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  • Yourself
    this Guide Contributors Citation Planning an Argument Yourself What about the issue or topic intrigues you the most Why do you care Do you already have a position Are you convinced it is correct Are you leaning one way or the other or are you undecided What about the issue do you already know What do you need to find out What kind of research is involved What kind of

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1148&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Your Audience
    the issue are they likely to be on Are you preaching to the choir or is the audience divided What will convince them to hear you out Are they sympathetic and trusting or skeptical and full of questions What does the audience already know about the issue Are they experts in the field or new to the topic How much information will they need What kind of evidence does your

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1149&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Your Issue or Topic
    this Guide Contributors Citation Planning an Argument Your Issue or Topic What about your issue or topic has the discipline already argued to death What has been left unresolved open for discussion or further examination What lines of inquiry are most important or urgent What information will be considered common knowledge How far has current research carried the conversation What kind of evidence has already been presented Are you adding

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1150&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Your Presentation
    Argument Your Presentation How does your academic discipline expect you to state your position Must you begin with it or can it wait till the end Must it answer a research question or can you simply take and explore a stance What kind of introduction is expected Must you be completely objective How should you present evidence What documentation style should you use What about organization Are there disciplinary conventions

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1151&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Context
    lot that goes into writing an argument all of which fit somewhere under the general heading CONTEXT meaning the elemental concerns that define an argument s appropriateness and play a part in its construction contribute to the shaping of its message and affect its meaning The importance of examining these elements stems from the fact that individual academic disciplines having different methods for interpreting and examining the world around them have different expectations and conventions regarding how research is to be conducted the findings reported the arguments written and the sources documented What constitutes a viable research question or acceptable evidence in one discipline may be inappropriate in another In an English class a question about the human condition might be answered by interpreting the works of Shakespeare In a psychology class a case study or a controlled experiment would be more likely The tone and style of presentation and its organization are also affected Consider the following two introductions below for arguments addressing the treatment of patients with Alzheimer s disease Lower division courses are a bit more relaxed when it comes to writing for specific disciplinary audiences but if you are writing for possible publication or for an

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1152&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Analyzing Context
    Because Statements Organize by Pros and Cons Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Planning an Argument Analyzing Context The best way to analyze the context of an argument is by subdividing the task and examining it from different contextual perspectives writer audience issue or topic and language style At the end of your examination you will be better informed and better able to pick and argue a

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1155&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Analyzing Assignments
    Analyzing the Audience Organizing an Argument Organize by Evidentiary Strength Organize by Because Statements Organize by Pros and Cons Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Planning an Argument Analyzing Assignments Although most academic writing is argumentative particularly published writing it may not be your professor s intention Many times the goal of an assignment is to prove that you understand a concept or material discussed either in

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1163&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Analyzing the Audience
    Models Consider Your Academic Discipline Sample Audience Analysis Example One Sample Audience Analysis Example Two Organizing an Argument Organize by Evidentiary Strength Organize by Because Statements Organize by Pros and Cons Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Planning an Argument Analyzing the Audience Whether comprised of one individual or many an argument is always written to an audience so it makes little sense to begin without first figuring who the audience is and what they want or expect This can be done with a little analysis As a concept it sounds pretty simple Think about who is going to read your argument and why and then write in a manner that will most help them comprehend the position you are taking Easier said then done It turns out that writing and revising for a particular audience is much harder than you think It requires audience awareness and analysis The first thing you will need to find out is why the instructor is having you write the paper and to whom Sometimes you will be asked to write as if to a larger audience but for most assignments you will be writing to your professor an audience of

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1185&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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