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  • Leave yourself 10 minutes at the end of the test period to re-read
    Answering Exam Questions Leave yourself 10 minutes at the end of the test period to re read S ometimes students feel too pressed for time to review anything Generally teachers will tell you that you re better served by writing the more important responses clearly and completely than by finishing every last question So take some time to re read and revise parts of your responses Teachers are generally willing to follow arrows to inserted points or read sentences in a certain order if you number them these revision strategies can help you fill in detail and order the sentences in your responses for maximum clarity However it s a tactical mistake to re read responses just after you write them Sometimes the ideas are still too fresh in your mind to see if the response is clear Finishing the test and coming back to re read gives you several advantages If you ve misunderstood the question you re more likely to see that after you work through the entire test because the test questions as a whole typically have a logic that connects them in some way Re reading the questions carefully will help you see if you ve

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1039&guideid=50 (2015-10-15)
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  • Final advice
    the key word or words call for Describe Analyze Compare Evaluate Argue Explain Define Generalize List Reflect Discuss Make notes to yourself of the points you want to cover in the response Begin your response by echoing the question Leave yourself 10 minutes at the end of the test period to re read Final advice Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Answering Exam Questions Final advice M uch of the success on an essay test comes not during the test time but in the preparation time If you know the material you ll be able to generate your lists and notes quickly to help you write complete answers If you fully understand the theory that a test question asks you to apply then you ll be able to make coherent connections between theory and application If you understand the specialized terminology being covered on a test you will not only understand the questions more quickly but you ll be able to use the jargon appropriately to write professional responses Teachers know when students are padding responses to avoid answering a question so writing skills can t carry you through a testing situation if you don t know

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1040&guideid=50 (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing for the Web
    and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Revising Arguments Show Descriptions Writing Guides Reviewing and Revising an Argument Writing Activities Reviewing How You ve Incorporated Proof into An Argument Revising Coherence in the Argumentative Essay Revising the Title Lead in and Thesis Revising Your Argumentative Claim Supporting Argumentative Claims Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=62 (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing for the Web
    and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Writing Arguments Show Descriptions Writing Guides Drafting an Argument Parts of an Argument Planning an Argument The Toulmin Method Writing Arguments An Overview Writing Activities Collecting Ideas for an Argument Cubing Argue For Against From Collecting to Shaping an Argument Narrowing from Topic to Thesis for an Argumentative Essay Supporting Argumentative Claims Unpacking an Argumentative Thesis Statement Working with Claim

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=31 (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing for the Web
    who want to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Analyzing Audience Show Descriptions Writing Guides Adapting to Your Audience Writing Activities Analyzing a Target Publication Analyzing a Written Text Audience Analyzing an Academic Audience Revising Literature Papers Audience Rhetorical Analysis Reader Understanding Your Audience Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=71 (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing for the Web
    to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Considering Audience Show Descriptions Writing Guides Adapting to Your Audience Understanding Writing Situations Writing Activities Analyzing a Target Publication Analyzing a Written Text Audience Analyzing an Academic Audience Brainstorming Revising Literature Papers Audience Rhetorical Analysis Reader Understanding Your Audience Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=22 (2015-10-15)
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  • Writing for the Web
    Web This collection of resources is designed to support and help writers who want to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Understanding Writing Situations Show Descriptions Writing Guides Understanding Writing Situations Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web site supported by Colorado State University

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=19 (2015-10-15)
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  • Formal vs. Informal Arguments
    Formal vs Informal Arguments The difference between a formal and an informal argument is in the burden of proof A formal argument clearly states the claim or position it argues and presents a well developed chain of evidence leading to a reasonable conclusion supporting the claim The chain of evidence itself may include a wide variety of elements ranging from personal experience to statistical data and expert testimony Informal arguments contain little or no supportive evidence I did the dishes last night may be all that s necessary to encourage your roommate to do them tonight but it s hardly an argument designed to convince or persuade Its primary purpose is merely to assert or point something out nothing more Informal arguments are the stock in trade of radio and TV talk shows op ed pages and letters to the editor Generally speaking they re used to instigate discussion among individuals holding different opinions Quite often they are used to provoke a confrontation between those who flat out disagree with each other e g The O Reilly Factor and The Jerry Springer Show Seldom do they end in a consensus of opinion or a reasonable conclusion Previous Continue Introduction Tweet

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1080&guideid=53 (2015-10-15)
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