Vehicles Be excruciatingly detailed and chronological In other words take them on a ride completely off track You can be amusing at first but eventually just be downright longwinded boring and off task Stop before you have either a riot or a full class of nappers on your hands but don t stop a minute before you re sure you ve lost them When you start to see the whites of their eyes wake them up with a solid thump of your book dropping onto the table Ask them What was I talking about and why A few who actually fell asleep during your epic may be terrified briefly but their hearts will be pounding and they ll be ALL EARS A bold one might say You were boring us to tears In any case don t leave them in the

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/misguided_doe.htm (2015-10-15)
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  • The Cut- ‘n- Paste Race for Organization and Unity
    not a published or extremely polished one make four copies of it and cut it at the paragraphs Make sure that you maintain one intact copy of the paper so that you know the proper order of the paragraphs Shuffle the paragraphs and randomly number them Place the numbered and loose paragraphs into an envelope taking care not to order them in any way Break the class into four groups and tell them this is a race The first group to complete the task you re about to give them wins a piece of candy or cookies or some small prize Remember if you re handing out food to give everybody SOMETHING or you ll have some very sad students at the end of the game Maybe give the winners two cookies and everybody else one Now the task is for each group to assemble the essay in its proper order If the paper is 15 paragraphs long or more this activity will take them a while especially if the transitions are fairly weak Roam around the room and check on their progress Give updates about the groups that are getting close Decide how much time you want to devote

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/cutnpaste_doe.htm (2015-10-15)
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  • Logical Fallacies Activity
    As a group activity have students sell a product using as many fallacies as they can Encourage students to go overboard here to make the fallacies as outrageous and therefore transparent as possible While or after each group presents the other class members should try to identify the fallacies An option is to keep score and award a prize to the team naming the most fallacies or naming them the

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/fallacies_jackson.htm (2015-10-15)
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  • Showing-Not-Just-Telling Activity
    of showing not just telling Present students with a scenario about which they will need to show the rest of the class and not just tell it For example one group could be presented with the scenario of moving into the dorms How could they get the rest of the class to see the experience rather than just telling them what it was It is also very effective to accompany

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/activities/showing_jackson.htm (2015-10-15)
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