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  • Reviewing and Revising Your Connections
    margin every time you change focus even slightly These changes may or may not come at regular intervals one section might take three paragraphs while another takes only one When you are finished ask the following questions Do similar points come up in different sections If so put them together Are any sections only a few sentences long Are they relevant If so expand them if not cut them out Can you define the relationship each section has to the position being argued How is each one relevant Look at your revised argument and create a list of reasons that connect each section to the position being argued Those that don t should be cut Save this list the reasons you have identified will make excellent transitions between argument sections Can you explain why section 2 follows section 1 and so on If not consider how sections might be moved around so that you have a clear reason for why each one follows another Make another list including these reasons Consider using them as transitions between argument sections as well Get Some Peer Review Have a friend or several friends read through your argument Ask them to mark where they get lost or are not sure of your point or where you are going next These are places where rearrangement or clearer transitions are probably necessary Also try reading the argument aloud to yourself and your friends Frequently when you hear an argument out loud you can pinpoint where its logic doesn t add up Changes can then be made Cut and Paste Cut and paste Play around with your organizational structure Literally cut your paper into paragraphs and then make piles out of those which have things in common If only part of a paragraph does then cut some

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1216&guideid=56 (2015-10-15)
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  • A Clearly Stated Position
    Provide Context for the Argument Establish Credible Authority Compel the Audience to Listen Establish Common Ground Clarify or Define a Problem The Argument Presentation of Evidence Acceptable Academic Evidence Acceptable Field Specific Academic Evidence Refuting Opposing Positions Using a Counter Example Outlining an Opposing Position Appealing to the Audience The Conclusion Reflecting Your Introduction Summarizing Key Points Logical Synthesis Evaluating the Solution Call to Action Emotional and Ethical Appeals Citations Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Parts of an Argument A Clearly Stated Position By definition an argument requires the existence of a debatable issue In other words for an argument to even take place there must be at least two sides When two or more arguable positions exist each constitutes part of the context The audience those to whom your position will be argued constitute another part of the context And since it will contain both supporters and detractors it is essential that your position be clearly stated It is the foundation upon which each brick of your evidence will be stacked and must be strong enough to bear its own weight as well as the onslaught of opposing arguments Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1083&guideid=54 (2015-10-15)
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  • Types of Positions
    The Introduction Provide Context for the Argument Establish Credible Authority Compel the Audience to Listen Establish Common Ground Clarify or Define a Problem The Argument Presentation of Evidence Acceptable Academic Evidence Acceptable Field Specific Academic Evidence Refuting Opposing Positions Using a Counter Example Outlining an Opposing Position Appealing to the Audience The Conclusion Reflecting Your Introduction Summarizing Key Points Logical Synthesis Evaluating the Solution Call to Action Emotional and Ethical Appeals Citations Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Parts of an Argument Types of Positions Position statements fall into categories and those categories suggest how a claim should be argued Your position knowledge and authority on the subject will help you decide which category best suits the argument s purpose Before selecting one however consider your audience Which side are they likely to be on or will they be split down the middle How informed are they Where lays the largest difference of opinion Is the issue emotionally charged If so how will the audience react The answers you come up with will help determine what type of position will be most effective and what to include in the introduction the type of evidence to be presented

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1084&guideid=54 (2015-10-15)
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  • Identify Your Position
    Problem The Argument Presentation of Evidence Acceptable Academic Evidence Acceptable Field Specific Academic Evidence Refuting Opposing Positions Using a Counter Example Outlining an Opposing Position Appealing to the Audience The Conclusion Reflecting Your Introduction Summarizing Key Points Logical Synthesis Evaluating the Solution Call to Action Emotional and Ethical Appeals Citations Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Parts of an Argument Identify Your Position A clearly stated position demands parameters or boundaries narrow enough to avoid any tangential digression that might detract from the argument s power In other words to be effective the author must identify a narrow enough position that proving or drawing a conclusion from the argument that follows won t become bogged down in the side bar arguments a broader statement might stimulate The key to identifying a clear position is in the old adage of not biting off more than you can chew In a courtroom it s called opening the door to testimony previously excluded A broad position statement invites disaster by opening doors to counter arguments that you are unprepared for and have no intention of addressing It muddies the argument Following are some examples of position statements that are too

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1089&guideid=54 (2015-10-15)
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  • Draft Your Position Statement
    issues that interest you and don t worry about defining your position A good topic is one that arouses passion in others as well as yourself Consult your course notes and make a list of ideas that appear to have the most potential by answering a few simple questions What questions did your instructor ask the class to think about What topics sparked the most spirited class discussion What question created the greatest disagreement the most heated debate What topics or questions divide the local national or global community Step Two Do some broad preliminary research on your selected topic Ask your instructor as well as others in your field of study for information and guidance To grasp the complexities and nuances of the issues at hand select a group of books and articles that approach your topic from different angles and study up on them Step Three Note your reactions and opinions as they occur and develop or mature In particular you will want to note when previously held opinions change as a result of knowledge and insight gained from recent readings or discussion Hone in on those opinions about which your feel the strongest or interest you the most Step Four Begin drafting a preliminary statement Keep in mind that your position must be arguable When shaping it consider the following questions Is there an ongoing debate regarding the issue If not it may be that a consensus of opinion has already been reached The absence of debate indicates that either 1 there is nothing about which to argue or 2 the issue is brand new and ripe for argument Has the issue been exhaustively debated If so the sides may be so polarized that further argument is pointless The absence of a consensus of opinion indicates that

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1093&guideid=54 (2015-10-15)
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  • The Introduction
    Audience to Listen Establish Common Ground Clarify or Define a Problem The Argument Presentation of Evidence Acceptable Academic Evidence Acceptable Field Specific Academic Evidence Refuting Opposing Positions Using a Counter Example Outlining an Opposing Position Appealing to the Audience The Conclusion Reflecting Your Introduction Summarizing Key Points Logical Synthesis Evaluating the Solution Call to Action Emotional and Ethical Appeals Citations Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Parts of an Argument The Introduction Getting off to a good start can make or break you which is why your introduction is so important It must be both respectful of the audience not all of whom are going to be on your side and compelling enough for them to withhold judgment while hearing you out Think about throwing a dinner party Your guests are the audience You plan a menu and set the table Before you serve the entrée you serve an appetizer and introduce those who are meeting for the first time Your introduction should put your guests on common ground at ease with each other before the main course your argument is served When dinner is over your argument made your guests stay on for coffee and dessert

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1094&guideid=54 (2015-10-15)
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  • Provide Context for the Argument
    Compel the Audience to Listen Establish Common Ground Clarify or Define a Problem The Argument Presentation of Evidence Acceptable Academic Evidence Acceptable Field Specific Academic Evidence Refuting Opposing Positions Using a Counter Example Outlining an Opposing Position Appealing to the Audience The Conclusion Reflecting Your Introduction Summarizing Key Points Logical Synthesis Evaluating the Solution Call to Action Emotional and Ethical Appeals Citations Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Parts of an Argument Provide Context for the Argument The introduction establishes an argument s context it informs the audience of the issue at hand the prevailing arguments from opposing sides and the position held by the author It sets the tone for the argument and establishes the disciplinary constraints and boundaries that your particular academic audience will expect There are many ways to provide context for an audience but the main thing is to get everyone on an equal footing a starting point where everyone has equal knowledge of the issue One of the best ways to accomplish this is by proposing a common definition of the issue Another is to begin with a literature review of past work showing where and how your position has emerged from

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1095&guideid=54 (2015-10-15)
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  • Establish Credible Authority
    Refuting Opposing Positions Using a Counter Example Outlining an Opposing Position Appealing to the Audience The Conclusion Reflecting Your Introduction Summarizing Key Points Logical Synthesis Evaluating the Solution Call to Action Emotional and Ethical Appeals Citations Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Parts of an Argument Establish Credible Authority Establishing credibility and authority is just as important to you as a student as it is to credentialed

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1100&guideid=54 (2015-10-15)
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