archive-edu.com » EDU » C » COLOSTATE.EDU

Total: 1507

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Process Analysis
    The Process of Writing an Evaluation Choosing a Topic for Evaluation Brainstorming Possible Judgments Defining Criteria Collecting Evidence Applying Criteria Organizing the Evaluation Writing the Draft Guidelines for Revision Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Academic Evaluations Process Analysis I n scientific or investigative writing in which experiments are conducted and processes or phenomena are observed or studied evaluation plays a part in the writer s discussion

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=947&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Source Evaluation
    censorship from an anti censorship perspective you will want to include in your research sources which also address the pro censorship side In this way your essay will be able to fully address perspectives other than and sometimes in opposition to your own Credibility One of the questions you want to ask yourself when you consider using a source is How credible will my audience consider this source to be You will want to ask this question not only of the source itself the book journal magazine newspaper home page etc but also of the author To use an extreme example for most academic writing assignments you would probably want to steer clear of using a source like the National Enquirer or like your eight year old brother even though we could imagine certain writing situations in which such sources would be entirely appropriate The key to determining the credibility of a source author is to decide not only whether you think the source is reliable but also whether your audience will find it so given the purpose of your writing Currency of Publication Unless you are doing research with an historical emphasis you will generally want to choose sources which have been published recently Sometimes research and statistics maintain their authority for a very long time but the more common trend in most fields is that the more recent a study is the more comprehensive and accurate it is Accessibility When sorting through research it is best to select sources that are readable and accessible both for you and for your intended audience If a piece of writing is laden with incomprehensible jargon and incoherent structure or style you will want to think twice about directing it toward an audience unfamiliar with that type of jargon structure or style

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=948&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Considering Purpose and Audience
    Choosing a Topic for Evaluation Brainstorming Possible Judgments Defining Criteria Collecting Evidence Applying Criteria Organizing the Evaluation Writing the Draft Guidelines for Revision Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Academic Evaluations Considering Purpose and Audience W e typically think of values as being personal matters But in our writing as in other areas of our lives values often become matters of public and political concern Therefore it is important when we evaluate to consider why we are making judgments on a subject purpose and who we hope to affect with our judgments audience Purposes of Evaluation Y our purpose in written evaluation is not only to express your opinion or judgment about a subject but also to convince persuade or otherwise influence an audience by way of that judgment In this way evaluation is a type of argument in which you as a writer are attempting consciously to have an effect on your readers ways of thinking or acting If for example you are writing an evaluation in which you make a judgment that Mountain Bike A is a better buy than Mountain Bike B you are doing more than expressing your approval of the merits of

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=949&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Effects of Audience
    but I care about taste and safe food handling To write an effective evaluation you need to figure out what your readers care about and then match your criteria to their concerns Similarly you can overwhelm readers with too much detail when they don t have the background knowledge to care about that level of detail Or you can ignore the expertise of your readers at your peril and not give enough detail Then as a writer you come across as condescending or worse So targeting an audience is really key to successful evaluation In written evaluation it is important to keep in mind not only your own system of value but also that of your audience Writers do not evaluate in a vacuum Giving some thought to the audience you are attempting to influence will help you to determine what criteria are important to them and what evidence they will require in order to be convinced or persuaded by your evaluative argument In order to evaluate effectively it is important that you consider what motivates and concerns your audience Criteria and Audience Considerations The first step in deciding which criteria will be effective in your evaluation is determining which criteria your audience considers important For example if you are writing a review of a Mexican restaurant to an audience comprised mainly of senior citizens from the midwest it is unlikely that large portions and fiery green chile will be the criteria most important to them They might be more concerned rather with quality of service or availability of heart smart menu items Trying to anticipate and address your audience s values is an indispensable step in writing a persuasive evaluative argument Your next step in suiting your criteria to your audience is to determine how you will explain and

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=950&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Parts of an Evaluation
    Choosing a Topic for Evaluation Brainstorming Possible Judgments Defining Criteria Collecting Evidence Applying Criteria Organizing the Evaluation Writing the Draft Guidelines for Revision Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Academic Evaluations Parts of an Evaluation W hen we evaluate we make an overall value claim about a subject using criteria to make judgments based on evidence Often we also make use of comparison and contrast as strategies

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=951&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Overall Claim
    evaluator s final decision about worth When we evaluate we make a general statement about the worth of objects goods services or solutions to problems An overall claim or judgment in an evaluation can be as simple as See this movie or Brand X is a better buy than the name brand It can also be complex particularly when the evaluator recognizes certain conditions that affect the judgment If citizens of our community want to improve air and water quality and are willing to forego 300 additional jobs then we should not approve the new plant Acme is hoping to build here Qualifications An overall claim or judgment usually requires qualification so that it seems balanced If judgments are weighted too much to one side they will sometimes mar the credibility of your argument If your overall judgment is wholly positive your evaluation will wind up sounding like propaganda or advertisement If it is wholly negative you might present yourself as overly critical unfair or undiplomatic An example of a qualified claim or judgment might be the following Although La Cocina is not without its faults it is the best Mexican restaurant in town Qualifications are almost always positive additions to evaluative arguments but writers must learn not to overuse them If you make too many qualifications your audience will be unable to determine your final position on your subject and you will appear to be waffling Example Text Creating more parking lots is a possible solution to the horrendous traffic congestion in Taiwan s major cities When a new building permit is issued each building must include a certain number of spaces for parking However new construction takes time and results will be seen only as new buildings are erected This solution alone is inadequate for most of Taiwan

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=952&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Supporting Judgments
    Draft Guidelines for Revision Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Academic Evaluations Supporting Judgments I n academic evaluations the overall claim or judgment is backed up by smaller more detailed judgments about aspects of a subject being evaluated Supporting judgments function in the same way that reasons function in most arguments They provide structure and justification for a more general claim For example if your overall claim or judgment in your evaluation is Although La Cocina is not without its faults it is the best Mexican restaurant in town one supporting judgment might be La Cocina s green chile is superb This judgment would be based on criteria you have established and it would be supported by evidence Example Text Providing more parking spaces near buildings is not the only act necessary to solve Taiwan s parking problems A combination of more parking spaces increased fines and lowered traffic volume may be necessary to eliminate the nightmare of driving in the cities In fact until laws are enforced and fines increased no number of new parking spaces will impact the congestion seen in downtown areas Comment There are arguably three supporting judgments being made here as three

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=953&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Criteria
    Criteria Types of Criteria Using Clear and Well defined Criteria Criteria and Audience Considerations How Background Experience Influences Criteria Evidence Comparison and Contrast The Process of Writing an Evaluation Choosing a Topic for Evaluation Brainstorming Possible Judgments Defining Criteria Collecting Evidence Applying Criteria Organizing the Evaluation Writing the Draft Guidelines for Revision Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Academic Evaluations Criteria W hen we write evaluations we consciously adopt certain standards of measurement or criteria Criteria can be concrete standards like size or speed or can be abstract like practicality When we write evaluations in an academic context we typically avoid using criteria that are wholly personal and rely instead on those that are less subjective and more likely to be shared by the majority of the audience we are addressing Choosing appropriate criteria often involves careful consideration of audience demands values and concerns As an evaluator you will sometimes discover that you will need to explain and or defend not only your judgments but also the criteria informing those judgments For example if you are arguing that a Mexican restaurant is excellent because among other reasons the texture of the food is appealing you might need

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=954&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
    Open archived version from archive