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  • Planning to Lead a Discussion on an Assigned Reading
    you are using an author s ideas to generate ideas for students writing or pulling main ideas from a text and arranging them into an academic summary You might want to determine whether or not a writer s choices are effective You ll want to ask yourself when planning these discussions What features of a text should we focus on in order to meet the daily goal If the goal is to teach students summary skills your discussion questions should be geared to accommodate this You might create questions that ask students to define a writer s purpose and locate the main ideas In most cases though discussions will be dynamic taking into account multiple purposes and goals Your text course outline or syllabus may include discussion questions as starting points Use these as a guide but also practice developing your own If you are teaching students how to write a good essay write out a list of questions that you think are relevant to an essay Then look back at the daily goals and select those that best reflect these goals Arrange discussion questions in a logical order but also plan to be flexible Make a list of things that must be covered Create a hierarchy of questions but try not to insist on a particular order discussions usually do not follow a linear path Rather think about how questions connect to one another This way you can adapt during discussions Unfortunately students won t always provide the insightful responses we dream of Anticipate where your questions may receive shallow answers and plan to engage students with questions like Interesting can you give a specific example for that Or can anyone take what Tony just said a go a bit further with it Also think about how you might

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/reading.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Planning Write to Learns
    Discussion Using Write to Learns Group Activities Reflecting on Lessons Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Planning Write to Learns Write to Learns WTL are short writing exercises intended to help students collect their thoughts start a discussion or reflect on an assignment As with most activities consider your goals when planning a WTL What do you want students to most gain from the WTL Your questions or prompts should clearly reflect this If the goal is to have students evaluate a text ask them to analyze the effectiveness of something rather than react to the main ideas If the goal is to engage students ideas and evaluate a text plan questions that address both goals Have students react to ideas first then ask them to evaluate the author s use of evidence to support these ideas Think about how a WTL fits into your lesson How does it connect with other activities How might you use it to focus students thoughts for a discussion or another activity You can put WTL prompts on the board display them on an overhead projector or post them on your class Web site When to use Write to Learns Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/wtl.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Planning Group Activities
    of composition we value lectures and discussions but we also believe that writers benefit from collaborating and sharing ideas with other writers For this reason we encourage you to try different strategies for planning group activities When planning group activities think about your goals Then design very clear and precise tasks to meet these goals You should provide detailed instructions Avoid complex language and confusing directions If students don t

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/group.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Reflecting on Lessons
    the end of your lesson plans where you can jot down brief notes on the following What went well Which activities or discussions would you like to use again next time you teach this course What didn t work How might you change a discussion or an activity to make it more effective next time Did you get through all of the material for the lesson If not how might

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/reflect.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Contributors to this Guide
    Class Using Goals Transitions Introductions Conclusions Discussions New Concept Assignment Using Student Samples Leading a Discussion Using Write to Learns Group Activities Reflecting on Lessons Print Friendly Page Authors Contributors Contributors to this Guide Content Development Kerri Eglin HTML Coding Jill Salahub Design and ColdFusion Programming Mike Palmquist Jill Salahub Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web site supported by Colorado

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/planning/contrib.cfm (2015-10-16)
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  • Writing for the Web
    the Web This collection of resources is designed to support and help writers who want to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Writing Poetry Show Descriptions Writing Guides Using Descriptive Detail Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web site supported by Colorado State University

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=34 (2015-10-16)
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  • Writing for the Web
    Web This collection of resources is designed to support and help writers who want to design and code Web sites as well as understand how to write effective and interesting content for them Writing for the Web Category Poetry Writing Practice Activities Show Descriptions Writing Activities Brainstorming Freewriting Tweet HELP SITE INDEX ABOUT THIS SITE CONTACT Writing CSU is an open access educational Web site supported by Colorado State University

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/collections/collection.cfm?collectioncategory_active=57 (2015-10-16)
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  • Purposes for Poster Sessions
    poster determine important elements of the poster itself Professional Posters Inform and Argue When a professional presents original research the goal of the poster is twofold Not only should the poster present the data and findings uncovered in the research but the poster also presents an argument for the validity and importance of the research Although the argument seems secondary it s a key factor in helping the writer decide what material to include in the poster The fastest growing variation of the professional poster session is the Internet session Professionals prepare posters about their original work and post them on the Web Instead of walking around viewing others posters at a conference participants of the virtual poster session view others posters online Electronic forums then allow participants and other audiences to ask questions of the poster authors In the sample linked below notice that the text is considerably longer than the authors could include on a physical poster but the virtual poster eliminates the space problem that a physical posterboard imposes General Posters Inform The other major type of poster the informational poster is typically shaped more by its audience than by its purpose When a poster session is

    Original URL path: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1521&guideid=78 (2015-10-16)
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