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  • The Undergraduate German Program at Columbia University
    Languages 414 Hamilton Hall Mail Code 2812 1130 Amsterdam Ave New York NY 10027 Tel 212 854 3202 Fax 212 854 5381 E mail germanic columbia edu Deutsches Haus 420 West 116th Street between Amsterdam Ave and Morningside Dr German

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/german/programs/german/undergrad-german/index.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • About the Graduate German Program at Columbia University
    after the written exam and lasts one hour It is directed by two examiners It is intended to test how students in a more spontaneous setting engage with more specific questions concerning literary history M Phil Exam The function of the M Phil Exam is not to test a broad exposure to German literary history as with the M A Exam but instead to test students on their ability to isolate an area of research The exam is intended to help students bridge the transition to the dissertation stage by identifying a set of research interests and a preliminary dissertation interest In preparation for the exam students are expected to develop two or three reading lists one of which must be a theoretical field Students are expected to be able to define the bounds of their project and argue why they have made those distinctions They are expected to be able to articulate the theoretical positions that inform their methodology Students must not only be able to defend why they have made certain choices but also why they have excluded others Finally students are expected to situate their project within both the historical context of their field of interest and the bodyof relevant scholarship that surrounds it In order to take the exam students are expected to produce two or three M Phil reading lists depending on the nature of their proposed area of study Students must also complete 8 courses 5 for letter grade credit and 3 for R credit 5 of these 8 courses have to be taken in the Department of Germanic Languages for students admitted with advanced standing 6 out of 8 At least 3 of the letter grade credits must be acquired through seminar papers The other two can be met through shorter paper formats or take home exams The deadline for the M Phil Exam is the end of semester 7 There will be one advising session for the M Phil Exam to be held at the end of the second year after the M A Exam has been completed The M Phil Exam consists in a take home exam to be completed over the course of one weekend and a 90 minute oral examination Both the take home and the oral exam are directed by two examiners chosen by the student The take home portion of the exam covers the student s major field the oral portion of the exam covers all three fields Dissertation The dissertation prospectus contains a bibliography of relevant primary and secondary works and a relatively detailed overview over the proposed topic The prospectus should give a working title for the thesis and each of its chapters Wherever possible precise information about chapter topics existing critical debates and the student s particular line of argument should be included The prospectus has to be defended before the end of semester 8 in a meeting with the first and second readers who will usually be the examiners for the M Phil

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/german/programs/german/grad-german/index.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • PhD Student Placement for the Department of Germanic Languages at Columbia University
    Our Address Department of Germanic Languages 414 Hamilton Hall Mail Code 2812 1130 Amsterdam Ave New York NY 10027 Tel 212 854 3202 Fax 212 854 5381 E mail germanic columbia edu Past Graduate Student Placement Webmaster Sitemap Columbia University

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/german/programs/german/grad-german/grad-placement.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Faculty of the Department of Germanic Languages at Columbia University
    Ave and Morningside Dr Faculty Professors Mark Anderson Director of Deutsches Haus Stefan Andriopoulos Director of Undergraduate Studies Jeremy Dauber Yiddish Andreas Huyssen Dorothea von Mücke Department Chair Harro Müller Associate Professors Erk Grimm Barnard College Oliver Simons Director of Graduate Studies Assistant Professors Tobias Wilke On leave Distinguished Visiting Max Kade Professor Eva Geulen rotating Die Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main Eva Horn Universität Wien Senior Lecturers Wijnie de

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/german/people/faculty.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Affiliated Faculty of the Department of Germanic Languages at Columbia University
    Languages 414 Hamilton Hall Mail Code 2812 1130 Amsterdam Ave New York NY 10027 Tel 212 854 3202 Fax 212 854 5381 E mail germanic columbia edu Deutsches Haus 420 West 116th Street between Amsterdam Ave and Morningside Dr Affiliated

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/german/people/affiliated-faculty.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • The Yiddish Program at Columbia University
    Germanic Languages 414 Hamilton Hall Mail Code 2812 1130 Amsterdam Ave New York NY 10027 Tel 212 854 3202 Fax 212 854 5381 E mail germanic columbia edu Deutsches Haus 420 West 116th Street between Amsterdam Ave and Morningside Dr

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/german/programs/yiddish/index.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Department of Germanic Languages at Columbia University
    Why Study German Requirements for majors and concentrators Study abroad opportunities German Graduate Program About Admission Recent Dissertations Graduate Placement Swedish Yiddish About Resources Undergraduate Graduate Curriculum Faculty Links A Few Words in Yiddish People Faculty Mark Anderson Stefan Andriopoulos Jeremy Dauber Andreas Huyssen Dorothea von Mücke Harro Müller Erk Grimm Oliver Simons Tobias Wilke Richard Korb Jutta Schmiers Heller Irene Motyl Mudretzkyj Wijnie de Groot Tiina Haapakoski Agnieszka Legutko

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/german/se_sitemap/sitemap.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Columbia University MA in History and Literature
    The Practices of the Enlightenment Aesthetics Authorship and the Public Columbia University Press 2015 APPLY NOW online HILI APPLICATION About the Program Columbia University s M A in History and Literature is an innovative new program that explores the interconnections and intersections between history and literature both as categories of cultural production and as scholarly disciplines In the past thirty years the boundaries between history and literature have become usefully blurred as literary scholars pursued the historical aspects of their texts and historians recognized the literary aspects of their narratives The M A in History and Literature capitalizes on this propitious intellectual moment enabling its students to address new methodological horizons that combine close reading of texts with expansive attention to historical context The program is held at Columbia s Global Center for Europe located at Reid Hall in the sixth arrondissement in Paris Students are taught by eminent scholars in history and literature from Columbia University and also choose from a wide variety of courses at France s two top tier graduate schools in the humanities and the social sciences the Ecole normale supérieure and the Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales An important part of the program is the consideration of literature itself as a field of moral philosophical sociological and historical knowledge Students develop a sophisticated awareness of theoretical and methodological issues They also acquire the philological tools required for the interpretation of texts in print or manuscript form This practical training includes hands on sessions conducted at the Bibliothèque nationale de France and the Archives nationales de France We expect many students to have an interest in French history and literature but we also welcome students who wish to work on materials in other languages M A courses are taught in English or French Written work is normally done in English Why History and Literature There has been a convergence between the academic disciplines of history and literature in the past thirty years Literary studies have become increasingly historical while history has had its linguistic turn The dialogue between literature and history has taken many different forms In literary studies there has been a re evaluation of the traditional field of literary history with greater attention paid to the historical evolution of genres and styles Now that a large corpus of literary texts is available and searchable online the use of words and expressions in given contexts can be traced over time in great detail which has led to a revival of philology as a key component of literary studies A great deal of attention is paid to the concrete conditions in which texts were written This means looking at philosophical rhetorical or poetic traditions as well as material conditions including the educational and social milieu and the material constraints involved in committing something to writing Historians have taken in the notion that history is a literary genre and are aware of the interplay between archival material and historical imagination There has been a remarkable

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/historyandliterature/ (2016-02-12)
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