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  • When an Audience Partially Disagrees...
    an Audience Partially Disagrees When an Audience is Completely Unfamiliar When Original Research Forms the Basis Tying it All Together Toulmin Method Using Subheadings and Transitions Using Topic Sentences or Explanatory Paragraphs Example of When Methods are Combined Reviewing and Revising Your Connections Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Drafting an Argument When an Audience Partially Disagrees When an audience partially disagrees with your position the best strategy still looks a great deal like when they completely disagree convincing them that their reasoning is faulty before presenting your own position Introduction States the issue to be addressed and why it is important Body of Argument Examines positions already proposed and refutes each one showing why they are inadequate Typically organized like this Position 1 Your refutation of position 1 Position 2 Your refutation of position 2 Alternatively all positions might be examined first and then refuted second Position 1 Position 2 Your refutation of position 1 Your refutation of position 2 Position Statement Introduced as the only logical choice after the positions your audience finds most persuasive are shown to be inadequate Presentation of Evidence Supports your position as not only reasonable but the best one available

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1204&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • When an Audience is Completely Unfamiliar...
    When Seemingly Unrelated Sub Points When Opposing Arguments Inductive Method When an Audience Completely Disagrees When an Audience Partially Disagrees When an Audience is Completely Unfamiliar When Original Research Forms the Basis Tying it All Together Toulmin Method Using Subheadings and Transitions Using Topic Sentences or Explanatory Paragraphs Example of When Methods are Combined Reviewing and Revising Your Connections Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Drafting an Argument When an Audience is Completely Unfamiliar When an audience is completely unfamiliar with the issue presenting evidence and leading to a logical conclusion may be the best choice because you are informing the audience while simultaneously proving the position Introduction States the issue to be addressed and why it is important Body of Argument Presents the different work done on the issue and the conclusions reached Logical Connections Looks at how conclusions reached in the research fit together leading to a particular answer to the problem or position on the issue An alternative arrangement would include connections between each conclusion presented and proven Conclusion Position Statement ends the argument with your position as the only logical choice Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1205&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • When Original Research Forms the Basis...
    Disagrees When an Audience is Completely Unfamiliar When Original Research Forms the Basis Tying it All Together Toulmin Method Using Subheadings and Transitions Using Topic Sentences or Explanatory Paragraphs Example of When Methods are Combined Reviewing and Revising Your Connections Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Drafting an Argument When Original Research Forms the Basis When original research forms the basis for an argument particularly in the sciences the study itself and the results must be discussed before a conclusion or interpretation of the data can be discussed It must be made obvious to the audience that your position emerges from the research rather than being one you are ensuring the research will support A deductive arrangement starting with the conclusion or position implies that the research may be biased Introduction States the issue to be addressed and why it is important Research questions Describes study and the issue problem or question it was designed specifically to answer Methods Describes in detail the methods employed in the study Results Summarizes and provides a detailed presentation of findings Conclusion Position Statement Argues for a particular interpretation of the results which leads to a conclusion addressing or answering the

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1206&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • Tying it All Together
    or Explanatory Paragraphs Example of When Methods are Combined Reviewing and Revising Your Connections Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Drafting an Argument Tying it All Together American methods of academic argument are best depicted as a straight line No matter what be it evidence sub points refutations of other positions or personal anecdotes everything used must lead clearly back to the position being argued Although the

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1207&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • Toulmin Method
    About this Guide Contributors Citation Drafting an Argument Toulmin Method One of the best ways to demonstrate why a given piece of evidence supports the thesis claim or position of an argument is to explain the reasoning process by which they are logically connected In the Toulmin method these explanations are referred to as warrants First for each claim that is debatable or open to question a reason is offered

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1208&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • Using Subheadings and Transitions
    this Guide Contributors Citation Drafting an Argument Using Subheadings and Transitions Chunking text into sections according to where a new point is being made a new reason in support of your thesis is offered or a new opposing argument is being addressed helps establish coherence among the various parts of your argument Using sub headings to label these different sections will help the audience follow your argument In addition transitions

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1210&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • Using Topic Sentences or Explanatory Paragraphs
    When Methods are Combined Reviewing and Revising Your Connections Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Drafting an Argument Using Topic Sentences or Explanatory Paragraphs Another good way to help an audience follow the logic of your argument is to use of topic sentences literally telling them how each point relates to the claim clearly connecting them so that there isn t any question how or why they

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1212&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • Example of When Methods are Combined
    know that working too much affects family time and thus family structure we usually assume that this is the case only for people who work 40 hours a week Studies of how work related stress influences family time however suggest that too much work even within what is considered normal has detrimental effects on family time Topic sentence connects evidence studies to the point that 40 hour work weeks have negative affects on families For example in Smith s 1987 study of 15 average middle class families he describes the undue pressure a 9 5 schedule puts on families In particular he notes that this time schedule translates to at least three forms of unnecessary family stress 1 rushed mornings where parents desperately try sticking to a rigid time schedule that gets the children off to school and themselves to work between the hours of 7 and 9 2 financial pressure of paying babysitters or day care facilities during school holidays and the 2 or 3 hours after school while parents are still at work 3 overly frantic weekends where since many businesses close at 5 00 all errands must be done before then Note how the author highlights only the parts of the study that influence family pressures The stresses Smith documents are not in families where parents work 60 70 hours a week The parents working 40 hours a week are secretaries mechanics bank employees etc The effects on them he notes clearly translate to less time spent with family members because of work demands as well as increased pressure when the family is together Warrant explaining why proof shows the problem is the 40 hour work week discussed in the initial point made Such pressures can t help but influence the quality of time the family spends

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1215&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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