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  • Composition Teaching Resources
    the Complete List of Teaching Guides Planning a Class Leading a Discussion Using Student Peer Review Designing Writing Assignments Evaluating Writing Assignments Helping Students Generate a Topic Teaching Detail and Development Helping Students Narrow a Topic Helping Students Summarize and Respond to Texts Teaching Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities An Intro to Teaching CO130 An Intro to Teaching CO300 An Intro to Teaching CO301A An Intro to Teaching CO301B

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/comparchive/teaching.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Why Students Plagiarize and What to do if You are Suspicious
    Authors Contributors Why Students Plagiarize and What to do if You are Suspicious Instructors often suspect plagiarism when they note obvious changes in the quality of a student s work such as style vocabulary and content These changes serve as an indicator that a student might have plagiarized either intentionally or unintentionally For example students might attempt to paraphrase to convey information obtained from research but fail to cite their sources Or they might fail to identify passages as quotations when they are conducting research for a writing project and later treat the passage as though it were a paraphrase In still other cases students will knowingly attempt to pass off the work of other writers as their own Students often feel the need to cheat or plagiarize when they don t understand an assignment or concept or when they don t have the time to adequately prepare for turning in an assignment Dornan et al 145 Offering ample time in class for questions or doing one on one conferences outside of class with students can help alleviate this feeling However students often cheat and plagiarize because it s easy or they think they won t get caught Regardless of

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/plagiarism/why.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Conferencing and Using Questions
    Plagiarism Proof Assignments Strategies for a Writing Classroom Postscripts for Writing Projects Research Process Additional Links Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Conferencing and Using Questions You might set up a conference time with the student and ask him or her to bring complete sources and rough drafts so that together you can compare drafts and the use of sources Harris suggests asking specific questions about the content of the paper What do you mean here by the phrase or In what sense are you using the word He also provides examples of questions that you can ask about sources during a conference Tell me how you researched and wrote this paper What process did you use Where did you look for your sources Which libraries or databases did you consult Where did you find this article Can you bring me a copy at the next meeting Harris 97 Lastly Harris suggests asking specific questions about the context of a quotation or a student s overall opinion of a book 97 Whichever method of questioning you choose a non aggressive approach and allowing room for the student to tell the truth will help make the conference most successful on all counts

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/plagiarism/conferencing.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Detective Work
    these could be indication of confusion on the student s behalf but they could also be mixed direct copying of sources To the same end be sure that each source cited in the body of the paper is cited in the Works Cited or References Page Also check the URL s provided if they don t work it could be an indication that the paper is very dated or that the sources don t exist at all Harris 62 3 Internet Detection When teaching a large lecture it can be impossible to monitor students writing and research processes One way to keep track of paper integrity is it use the Internet Since the availability of papers to be bought from the Internet and the ease of cut and paste is something our students are familiar with be Internet savvy yourself Keir Harris suggests using the Google Plus Four method Find a four word phrase that appears to be unique to the paper or paragraph you suspect Next take the phrase to Google and perform an exact phrase search by typing the phrase into the search window and surrounding it with quotation marks If the paper is available online it will usually come up in the search He also suggests Findsame at www findsame com HowOriginal at www howoriginal com EssayCrawler at www essaycrawler com and EssayFinder at www essayfinder com Along the same lines Keir also suggests using online scanning mills like Turnitin www turnitin com Plagiaserve www plagiaserve com or Glatt Plagiarism Services www plagiarism com INDEX HTM to determine if a paper has been copied or bought Plagiarism Detection Programs Particularly for large lecture classes a plagiarism detector program can be useful Harris includes many of these in The Plagiarism Handbook A few examples are Plagiarism org www

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/plagiarism/detective.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Strategies for Preventing Plagiarism
    Edition is to advise students to cite anything they did not specifically know before they began research 594 For example a student may have an idea before beginning a project that more than half of underage college students have consumed alcohol but if through research s he discovers that precisely 72 of underage students have consumed alcohol that information would need to be properly cited During the research process be

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/plagiarism/strategies.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Discussing Plagiarism
    the most effective strategies for preventing plagiarism intentional or not is to discuss the concept of plagiarism with your students Early in the semester maybe the second week ask your students to describe or define plagiarism This could be done in a Write to Learn activity that precedes a class discussion You may find that student conceptions of plagiarism are very different from academia s or your own However discussing these conceptions with your students provides the opportunity for you to clarify misunderstanding and to reinforce why plagiarism is unacceptable An open discussion also allows students to engage with the concept of plagiarism instead of merely having it imposed upon them it helps create an atmosphere in the classroom that is conducive to learning and academic integrity After discussing the concept everyone can be clear about the expectations concerning plagiarism That way a student is never caught off guard if the issue arises and moreover students can be held accountable for maintaining academic integrity since they are aware of the expectations set for them Starting the Discussion You can use the following Write to Learn to jumpstart your discussion about plagiarism Example Take 5 minutes to answer the following questions

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/plagiarism/discuss.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Establishing and Enforcing Consequences
    the best way to start but you also must enforce them Of course we only want to confront a student when we have concrete evidence of plagiarism But sometimes the first step is simply talking with the student Dornan et al suggest questioning students about methods used or understanding of the citation process 147 Approaching students from an inquisitive stance instead of a condemning one will keep students off the

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/plagiarism/consequences.cfm (2015-10-15)
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  • Encouraging Academic Integrity
    Academic Integrity CAI also supports the shared responsibility of academic integrity The CAI points to the 10 Principles of Academic Integrity created by Donald McCabe and Gary Pavela Affirm the importance of academic integrity Foster a love of learning Treat students as ends in themselves Promote an environment of trust in the classroom Encourage student responsibility for academic integrity Clarify expectations for students Develop fair and relevant forms of assessment

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/plagiarism/integrity.cfm (2015-10-15)
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