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  • Organizing the Evaluation
    Analysis Source Evaluation Considering Purpose and Audience Effects of Audience Parts of an Evaluation Overall Claim Supporting Judgments Criteria Evidence Comparison and Contrast The Process of Writing an Evaluation Choosing a Topic for Evaluation Brainstorming Possible Judgments Defining Criteria Collecting Evidence Applying Criteria Organizing the Evaluation Placement of the Overall Claim or Judgment Organization by Criteria Organization by Comparison and Contrast Organization by Chronological Order Organization by Causal Analysis Pattern of Classical Oration for Evaluations Example Part of an Outline for an Evaluation Writing the Draft Guidelines for Revision Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Academic Evaluations Organizing the Evaluation O ne of the best ways to organize your information in preparation for writing is to construct an informal outline of sorts Outlines might be arranged according to criteria comparison and contrast chronological order or causal analysis They also might follow what Robert K Miller and Suzanne S Webb refer to in their book Motives for Writing 2nd ed as the pattern of classical oration for evaluations 286 In addition to deciding on a general structure for your evaluation it will be necessary to determine the most appropriate placement for your overall claim or judgment Previous Continue

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=977&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing the Draft
    Possible Judgments Defining Criteria Collecting Evidence Applying Criteria Organizing the Evaluation Writing the Draft Guidelines for Revision Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Academic Evaluations Writing the Draft I f you have an outline to follow writing a draft of a written evaluation is simple Stephen Reid in his Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers recommends that writers maintain focus on both the audience they are addressing

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=985&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
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  • Guidelines for Revision
    guidelines are reproduced here and grouped as follows Examining Criteria Criteria are standards of value They contain categories and judgments as in good fuel economy good reliability or powerful use of light and shade in painting Some categories such as price have clearly implied judgments low price but make sure that your criteria refer implicitly or explicitly to a standard of value Examine your criteria from your audience s point of view Which criteria are most important in evaluating your subject Will your readers agree that the criteria you select are indeed the most important ones Will changing the order in which you present your criteria make your evaluation more convincing Reid 342 Balancing the Evaluation Include both positive and negative evaluations of your subject If all of your judgments are positive your evaluation will sound like an advertisement If all of your judgments are negative your readers may think you are too critical Reid 342 Using Evidence Be sure to include supporting evidence for each criterion Without any data or support your evaluation will be just an opinion that will not persuade your reader If you need additional evidence to persuade your readers go back to the Collecting stage of this process Reid 343 Avoiding Overgeneralization Avoid overgeneralizing your claims If you are evaluating only three software programs you cannot say that Lotus 1 2 3 is the best business program around You can say only that it is the best among the group or the best in the particular class that you measured Reid 343 Making Appropriate Comparisons Unless your goal is humor or irony compare subjects that belong in the same class Comparing a Yugo to a BMW is absurd because they are not similar cars in terms of cost design or purpose Reid 343 Checking for

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=986&guideid=47 (2015-10-15)
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  • Audience Definition
    for an Audience Writing Purpose Details to Consider Readers versus Audience Appealing to an Audience Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Adapting to Your Audience Audience Definition A n audience is a group of readers who reads a particular piece of writing As a writer you should anticipate the needs or expectations of your audience in order to convey information or argue for a particular claim Your

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=325&guideid=19 (2015-10-15)
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  • Types of Audiences
    Academic Audiences Analyzing Non Academic Audiences Writing for an Audience Writing Purpose Details to Consider Readers versus Audience Appealing to an Audience Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Adapting to Your Audience Types of Audiences A udiences come in all shapes and sizes They may be a group of similar people or combinations of different groups of people You ll need to determine who they are in

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=326&guideid=19 (2015-10-15)
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  • Determining your Audience Type
    an Audience Writing Purpose Details to Consider Readers versus Audience Appealing to an Audience Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Adapting to Your Audience Determining your Audience Type W riters determine their audience types by considering Who they are age sex education economic status political social religious beliefs What Level of Information they have about the subject novice general reader specialist or expert The Context in which

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=327&guideid=19 (2015-10-15)
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  • Three Categories of Audience
    Editing and Audience Awareness Assumptions about Audience Analyzing an Audience Audience Analysis Formal verses Informal Analyzing Academic Audiences Analyzing Non Academic Audiences Writing for an Audience Writing Purpose Details to Consider Readers versus Audience Appealing to an Audience Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Adapting to Your Audience Three Categories of Audience Michel Muraski Journalism and Technical Communication Department Three categories of audience are the lay audience the managerial audience and the experts The lay audience has no special or expert knowledge They connect with the human interest aspect of articles They usually need background information they expect more definition and description and they may want attractive graphics or visuals The managerial audience may or may not have more knowledge than the lay audience about the subject but they need knowledge so they can make a decision about the issue Any background information facts or statistics needed to make a decision should be highlighted The experts may be the most demanding audience in terms of knowledge presentation and graphics or visuals Experts are often theorists or practitioners For the expert audience document formats are often elaborate and technical style and vocabulary may be specialized or technical source

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=328&guideid=19 (2015-10-15)
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  • Academic Audiences
    Analysis Formal verses Informal Analyzing Academic Audiences Analyzing Non Academic Audiences Writing for an Audience Writing Purpose Details to Consider Readers versus Audience Appealing to an Audience Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Adapting to Your Audience Academic Audiences A ssuming you are writing a paper for a class ask yourself who is the reader The most important reader is probably the instructor even if a grader will look at the paper first Ask yourself what you know about your teacher and his or her approach to the discipline Do you know for example if this teacher always expects papers to be carefully argued Has this teacher emphasized the importance of summarizing cases accurately before referring to them Will this professor be looking for an argument synthesis showing how the cases all support one point or will this prof be more interested in seeing how the cases complicate one another In other words take the time to brainstorm about what you ve learned about the teacher to help you meet his or her expectations for this paper You probably know more about the teacher than you think and asking questions about how the teacher treats this material

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=329&guideid=19 (2015-10-15)
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