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  • Case Study: Unexpected Findings in Unrelated Mortalities
    mottled liver that seemed more firm than normal image 2 Tissues fixed in 10 neutral buffered formalin and fresh tissues collected during the post mortem exam were submitted for histopathology bacteriology and virology testing The AHDC Veterinary Support Services veterinarian developed a specific testing plan that included histopathology on fixed tissues aerobic culture on a cerebrospinal fluid liver spleen lung and intestinal tissues and anaerobic culture on an intestinal swab submitted in anaerobic transport media cerebrospinal fluid in anaerobic transport media and liver and tissues The diagnostic plan also included submission for Salmonella culture on a fresh spleen and intestine and fluorescent antibody tests for Clostridial organisms performed on heart tissue The second case was a female white tailed deer from a private hunting preserve that died of suspected pneumonia The owners had recognized some weight loss but no other clinical signs ante mortem Two weeks previously another deer had presented with signs thought to indicate pneumonia and died A post mortem examination and limited diagnostic submissions revealed pulmonary edema due to an unknown cause with Bibersteinia trehalosi isolated from the lungs and Escherichia coli isolated from the kidneys despite a lack of marked inflammatory cell infiltrates in those tissues The veterinarian called to request advice on how to stop the deaths in these deer and was encouraged to perform a post mortem exam on the second deer since the findings in the previous case were not fully explained and there was at least one more deer in poor condition Gross necropsy findings included severe coalescing cranio ventral pneumonia with fibrous adhesions to the ribcage images 3 and 4 one heart valve with irregular thickening and very dark blood image 5 Fresh tissue samples and tissues fixed in 10 neutral buffered formalin were submitted The VSS veterinarian designed a specific plan that included histopathology testing for fixed tissues aerobic culture on thoracic fluid lung and liver samples Leptospira fluorescent antibody test on kidney fungal and Mycoplasma cultures on a lung and heart valve tissues a mineral panel and selenium testing on liver and virus isolation on lung Glass slides of exudate from thoracic cavity were made for gram stain and acid fast staining Histologic examination for the Red Angus calf samples revealed multifocal random necrosis in the liver spleen lymph node and small intestine consistent with hematogenous dissemination of bacteria Bacterial culture results indicated many Listeria monocytogenes in the cerebrospinal fluid liver spleen and lung which confirmed the diagnosis of bacteremia due to systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes Histologic findings for the white tailed deer included coalescing areas of necrosis effacing airways consistent with Mycoplasma bovis infections Results of aerobic culture revealed many Listeria monocytogenes organisms in animal s thorax and few in the lung heart valve and liver Trueperella pyogenes Biberasteinia trehalosi and Mycoplasma spp were also isolated from both lung and heart valve tissue and Trueperella pyogenes was also isolated from the liver and thoracic fluid In addition myocardial necrosis and mineralization with fibrinous endocarditis and myocarditis was

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/casestudy.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • New Name of Farm Animal Hospital
    Archives Winter 2014 Summer 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Cornell CVM Receives Gift from George Goldner and Nancy Krieg Announces Naming of Nemo Farm Animal Hospital ITHACA NY The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine CVM announced that it has received a gift from George Goldner and Nancy Krieg animal lovers of creatures great and small from Bedford Hills NY The college will name its farm animal hospital the Nemo Farm Animal Hospital for the couple s beloved pig Nemo made headlines in 2013 as the first of his species to undergo a multidrug chemotherapy protocol for lymphoma an aggressive form of blood cancer CVM oncologists treated Nemo with the chemotherapy protocol used for treating lymphoma in dogs cats and humans modifying the delivery method for a 730 pound pig The treatment put Nemo s disease into remission for more than a year and markedly advanced comparative cancer therapy knowledge We are deeply grateful to George and Nancy for their generous gift in memory of Nemo said Michael Kotlikoff Austin O Hooey Dean of Veterinary Medicine It will help us to remain at the forefront of cancer research to purchase the necessary

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/nemo.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Equine Respiratory PCR Panel
    s case of the month AHDC BioSafety Level 3 Facility Aids in Hallmark MERS Study Archives Summer 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Equine Respiratory PCR Panel now available at the AHDC The Cornell AHDC offers a real time polymerase chain reaction PCR Equine Respiratory Panel to aid veterinarians in rapidly identifying the presence of common disease agents in horses with acute respiratory illness The ability to quickly and accurately test for these comprehensive groups of pathogens from a single set of samples is a valuable tool for acute respiratory disease diagnosis and management The panel also aids in understanding the clinical manifestations of several common virus infections for which disease association is not yet well understood The pathogens detected in the Equine Respiratory Panel include equine adenovirus 1 and 2 equine arteritis virus equine rhinitis virus A and B equine herpesvirus EHV types 1 and 4 equine influenza virus all A subtypes and Streptococcus equi The AHDC also offers rapid genotyping for the EHV 1 ORF30 polymorphism associated with neurologic disease as an add on to either the Equine Respiratory Panel or the EHV 1 PCR Please specify on the submission form or contact the lab if you would like this test EHVN to be run if samples are EHV 1 positive Collection of swab samples early generally within 3 days of clinical onset will provide a better chance to identify the presence of respiratory pathogens The turnaround time is 3 5 days but STAT testing is available for an additional cost and results can be reported in as little as 3 5 hours A deep nasal swab is the preferred sampling method Cotton plastic wood handled Dacron and other synthetic swabs are all acceptable Tracheal washes can also be tested and

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014Winter/index.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Locating Lyme Disease
    joints and organs of their hosts The bacteria that cause Lyme disease are particularly difficult to detect explained Dr Bettina Wagner associate professor in the Department Of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences and director of serology at the Animal Health Diagnostic Center AHDC at Cornell After infection they tend to hide where they can t be detected They bury in the joints of dogs causing arthritis or lameness or in severe cases kidney disease the so called Lyme nephritis In humans and horses they can also enter the central nervous system causing pain paralysis or behavioral alterations By the time such clinical signs appear the bacteria are not in circulation anymore and cannot be detected by tests that target the pathogen directly Fortunately for hosts infection with the bacteria causes the immune system to produce antibodies protective proteins in the blood specially tailored to identify bind and fight specific pathogens such as harmful bacteria Diagnosticians can test blood samples to see whether an animal made antibodies in response to B burgdorferi bacteria If the antibodies are detectable the animal is likely infected The Lyme Multiplex assay has been offered through the AHDC at Cornell since 2011 said Wagner The new test exceeds its predecessor in accuracy specificity and analytical sensitivity It is fully quantitative which is important to make treatment decisions and to follow up on treatment success The Lyme Multiplex assay for horses and dogs was developed by Wagner and her colleagues at Cornell It detects antibodies to three different antigens of B burgdorferi simultaneously in one test Multiplex technology has been around for the last decade but the Animal Health Diagnostic Center AHDC is the first veterinary diagnostic laboratory that used it for Lyme disease testing Different kinds of antibodies can be found in the body at different

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014Summer/index.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Dolphin Health
    in guarded or worse condition including 17 percent that were not expected to survive Compared to dolphins tested in Florida s Sarasota Bay a control site where no oil was observed Barataria Bay dolphins were five times more likely to have moderate to severe lung diseases and suffered uncommon hormonal abnormalities Researchers at Cornell conducting the hormone tests were unaware of the origin of the dolphins included in the study We observed uncommon disease conditions in Barataria Bay dolphins consistent with petroleum hydrocarbon exposure said co author Ned Place associate professor at Cornell s College of Veterinary Medicine and director of the endocrinology laboratory in the Animal Health Diagnostic Center The Barataria Bay population is loyal to the area and dolphins could have been exposed to oil by direct contact at the surface or through ingestion while feeding Barataria Bay dolphins tested in 2011 had severely low adrenal hormones including cortisol which maintains homeostasis and spikes during stress and aldosterone which maintains water and salt balance needed for muscle and nerve function Cornell s Diagnostic Endocrinology Laboratory conducted hormonal analyses on samples collected by a group of scientists and veterinarians led by Lori Schwacke a NOAA scientist and the paper s first author Schwacke had previously evaluated hormone concentrations in different dolphin populations prior to the Deepwater Horizon spill and these studies established the minimum level of cortisol in unaffected dolphins as measured by the Cornell Diagnostic Endocrinology Laboratory Forty four percent of dolphins from Barataria Bay sampled in 2011 after the spill had a cortisol concentration that was below the established minimum level whereas all samples from Sarasota Bay dolphins had values above the minimum These results strengthen the argument that the relationship is potentially causative rather than just correlative said Place Their low cortisol levels were especially pronounced

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014spring/index.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Micro Revolution
    News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Micro revolution a radical new way to diagnose disease Speed matters when lives are on the line and helping them requires knowing what s wrong That s why Cornell s Animal Health Diagnostic Center AHDC is in the business of getting answers quickly getting them right and pioneering ways to do both better The AHDC s Bacteriology Section has radically transformed the way and speed with which it identifies bacteria becoming one of the first labs in the country to use a machine invented for other purposes to diagnose disease Because there are hundreds of proteins in each bacterium thousands of bacteria on each testing plate and often many different kinds of bacteria in a sample the protein map obtained from bacteriology samples is so complex that using it to diagnose was very difficult Thanks to Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight mass spectrometer MALDI TOF for short the process is much more doable Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique By mapping out the block by block structure of a sample a mass spectrometer can identify unknown molecules This new process identifies bacteria by recognizing patterns in the complex maps mass spectrometry makes of microorganisms using a robust database of common patterns that can be used like fingerprints for specific species Now when a MALDI TOF analyzes a bacterial sample a computer can match the resulting map to that of a known species with accuracy equal to that of microbiology s old system In traditional clinical microbiology researchers streak a sample onto an agar plate and try to identify microorganisms with several different biochemical tests Best case scenario this takes 24 hours but it takes longer if the sample is small or contains colonies of more than one kind

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2013fall/index.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Search - Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    AHDC Web Pages Customer Services General Submission Form Billing Couriers Shipping Services Education Training Veterinary Support Services Contact AHDC Search Animal Health Diagnostic Center Web Pages Prospective Students Current Students Alumni Veterinarians Reporters College Community 2014 Cornell University College of

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/search/ (2015-06-03)
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  • Information Sample Guidelines Forms Submission Information Shipping Supplies Vet Support Services Results Standard Results NYSCHAP Results Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Disease Bacteriology Mycology Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk QMPS Serology Immunology Toxicology Virology Programs CEM Quarantine NYSCHAP Referrals Veterinary Support Services Resources AHDC Research About AHDC About AHDC People Giving We are sorry the page you requested cannot be found Prospective Students Current Students

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/error.aspx?aspxerrorpath=/window.location.href.replace%28%20/ (2015-06-03)
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