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  • Warning: On Copying Unique Phrasing or Terminology
    On Copying Unique Phrasing or Terminology When paraphrasing or summarizing avoid copying the unique phrasing or terminology found in your source material Many students have been charged with plagiarism for using words that are clearly too sophisticated or well crafted to be their own For instance you would not want to refer to the textual resistant narrative that counteracts the narrative supremacy of the dominant social text 1 when writing an essay about the novel Wide Sargasso Sea unless your instructor is aware that you are at an advanced stage of thinking in the field of literary criticism and is familiar with and used to seeing that kind of writing style from you Such language includes terminology bound to raise the proverbial red flag when your instructor reads your work He or she is more likely than not to be familiar with your source and if not will discover in short order the critical work of Fiona Barnes When struck by particularly impressive or compelling phrasing it is better to quote and document it rather than represent it as your own in a paraphrase or summary 1 Fiona R Barnes Dismantling the Master s Houses Jean Rhys and West Indian

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=316&guideid=17 (2015-10-16)
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  • Penalties for Plagiarism and Your Legal Rights
    and is both prosecuted and punished at every credible institution in the world At Colorado State University failure to do your own work in COCC150 or any other course for that matter or to plagiarize in any way is a failure to meet course requirements and is a violation of long established CSU policy regarding Academic Integrity The penalties for plagiarism depend upon the degree of gravity Should you be found guilty the least is an F on a paper Failing an entire course is also possible and in cases where the charges are graver expulsion from the university Should you be suspected of plagiarism at CSU you will be notified in writing The charges may be disputed in a meeting with the Director of Composition however if the matter is not resolved your case will be handled according to the guidelines set forth in the General Catalog and the handout on Student Rights and Responsibilities It s important for you to know that fair and impartial treatment is your right and that due process is guaranteed Regardless of the outcome your case will be held in strict confidence in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=317&guideid=17 (2015-10-16)
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  • Using Goals to Shape a Lesson
    Friendly Page Authors Contributors Using Goals to Shape a Lesson Begin planning a lesson by considering your goals In addition to keeping in mind the overall goals for the course consider the specific goals for that lesson Ask yourself what you want your students to gain most from the lesson Often you ll come up with a list of two or three goals for the class A successful lesson will

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/goals.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Planning Transitions
    When writing transitions ask yourself what is the significance of each of these activities How do they connect to the daily goals Why did I arrange them in this order Is there a more logical way to organize these procedures Be sure to write out transition statements in your lesson plans so you don t find yourself grappling for explanations on the spot If you can t explain the significance

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/transitions.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Planning Introductions
    students see that you have a sense of where the lesson is headed Not only will this add to your credibility but students will be less inclined to ask Why do we have to do this Use introductions to connect concepts from earlier classes to the upcoming lesson Also use them as checkpoints or reminders for yourself and your students this is where we ve been and this is where

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/introductions.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Planning Classroom Discussions
    Discussion Using Write to Learns Group Activities Reflecting on Lessons Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Planning Classroom Discussions Instructors like to believe that if students are awake and engaged in conversation it s a cause for celebration But there s more to consider You may witness a spectacular discussion on the effects of teen magazines on youth culture or the implications of cyborgs in science fiction novels but at some point you need to ask How do these discussions help students become better writers When planning a discussion consider your daily goals Ask yourself what do I want students to gain from this discussion How will it contribute to the overall goal for the lesson How does it connect to students own writing Shape your outline or discussion plan to reflect the daily goals Discussions happen for different reasons Perhaps you re leading a discussion to introduce a new concept or assignment Maybe you re critiquing a sample essay or looking closely at an assigned reading Whatever the situation you ll want to consider your role as well as the goals Taken together these provide a starting point to give shape to your classroom discussions Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/discussions.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Planning to Introduce a New Concept or Assignment
    you are describing the writing situation for an essay it is useful to engage students by asking questions that encourage them to reflect on their own knowledge For example when introducing audience as a rhetorical concept you might ask Who did you think of as your audience when you completed your assignment for today How did you make choices based on that audience At some point though students will begin

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/new.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Planning to Model or Critique Student Samples
    Samples Leading a Discussion Using Write to Learns Group Activities Reflecting on Lessons Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Planning to Model or Critique Student Samples The goals for these types of discussions are clearly connected to students own writing You are showing them how concepts discussed in class translate into a particular type of writing Or you are determining whether a writing sample meets the criteria for an assignment During these discussions you ll want to guide students with questions like What s effective about this piece of writing But don t hesitate to point out the problems areas in the sample Discussions about writing should be student centered but you also need to provide clear judgments If an essay has some serious problems be sure students are aware of this when they leave When planning highlight places where an essay is effective or ineffective If students do not raise the same concerns point these out for them Your goal for these discussions is to have students walk away with a greater sense of what to focus on and what to avoid in their own writing Suggestions for modeling effective writing Suggestions for critiquing sample writing Tweet HELP SITE INDEX

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/samples.cfm (2015-10-16)
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