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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Understanding Your Monthly Bill Should you need additional clarification of your bill please contact the Billing Department at 607 253 3951 The first page of your monthly bill is a summary of all of the testing and other activities that occurred on your account for the calendar month The top portion of the bill includes the following information the date the bill was generated your account number a credit card payment box next to your address our remit to address an overall summary of charges payments late fees and adjustments that occurred on your account during the month Returning this portion with your payment will ensure that your payment is applied to the correct account The charge category is a total of all test charges for the month The adjustment category is a total of non test charges for the month both accession and non accession related These charges include but are not limited to pricing adjustments supply charges and credits shipping charges The first line of detail below the tear line is the ending balance from the previous month if applicable Next will be a listing of adjustments made to your account that are not associated with submissions Charges for supplies ordered will appear here including the date that the supplies were shipped The next group of lines will represent the total by accession sub totaled by submitting veterinarian If you include an internal reference number on your submission form this number will appear the veterinarian and owner names The total for the accession

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/billing/monthly.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Monthly Lab Logistics Couriers Shipping Services Supplies Veterinary Support Services Frequently Asked Questions Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Referrals Any tests requested that are not performed by this laboratory will automatically be sent to a referral laboratory for testing and the progress of test results will be monitored for you The send out destination will vary according to factors such as availability reliability cost and turn around time for results For samples being referred to labs outside of the local Ithaca NY area a handling fee of 30 00 is applied for each accession sent to each referral destination This means that the total referral fee for a given case may vary For example if samples within an accession are sent to two different referral labs that accession will incur a 60 00 referral fee 30 00 x 2

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/billing/referral.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Test Results Results are available only to the veterinarian clinic or other authorized submittor of the samples Please do not ask animal owners who submit samples through veterinarians to call the Laboratory It is possible under special circumstances that results may be provided to an owner but only with the prior written authorization of the submitting veterinarian On submissions where several tests are requested on a single accession results will be reported upon completion of test preformed within a testing section rather than waiting to send the compiled results of all tests in one final report When results of the last test to be completed are available a final report of all results for that accession will be provided In certain cases such as export testing and special monitored testing situations the test results for a given accession may be held until the entire case is final and all results can be reported together Any results that could have a negative effect

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/billing/results.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Train the Trainer Laboratory Diagnostics for LVT Program Faculty To effectively diagnose animal diseases diagnosticians need good quality samples and good test results This responsibility most often falls to veterinary technicians Train the Trainer Laboratory Diagnostics for LVT faculty has been especially designed to help faculty members who prepare future generations for a career as veterinary technicians Presented by the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine s Animal Health Diagnostic Center the day long program taught veterinary technicians effective techniques and protocols for diagnostic sampling Seminar Highlights Sample protocol discussions and demonstrations Tips and tricks for collecting appropriate samples from clinical cases Shipping procedures that ensure compliance with regulations and public safety Seminar Sponsors Animal Health Diagnostic Center New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets Partners in Animal Health Speakers Elizabeth Bunting VMD Veterinary Support Services Animal Health Diagnostic Center College of Veterinary Medicine Cornell University Gerald Duhamel DVM PhD DACVP Professor of Anatomic Pathology Biomedical Sciences Animal Health Diagnostic Center College of Veterinary Medicine Cornell University Linda Mittel DVM MSPH Veterinary Support Services Animal Health Diagnostic Center College of Veterinary Medicine Cornell UniversityBelinda Thompson DVM Veterinary Support Services Animal Health Diagnostic Center College of Veterinary Medicine Cornell University Lori Tyler Ochsner LVT BS CPDT KA New York State Association of Veterinary Technicians President Chemung County Humane Society and SPCA Board member Paul Virkler DVM Veterinary Support Services Animal Health Diagnostic Center College of

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/TrainTheTrainer.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Farm Calls Through The Ages
    Animal Hospital Distemper Virus Affects Wild Carnivores of All Stripes Archives Winter 2014 Summer 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Farm Calls Through The Ages by Rachel Hasch From the establishment of Cornell s College of Veterinary Medicine to the development of the new Dairy Center of Excellence Cornell has always been regarded as a leader in dairy production medicine diagnostics and disease prevention Beginning with the work of Dr James Law in the late 1800s Cornell faculty staff and students have made farm calls a part of everyday life Dr James Law America s first university veterinary professor began his teachings at Cornell University the only way possible in 1868 by taking students on farm calls in a three seated wagon handled by a pair of horses Through the Ambulatory and Production Medicine Clinic the country s first ambulatory service Dr Law and his students were able to provide routine and emergency veterinary service on farms within 30 miles of Ithaca New York The service included care of individual cattle horses small ruminants camelids and swine as well as implementation of production medicine programs in local herds In 1876 Dr Law published the first of 15 editions of The Farmer s Veterinary Advisor to serve farmers beyond the reach of the accomplished veterinarian Furthering its outreach in the farm animal industry Cornell s College of Veterinary Medicine housed the Quality Milk Production Services division established in 1946 by then Governor Thomas Dewey Quality Milk Production Services was built upon what was formerly known as the New York State Mastitis Control Program a mastitis research program initiated by Drs D H Udall 1901 and Seth D Johnson in the 1930s Over the next 30 years it was operated out of the College eventually

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/index.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Milk Monitoring Program Saves Herd
    show As usual the farmer carried his own portable milking equipment but when it malfunctioned he had no choice but to use the machines provided When he returned to his farm he put his cows back into the herd This farmer was a member of the Bulk Tank Monitoring Program which provides bi monthly milk quality screenings So in October a sample from his bulk tank was collected and delivered to the AHDC s QMPS laboratory in Cobleskill The technician began checking for Mycoplasma species Streptococcus agalactiae Staphylococcus aureus Klebsiella and five other typical pathogens that cause mastitis a potentially fatal infection of the mammary gland Mastitis is one of the most common diseases of dairy cattle in New York and the U S and the most costly Annual losses from reduced production decreased milk premiums unusable milk and treatment are estimated at 2 3 billion In this case the bulk sample tested positive for Mycoplasma known informally as Myco According to Zurakowski who directs BTMP Myco is a normal organism of the respiratory tract but can lodge in the udder and cause infection In the past five to seven years incidents of Myco infections have increased due to movement of animals between farms cows stressed from crowding and the organism spreading through milking machines There s no treatment for Myco It is a unicellular organism without a cell wall resistant to common antibiotics That s why BTMP tries to detect pathogens early and stop their spread ensuring not only milk quality but animal health Zurakowski described BTMP as a positive program and really hands off Results keep coming in and we tell farmers this is what s going on But if results are bad all the bells and whistles go off and we re chasing after them with phone

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/impact.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • New Dairy Center of Excellence
    Toxicology Virology Programs CEM Quarantine NYSCHAP Referrals Veterinary Support Services Resources AHDC Research About AHDC About AHDC People Giving Where you get what you need not just what you ask for Farm Calls Through the Ages Milk Monitoring Saves Herd New Dairy Center of Excellence In other news Meet the team Clin Path s case of the month VSS Case Study New Name of Farm Animal Hospital Distemper Virus Affects Wild Carnivores of All Stripes Archives Winter 2014 Summer 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Cornell University s New Dairy Center of Excellence The Cornell Dairy Center of Excellence has been created to connect the over 100 faculty and staff at Cornell with expertise in the dairy industry These dairy experts engage in research extension outreach and teaching and come from many departments across the Cornell campus spanning several colleges Focus areas include preventative medicine and herd health dairy production management food safety epidemiology worker training industry relations and many others The goals of the Center include facilitating collaboration and funding opportunities enhancing the visibility of dairy expertise at Cornell and improving teaching and the dairy education experience for both students and stakeholders

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/secondary.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Meet the Team
    Center focuses on how local and national farms can improve these parlor dynamics to both be more efficient and prevent the spread of diseases such as mastitis My special interests lie in the equipment and the interaction between cows and people said Virkler One of the areas that QMPS is exploring is how to help farms quantify and manage that interaction Virkler graduated from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell in 1995 and then received his DVM from Cornell in 1998 After graduation Virkler went into private practice for a number of years before joining DeLaval as a technical service veterinarian focusing on how to improve the interaction in the milking parlor In 2008 Virkler returned to Cornell to work in the Veterinary Support Services unit at the Animal Health Diagnostic Center and has been transitioning to QMPS over the last year That s why I really had an interest coming over to the QMPS side said Virkler QMPS is focused on that dairy cow and milking equipment interaction Virkler travels to farms to obtain a complete picture of the milking equipment the cows and the people on any given day He later follows up with more visits to create a baseline using different cows milkers and seasons all of which can impact milk quality He also examines the cows after the milking machine comes off to determine if it was a positive or negative experience for the cow as stress on the teat can impact milk quality Finally he helps the famers to interpret this data Many farms have a lot of automation said Virkler Every cow and every milking has flow parameters That data can be used to see how effective the milkers were recognize any challenges in the milking process and then decide if

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/meet.cfm (2015-06-03)
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