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  • Drew Brisbin ● Galaxy Lunch ● Cornell Astronomy
    Exploration Rovers MER Herschel Juno Research Highlights Nov 2014 Death Star moon may be wonky or watery May 2014 Plastic Wrong Way Dunes Arise On Saturn Moon Titan April 2014 Saturn moon reveals a cosmic crust covered sea April 2014 Undergraduate Roger Michaelides Mentioned in Planetary Society Blog CRSR Resources Cornell Links Journals and Newsletters Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Observational Databases Societies Observatories Cornell Astronomy Webmail Outreach Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home Events Galaxy Lunch Drew Brisbin Galaxy Lunch Colloquia Planetary Lunch Astrophysics Lunch Galaxy Lunch The Thomas Gold Lectureship Series The Salpeter Lectureship Series The Yervant Terzian Lectureship Series Special Events Summer 2014 Undergraduate Program Lectures Drew Brisbin 14 Friday Oct 14 12 20pm Space Sciences 622 Galaxy Lunch A toy model of star formation metallicity useful reading Mannucci et al 2010 Previous Events Previous Colloquia Previous Planetary Lunches Previous Galaxy Lunches Previous Astrophysics Lunches Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate Studies Welcome Graduate Overview A Typical Graduate Path How To Apply Grad Student Spotlight Recent PhD Spotlight Astronomy Graduate Network Student Guide to Cornell Astronomy Financial Support Cornell Graduate School Current Grad Student Spotlight Kassandra Anderson Joyce Byun Paul Corlies Megan Comins Matt Hankins Jason Hofgartner Dustin Madison Recent PhD Spotlight Betsey Adams Carl Ferkinhoff Jim Fuller Dan Tamayo Rebecca Harbison Phil Muirhead Laura Spitler Hartung Boothroyd Observatory

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/events/drew-brisbin.html (2015-05-22)
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  • Everett Schlawin ● Galaxy Lunch ● Cornell Astronomy
    Exploration Rovers MER Herschel Juno Research Highlights Nov 2014 Death Star moon may be wonky or watery May 2014 Plastic Wrong Way Dunes Arise On Saturn Moon Titan April 2014 Saturn moon reveals a cosmic crust covered sea April 2014 Undergraduate Roger Michaelides Mentioned in Planetary Society Blog CRSR Resources Cornell Links Journals and Newsletters Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Observational Databases Societies Observatories Cornell Astronomy Webmail Outreach Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home Events Galaxy Lunch Everett Schlawin Galaxy Lunch Colloquia Planetary Lunch Astrophysics Lunch Galaxy Lunch The Thomas Gold Lectureship Series The Salpeter Lectureship Series The Yervant Terzian Lectureship Series Special Events Summer 2014 Undergraduate Program Lectures Everett Schlawin 7 Friday Oct 7 12 20pm Space Sciences 622 Galaxy Lunch Kepler s coolest planet host stars metallicities radii temperatures from spectroscopic followup Previous Events Previous Colloquia Previous Planetary Lunches Previous Galaxy Lunches Previous Astrophysics Lunches Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate Studies Welcome Graduate Overview A Typical Graduate Path How To Apply Grad Student Spotlight Recent PhD Spotlight Astronomy Graduate Network Student Guide to Cornell Astronomy Financial Support Cornell Graduate School Current Grad Student Spotlight Kassandra Anderson Joyce Byun Paul Corlies Megan Comins Matt Hankins Jason Hofgartner Dustin Madison Recent PhD Spotlight Betsey Adams Carl Ferkinhoff Jim Fuller Dan Tamayo Rebecca Harbison Phil Muirhead Laura Spitler Hartung Boothroyd Observatory News

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/events/everett-schlawin.html (2015-05-22)
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  • Rocket launched into northern lights ● Spotlight on Astronomy ● Cornell Astronomy
    Distant Universe Missions Stardust NExT Cassini Mars Exploration Rovers MER Herschel Juno Research Highlights Nov 2014 Death Star moon may be wonky or watery May 2014 Plastic Wrong Way Dunes Arise On Saturn Moon Titan April 2014 Saturn moon reveals a cosmic crust covered sea April 2014 Undergraduate Roger Michaelides Mentioned in Planetary Society Blog CRSR Resources Cornell Links Journals and Newsletters Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Observational Databases Societies Observatories Cornell Astronomy Webmail Outreach Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home News Spotlight on Astronomy Rocket launched into northern lights News Categories Spotlight on Astronomy Rocket launched into northern lights February 27th 2012 Rocket launched into northern lights to reveal GPS effects As the brilliant colors of the aurora borealis or northern lights delights skygazers Cornell researchers are discovering how their physics affects satellite signals here on Earth Image Gallery Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate Studies Welcome Graduate Overview A Typical Graduate Path How To Apply Grad Student Spotlight Recent PhD Spotlight Astronomy Graduate Network Student Guide to Cornell Astronomy Financial Support Cornell Graduate School Current Grad Student Spotlight Kassandra Anderson Joyce Byun Paul Corlies Megan Comins Matt Hankins Jason Hofgartner Dustin Madison Recent PhD Spotlight Betsey Adams Carl Ferkinhoff Jim Fuller Dan Tamayo Rebecca Harbison Phil Muirhead Laura Spitler Hartung Boothroyd Observatory News Events Colloquia Planetary Lunch Astrophysics Lunch Galaxy

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/news/rocket-launched-into-northern-lights.html (2015-05-22)
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  • NASA Mars Rover Finds Mineral Vein Deposited by Water ● Spotlight on Astronomy ● Cornell Astronomy
    Stardust NExT Cassini Mars Exploration Rovers MER Herschel Juno Research Highlights Nov 2014 Death Star moon may be wonky or watery May 2014 Plastic Wrong Way Dunes Arise On Saturn Moon Titan April 2014 Saturn moon reveals a cosmic crust covered sea April 2014 Undergraduate Roger Michaelides Mentioned in Planetary Society Blog CRSR Resources Cornell Links Journals and Newsletters Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Observational Databases Societies Observatories Cornell Astronomy Webmail Outreach Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home News Spotlight on Astronomy NASA Mars Rover Finds Mineral Vein Deposited by Water News Categories Spotlight on Astronomy NASA Mars Rover Finds Mineral Vein Deposited by Water December 8th 2011 PASADENA Calif NASA s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found bright veins of a mineral apparently gypsum deposited by water Analysis of the vein will help improve understanding of the history of wet environments on Mars Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate Studies Welcome Graduate Overview A Typical Graduate Path How To Apply Grad Student Spotlight Recent PhD Spotlight Astronomy Graduate Network Student Guide to Cornell Astronomy Financial Support Cornell Graduate School Current Grad Student Spotlight Kassandra Anderson Joyce Byun Paul Corlies Megan Comins Matt Hankins Jason Hofgartner Dustin Madison Recent PhD Spotlight Betsey Adams Carl Ferkinhoff Jim Fuller Dan Tamayo Rebecca Harbison Phil Muirhead Laura Spitler Hartung Boothroyd Observatory News Events Colloquia Planetary

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/news/nasa-mars-rover-finds-mineral-vein-deposited-by-water.html (2015-05-22)
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  • Faster than the speed of light? ● Spotlight on Astronomy ● Cornell Astronomy
    wonky or watery May 2014 Plastic Wrong Way Dunes Arise On Saturn Moon Titan April 2014 Saturn moon reveals a cosmic crust covered sea April 2014 Undergraduate Roger Michaelides Mentioned in Planetary Society Blog CRSR Resources Cornell Links Journals and Newsletters Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Observational Databases Societies Observatories Cornell Astronomy Webmail Outreach Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home News Spotlight on Astronomy Faster than the speed of light News Categories Spotlight on Astronomy Faster than the speed of light November 15th 2011 This Thursday physics professors Julia Thom Eanna Flanagan and Yuval Grossman will host a forum for the public about the recent experimental results suggesting faster than light travel by neutrinos They will start by describing the experiment astrophysical constraints and the theoretical implications and then open the floor for questions and discussion The forum takes place at 7 30 pm on Thursday November 17 in 700 Clark Hall with refreshments beforehand starting at 7pm Everyone is invited Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate Studies Welcome Graduate Overview A Typical Graduate Path How To Apply Grad Student Spotlight Recent PhD Spotlight Astronomy Graduate Network Student Guide to Cornell Astronomy Financial Support Cornell Graduate School Current Grad Student Spotlight Kassandra Anderson Joyce Byun Paul Corlies Megan Comins Matt Hankins Jason Hofgartner Dustin Madison Recent PhD Spotlight Betsey Adams Carl Ferkinhoff

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/news/faster-than-the-speed-of-light.html (2015-05-22)
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  • Prof. Joseph Veverka to talk about Stardust-NExT ● Spotlight on Astronomy ● Cornell Astronomy
    Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home News Spotlight on Astronomy Prof Joseph Veverka to talk about Stardust NExT News Categories Spotlight on Astronomy Prof Joseph Veverka to talk about Stardust NExT November 10th 2011 Stardust NExT NASA s most traveled comet hunter Professor Joseph Veverka of Cornell University will speak at the 11 17 11 Colloquium 4 00PM Room 105 Space Sciences Bldg Cornell University on the successful results of the Stardust NExT mission Stardust NExT Stardust New Exploration of Tempel was an extended mission that utilized the already in flight Stardust spacecraft to fly by comet Tempel 1 on Feb 14 2011 and extended the investigation of that comet by the Deep Impact mission Note while the mission name has been changed to Stardust NExT the spacecraft will continue to be referred to as Stardust NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena Calif managed Stardust NExT for NASA s Science Mission Directorate Washington Cornell University New York is home to the mission s principal investigator Joe Veverka The spacecraft was built for NASA by Lockheed Martin Space Systems Littleton Colo The primary science objectives of the Stardust NExT mission were as follows To extend our understanding of the processes that affect the surfaces of comet nuclei by documenting the changes that have occurred on comet Tempel 1 between two successive perihelion passages To extend the geologic mapping of the nucleus of Tempel 1 to elucidate the extent and nature of layering and help models of the formation and structure of comet nuclei To extend the study of smooth flow deposits active areas and known exposure of water ice Document the surface changes on a comet s nucleus between successive perihelion passages Measure Tempel 1 s dust properties and compare with data taken from Comet Wild 2 Provide additional information on enigmatic layering and flow features discovered by the Deep Impact mission On board instruments will image the nucleus surface and jets count dust particles size and distribution during closest approach and composition of dust for further ground analysis Other Objectives If possible to characterize the crater produced by Deep Impact in July 2005 to better understand the structure and mechanical properties of cometary nuclei and elucidate crater formation processes on them Measure the flux and mass distribution of dust particles within the coma using the DFMI instrument Analyze the composition of dust particles within the coma using the CIDA instrument Monitor comet activity over 60 days on approach using imaging Research Staff Veverka Thomas Image Gallery Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/news/colloquium-speaker-prof-joseph-veverka-to-talk-about-stardust-next.html (2015-05-22)
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  • Not That Close! ● Spotlight on Astronomy ● Cornell Astronomy
    Observatories Cornell Astronomy Webmail Outreach Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home News Spotlight on Astronomy Not That Close News Categories Spotlight on Astronomy Not That Close November 8th 2011 An asteroid the size of a city block will zoom by Earth inside the orbit of the moon today Nov 8 but it poses no danger of smashing into our planet scientists say The asteroid 2005 YU55 which is about 1 300 feet 400 meters across will make its closest approach to Earth at 6 28 p m EST 2328 GMT today At that point the space rock will be traveling at about 29 000 mph and be about 201 700 miles 324 600 kilometers from Earth closer than the moon which orbits 238 864 miles 384 499 km from us on average The flyby will mark the closest such a big space rock has come to Earth since 1976 But there s no need to scurry down to the basement bunker to await an asteroid impact researchers say 2005 YU55 cannot hit Earth at least over the interval that we can compute the motion reliably which extends for several hundred years research scientist Lance Benner of NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory JPL in Pasadena Calif said in a recent NASA video Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate Studies Welcome Graduate Overview A

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/news/61-1.html (2015-05-22)
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  • Squyres Helps NASA Prepare for Asteroid Exploration ● Spotlight on Astronomy ● Cornell Astronomy
    NExT Cassini Mars Exploration Rovers MER Herschel Juno Research Highlights Nov 2014 Death Star moon may be wonky or watery May 2014 Plastic Wrong Way Dunes Arise On Saturn Moon Titan April 2014 Saturn moon reveals a cosmic crust covered sea April 2014 Undergraduate Roger Michaelides Mentioned in Planetary Society Blog CRSR Resources Cornell Links Journals and Newsletters Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Observational Databases Societies Observatories Cornell Astronomy Webmail Outreach Ask an Astronomer NASA New York Space Grant Consortium Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility SPIF Cornell Astronomical Society CAS Fuertes Observatory Friends of Astronomy Orion Newsletter Answers to Yervant s Critical Thinking Questions Opportunities Job Listings Home News Spotlight on Astronomy Squyres Helps NASA Prepare for Asteroid Exploration News Categories Spotlight on Astronomy Squyres Helps NASA Prepare for Asteroid Exploration October 28th 2011 Squyres Helps NASA Prepare for Asteroid Exploration Becoming an aquanaut Prof Steven Squyres astronomy plunged into the waters off Key Largo Fla on Oct 20 to help NASA prepare for the first ever asteroid exploration mission scheduled to take flight in 2025 Home People Faculty Academic Staff Staff Graduate Students in Astronomy and Space Sciences Graduate Students From Other Fields Undergraduates Former PhDs Faculty Emeritus Friends of Astronomy Academic Program Astronomy Courses Undergraduate Studies Arts Sciences Application Cornell Course Catalog Cornell Academic Calendar Cornell Financial Aid Research Opportunities for Undergrads REU Space Grant Current Openings Graduate Studies Welcome Graduate Overview A Typical Graduate Path How To Apply Grad Student Spotlight Recent PhD Spotlight Astronomy Graduate Network Student Guide to Cornell Astronomy Financial Support Cornell Graduate School Current Grad Student Spotlight Kassandra Anderson Joyce Byun Paul Corlies Megan Comins Matt Hankins Jason Hofgartner Dustin Madison Recent PhD Spotlight Betsey Adams Carl Ferkinhoff Jim Fuller Dan Tamayo Rebecca Harbison Phil Muirhead Laura Spitler Hartung Boothroyd Observatory News Events Colloquia

    Original URL path: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/news/squyres-helps-nasa-prepare-for-asteroid-exploration-1.html (2015-05-22)
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