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  • Affiliated Events
    the Columbia University Medical Center Campus Time 10a m Directions Click here for more information Contact and and please see web site to check for cancellations Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Schedule Cognitive Neuroscience Division Schedule Top NYU Social Neuroscience Seminar Time Visit the website below Location NYU Department of Psychology 6 Washington Place New York NY 10003 Contact 212 998 7900 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Schedule NYU Psychology Department welcomes inquiries about their Psychology talks via telephone and their website NYU Colloquium Series Top Business School Management Seminar Website Click here to view Time 12 30 p m on Tuesdays Location Uris Hall Room 332 Directions Click here to view the Columbia Business School on a map Theme The Management Division Seminar features weekly presentations from distinguished visitors as well as the division s own faculty Contact or Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Use the contacts above for more information on the Business School Management Seminar Series Top Business School Decision Sciences Seminar Website Click here to view Time See website Location See website Directions Click here to view the Columbia Business School on a map Directors Eric Johnson Elke U Weber Contact Join Mailing List Click here to sign up

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/news/affiliatedtalks/index.html (2016-02-12)
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  • faculty
    investigating the behavioral and neuropharmacological effects of psychoactive drugs in human research participants A major focus of this laboratory based research is to understand factors that mediate drug self administration behavior and to develop effective treatments Relevant Publications Colfax G Santos GM Chu P Vittinghoff E Pluddemann A Kumar S Hart C 2010 Amphetamine group substances and HIV T he Lancet 376 458 74 Kirkpatrick MG Gunderson EW Johanson CE

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/fac-bios/HartC/faculty.html (2016-02-12)
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  • faculty
    based rejection In her current work she is exploring people s expectations of rejection and their impact on the perception of other people s behavior in anticipation of and following social encounters Her work has focused on the personality disposition of rejection sensitivity RS and on its association with responses to rejection as well as efforts made to prevent it This line of work has led her to study sensitivity to rejection based on personal unique characteristics as well as sensitivity to rejection based on group characteristics such as race and gender She has sought to investigate the effect of rejection sensitivity on people s behavior by utilizing various techniques including established social cognition paradigms experimental studies physiological recordings brain imaging and diary studies Recently Dr Downey has been using the knowledge acquired from her research on rejection to develop models of personality and attachment disorders She has also been interested in the study of identity specifically on the way in which individuals use their multiple social identities strategically to cope with daily stressors Relevant Publications Downey G Mougios V Ayduk O London B Shoda Yuichi 2004 Rejection sensitivity and the defensive motivational system Insights from the startle response to

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/fac-bios/Downey/faculty.html (2016-02-12)
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  • faculty
    Ph D Columbia University 1973 General Area of Research Motivation social cognition judgment decision making self regulatory biases vulnerabilities Current Research Current research addresses the general question Where does value come from The classic answer to this question is that value comes from the hedonic experiences the pleasures and pains associated with some activity or object The Higgins lab is examining another source of value experience how strongly one is engaged in something Strength of engagement can be increased or decreased by several different factors In one research program the Higgins lab has shown that engagement strength increases when there is a fit between the manner in which people pursue a goal and their current motivational state during the goal pursuit This regulatory fit increases the intensity of the response to something whether that response is positive or negative The implications of regulatory fit in particular and engagement strength in general are being examined in the areas of negotiation decision making person perception interpersonal relationships persuasion and performance Relevant Publications Higgins E T 2006 Value from hedonic experience and engagement Psychological Review Higgins E T Idson Chen L Freitas A L Spiegel S and Molden D C 2003 Transfer of

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/fac-bios/Higgins/faculty.html (2016-02-12)
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  • faculty
    personality inferences Current Research Self Emotion Regulation Current research efforts aim to a explore the psychological physiological brain and genetic mechanisms that underlie adaptive self emotion regulation and b understand how these factors impact people s real world behaviors and experiences in their efforts to self regulate under hot emotion arousing conditions Along with our collaborators we use a host of paradigms e g longitudinal diary lab based experimental correlational and methods e g self report narratives implicit autonomic fMRI to address these questions freely crossing disciplinary boundaries in areas that span personality social cognition developmental and cognitive neuroscience with continuing support by NIMH Merit Awards 1989 2009 Personality Processes and Dynamics In a separate but related line of inquiry members of our lab are actively involved in research exploring the structure consistency and stability of personality In this vein current research projects focus on developing methods of profiling and examining the predictable situation specific contingencies e g she does X when A but Y when B that constitute peoples unique behavioral signatures Students who are interested in learning more or would like to get involved in any aspect of this research are encouraged to contact for more information Relevant

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/fac-bios/Mischel/faculty.html (2016-02-12)
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  • faculty
    behavioural techniques to examine the neurobiological systems that coordinate fear in humans Our theoretical stance rests on the long standing view that fear is an evolutionarily favorable response whereby increasingly unambiguous threat leads to a cascade of defensive responses that can be dichotomized as slow thoughtful actions vs fast instinctive reactions A second stream of research aims to determine the neural proxies that underlie social cognition Previous research has surveyed the neural basis of vicarious reward competition altruism and social emotions such as envy We are currently pursuing questions of how social behavior orchestrates and shapes emotion and how such operations are variably disrupted in psychiatric disorders Please see the Lab website for more details Relevant Publications Mobbs D Hassabis D Yu R Chu C Rushworth M Boorman E Dalgleish T 2013 Foraging under competition The neural basis of input matching in humans Journal of Neuroscience 33 9866 9872 Schweizer S Grahn J Hampshire A Mobbs D Dalgleish T 2013 The neural substrates underlying cognitive gains in working memory and transfer effects onto the cognitive control of emotions Journal of Neuroscience 33 5301 5311 Feldman Hall O Dalgleish T Thompson R Evans D Schweizer S Mobbs D 2012 Differential Neural Circuitry and Self Interest in Real versus Hypothetical Moral Decisions Social Cognitive and Affect Neuroscience 7 7 743 751 Mobbs D Yu R Rowe J FeldmanHall O Dalgleish T 2010 Neural activity associated with monitoring the oscillating threat value of a Tarantula Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 107 47 20582 6 Mobbs D Meyer M Yu R Passamonti L Seymour B J Calder A J Schweizer S Frith C D Dalgleish T 2009 A key role for similarity in vicarious reward Science 324 900 Takahashi H Kato M Matsuura M Mobbs D Suhara T Okubo Y 2009

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/fac-bios/MobbsD/faculty.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Monday Seminar
    Monday Seminar Printed Version Page Links Fall 2015 Spring 2016 Time Mondays 12 00pm 1 30pm Location 200B Schermerhorn Theme A forum for discussing research on topics of interest in behavioral neuroscience cognitive and social psychology neuroscience ranging from perception learning memory and reasoning to social cognition interpersonal relations stereotypes and self regulation Open to graduate students post doctoral researchers and faculty Contact Please send comments or questions to Matti Vuorre and Mark Conley Fall 2015 9 14 2015 Tory Higgins Columbia University How Value Truth and Control Motives Working Together Produce Happiness Morality 9 21 2015 Greg Jensen Columbia University 9 28 2015 Tessa West New York University 10 05 2015 Cate Hartley Sackler Institute Cornell University 10 12 2015 No Seminar 10 19 2015 Michael Gilead Columbia University 10 26 2015 Joshua Jacobs Columbia University 11 9 2015 Courtney Cogburn School of Social Work Columbia University 11 16 2015 Daniel Ames Columbia Business School Columbia University 11 23 2015 Laurel Gabard Durnam Raphael Gerraty Columbia University 11 30 2015 First Year Talks 12 07 2015 First Year Talks Top Spring 2016 01 25 2016 Dan Simon University of Southern California Gould 02 08 2016 Tory Higgins Columbia University

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/news/areatalks/mondayseminar.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Groundbreaking Research | Columbia University in the City of New York
    shows an identified spinal neuron that relays sensory information about limb position Image provided by Dr Adam Hantman About History Administration Statistics Facts Visiting Admissions Schools Departments Financial Aid Areas of Study Academics Schools Departments Centers Areas of Study Research News Resources Centers Libraries Locations Catalogs E Resources Request It Ask a Librarian Services Medical Center Research Education Patient Care Newsroom Giving Impact Gift Guide Ways to Give Give Online

    Original URL path: http://www.columbia.edu/node/3191/slideshow/2.html (2016-02-12)
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