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  • Organizing an Argument
    Organize by Pros and Cons Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Planning an Argument Organizing an Argument Formal methods for organizing and presenting an argument have existed in Western culture since before the time of Aristotle One of the oldest is still in use today Organized along the lines of ancient classical rhetoric it has six parts An Introduction establishing the author as knowledgeable and trustworthy and the issue as one worthy of debate A Brief Narrative providing context and background A Position Statement containing a thesis or claim and an outline of the reasons that support taking the position The Argument Itself containing the supportive evidence backing each reason the position is being taken Refutations that invalidate the opposing arguments A Conclusion summarizing the argument and reflecting back on or reiterating key points made in the introduction Just because it s ancient doesn t mean it s carved in stone however there are other ways to organize an argument Some people begin by writing up everything they are going to include and organizing later others work out the order for each section ahead of time Either way when the time comes it s probably best to

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1191&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Organize by Evidentiary Strength
    all the evidence that favors your position and then look at it through their eyes What will they find most persuasive What will they find most authoritative What will they find least debatable Rank your evidence from the most persuasive and authoritative to the least Organize your argument according to these rankings either begin with the least persuasive and build to the most incontrovertible or begin with the most persuasive

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1192&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Organize by 'Because' Statements
    Assignments Analyzing the Audience Organizing an Argument Organize by Evidentiary Strength Organize by Because Statements Organize by Pros and Cons Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Planning an Argument Organize by Because Statements This is a simple way to outline the essential reasons for taking or defending a position Make a list of answers that satisfy the question around which your position is focused For instance a list of because statements for the claim Grades should be abolished in non major courses might look like this because grades encourage students to choose easy courses because grades get in the way of learning because low grades hurt the chances of getting a good job because non major students shouldn t be held to the same standards as majors Do you see how easy it will be to turn this list into sections of an argument Each because statement becomes a sub claim or section that can be connected logically to each other If properly supported with credible evidence each can contribute to a persuasive argument with which to convince your audience that your position is the correct one Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1193&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Organize by Pros and Cons
    of pros and cons all the reasons for and all the reasons against the position you are going to argue Organize this list from strongest to weakest for and against Shuffle them around On the pro side which should go first Should the strongest be at the beginning or the end Where and how should you refute or rebut the cons Do any of the pros counter the cons Choose

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1194&guideid=55 (2015-10-15)
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  • Reviewing Your Position
    the most common student remarks in argument drafting workshops is Now that I ve written the whole paper my position or claim has changed Be sure to take the time to review and revise your position statement so that it reflects the exact claim you support in your argument The Structure of Your Claim After you ve drafted your argument you ll know if you re relying on cause effect because statements or pro con strategy Make sure that the structure of your claim reflects the overall structure of your argument For example a first draft claim Fraternity hazing has serious negative effects on everyone involved can be revised to reflect the cause effect reasoning in the rest of the argument because hazing causes psychological trauma to victims and perpetrators fraternity hazing is much more serious than an initiation prank Word Choice in Your Claim Quite often an early draft of a claim makes a broader or more general point than an argument can actually support or prove As you revise consider where you might limit your claim Narrow the cases your claim applies to or state more precisely who is affected by a problem or how a solution can be implemented Challenging each word in a claim is a good way to be sure that you ve stated your claim as narrowly and as precisely as possible Look also for loaded words that might carry negative connotations Be sure to consider their effect on your target audience Your Claim as a Roadmap An audience uses the claim to help anticipate what will appear in the rest of the argument You want to revise your claim so that it makes the most sense in light of the argument that follows Note obvious exceptions to your position right in the claim

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1218&guideid=57 (2015-10-15)
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  • Reviewing Your Audience Analysis
    your argument through the eyes of the audience Here are several strategies that can help Role Playing Become the Audience Put the argument aside and make up a list of questions your audience might ask about the issue Try to role play the way you assume they might think Enlist other people s help with this list Then return to the paper and see if these questions have been answered Profile the Audience Write a quick audience profile What does your audience believe to be true What kinds of proof will they find most persuasive What do they already think about the issue Then look back at your draft to see if you ve supplied the kind of evidence likely to persuade your audience and whether you ve addressed what they already think If not consider replacing or adding further evidence and refuting positions you have not included Play Devil s Advocate Read through your argument as if you don t believe a single word Look at each reason and the pieces of evidence you present and list any objections that could be made Then look at your objections and judge which of these your audience might hold Revise to

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1219&guideid=57 (2015-10-15)
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  • Reviewing Your Evidence
    got a working draft of your argument you want to make sure that you have adequate support for all your claims The best way to do this is to go through your argument sentence by sentence circling all the claims you have made List them on a sheet of paper and ask whether it is a claim with which any member of your audience might disagree Under each claim list

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1220&guideid=57 (2015-10-15)
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  • Familiar Sources
    from Original Field Research Original Field Research as One of Many Forms of Evidence Only a Small Part of Work is Relevant Multiple Sources Tangential Evidence Resources Print Friendly Format About this Guide Contributors Citation Reviewing and Revising an Argument Familiar Sources When relying on sources with which the audience is familiar an article book or study for instance providing a lot of detail in the content isn t always necessary It s fair enough to make a simple generalization place a proper citation in parentheses or a footnote Similarly if you are relying on multiple studies that make the same point a single sentence might be used to summarize the point all the works share followed by a citation listing numerous studies and articles For example As numerous studies have shown students tend to revise more when writing on a computer Selfe Hawisher and Selfe Kiefer Palmquist Note This advice may not apply to course assignments Many times teachers want to assess your understanding of the content As a result they will expect details Check with your instructor about how much knowledge you are allowed to assume on the part of your audience Previous Continue Introduction Tweet HELP SITE

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1221&guideid=57 (2015-10-15)
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