archive-edu.com » EDU » C » CORNELL.EDU

Total: 425

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • New Diagnostic Cytology Service
    Resources AHDC Research About AHDC About AHDC People Giving Clinical Pathology Clinical Pathology Testing Test Info Protocols Research Development Educational Resources ClinPath Residency About the Clinical Pathology Section Personnel Contact Clinical Pathology Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious New Diagnostic Cytology Service Has Arrived The Clinical Pathology Laboratory at Cornell University has re established a high quality diagnostic cytology service to all clients of the AHDC With the addition of this service the AHDC will be able to offer a full range of diagnostic testing with minimal need to refer samples to other laboratories When you choose the AHDC cytology service you will receive Consistency and quality Provided by 4 board certified academic veterinary clinical pathologists Fast turn around times Reporting within 1 business day of sample receipt for most tests Consultation on test result interpretation Access to results via

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/ClinPath/newcyto.cfm (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Laboratory Medical Technologists in Clinical Pathology Behind every value reported from our laboratory is a team of dedicated medical technologists MT MTs are highly trained and skilled personnel that perform complex chemical biological hematological immunologic and microscopic analysis MTs possess a bachelor s degree usually in medical technology biology or chemistry from an accredited medical technology or clinical laboratory science program Certification as a MT hinges on passing a national and sometimes a separate state examination The two agencies for certification of Medical Technologists are the American Medical Technologists AMT and the American Society for Clinical Pathology ASCP To work in a New York State licensed laboratory Medical Technologists need to obtain a Registration Certificate for licensure from the University of the State of New York Education Department which needs to be renewed every 2 years The MTs in our clinical pathology laboratory are the first line in assuring quality results Currently seven MTs are employed by the laboratory several of which have worked at the laboratory for over 20 years Our MTs often have an area of expertise and may perform dedicated tasks such as flow cytometry cytochemistry or serum protein electrophoresis however many of our MTs are cross trained in all disciplines Four MTs are dedicated to hematology and perform routine complete blood counts with manual differentials When abnormal or suspicious cells or results are seen on the CBC the MTs send the results and smear to one of our clinical pathologists for review Two MTs are dedicated to performing routine chemistry testing and one MT is dedicated to Immunology testing Clients that call the laboratory regarding technical issues often have their questions answered by one of the MTs as they are

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/CPMedTech.cfm (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    IgM and specific subclasses of IgG can migrate in the late β region The shape of the electrophoretogram tracing and the quantity of protein in β and γ fractions provides information about the underlying disease In healthy animals there is a mixture of immunoglobulins which produces a small broad curve in the γ region Figure 1 Polyclonal versus monoclonal gammopathies Polyclonal gammopathy Inflammation infection or antigenic stimulation of any cause e g chronic liver or dermatologic disease can induce the secretion of mixed immunoglobulins resulting in a large broad based γ region curve Figure 2 This is called a polyclonal gammopathy This pattern is frequently accompanied by a tall narrow peak in the α 2 globulins due to increases in acute phase proteins In these cases measurement of the specific immunoglobulin classes with RID is not indicated Monoclonal gammopathy Secretion of a single class and subclass of immunoglobulins by lymphoid neoplasms will produce a tall narrow peak in the β to γ region Figure 3 This is called a monoclonal gammopathy A monoclonal gammopathy is usually due to the following Immunoglobulin secreting B cell neoplasms e g chronic lymphocytic leukemia or lymphoma Plasma cell tumors e g extramedullary plasmacytomas and multiple myeloma In these cases measurement of the involved class of immunoglobulin is indicated since it does provide additional information B cell tumors usually produce IgM or IgG monoclonal gammopathies whereas IgG or IgA monoclonal proteins are typically secreted by plasma cell tumors Furthermore the uninvolved immunoglobulins are usually decreased secondary immunodeficiency in patients with these neoplasma Figure 1 Electrophoretogram from a healthy dog Figure 2 Electrophoretogram from a cat with a polyclonal gammopathy due to gingivitis A broad based peak is present in the γ region arrow Figure 3 Electrophoretogram from a cat with an IgG monoclonal gammopathy due

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/ELP_Igs.cfm (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Coagulation Sampling Overview
    for coagulation screening tests protein C or factor assays back to top VACUTAINER DRAW Large Dogs 1 Draw blood with a vacutainer needle or butterfly catheter directly into a 3 2 or 3 8 citrate tube blue top tube Make sure the tube is in date and completely filled by vacuum draw back to top SYRINGE DRAW Small Dogs Cats 1 Draw an exact volume of citrate into a syringe to obtain 1 of the following total samples 0 2 ml citrate 1 8 ml blood 2 0 ml total 0 3 ml citrate 2 7 ml blood 3 0 ml total 0 4 ml citrate 3 6 ml blood 4 0 ml total 2 Perform venipuncture to collect total sample volume 3 Transfer citrated blood sample to a plastic or no additive glass tube for centrifugation back to top PLASMA SEPARATION 1 Centrifuge the whole blood sample for 10 to 15 minutes 2 Aspirate plasma and transfer to a plastic or no additive glass shipping tube If clot fragments or hemolysis unless in vivo hemolysis redraw 3 Refrigerate plasma for same day shipment or store frozen for up to 2 weeks back to top SHIPPING 1 Ship for overnight

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/Coag/samplingoverview.cfm (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heparin Monitoring: Heparin (anti-Xa) Assay FAQs
    UFH What is the target range for low molecular weight heparin LMWH Are anti Xa assays the same as Factor X activity assays Where can I learn more about heparin therapy What sample type is required for heparin assays Separated citrate plasma plasma from a blue top tube is the only valid sample DO NOT SUBMIT SERUM OR HEPARIN PLASMA Ship at least 0 5 mL of plasma in an insulated box with cold packs for overnight delivery See http ahdc vet cornell edu Sects Coag samplingoverview cfm for detailed sampling instructions What is the turnaround time and cost for heparin assays Heparin assays are performed daily and results reported same day as sample receipt Refer to the AHDC test fee list for current pricing When should I draw samples for heparin monitoring Peak heparin dogs Sample 3 hours after SQ dosing Peak heparin cats Sample 2 hours after SQ dosing Peak heparin horses Sample 3 to 4 hours after SQ dosing Trough heparin all species Sample for trough heparin levels just before the next scheduled dose Steady state values Sample after 24 to 48 hours of starting heparin What test should I request to monitor unfractionated heparin UFH Use test code HEP for unfractionated heparin What test should I request to monitor low molecular weight heparins such as dalteparin and enoxaparin Use test code LMWHEP for low molecular weight heparins such as dalteparin Fragmin and enoxaparin Lovenox How can I use heparin anti Xa assays to guide anticoagulant therapy Heparin anti Xa assays measure the patient s circulating levels of heparin based on specific inhibition of Factor X High anti Xa activity indicates high heparin anticoagulant effect Target anti Xa ranges developed for people can offer guidelines for animals What is the target anti Xa range for unfractionated heparin

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/Coag/test/heparin.cfm (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Services General Submission Form Billing Couriers Shipping Services Education Training Veterinary Support Services Contact AHDC CVM Home AHDC My Account Test Search for AHDC Clients Species Key Word Test Type Lab Section All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelid Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Services Referral Serology Toxicology Vet Support Services Virology Each accession received will be charged a 5 00 accessioning fee in addition to the requested testing Fees are subject to change without notice please call the lab if you have any questions Results based on search parameters Show All Test Name Lab Section Fee Antiplasmin Comparative Coagulation 36 00 Antithrombin AT3 Comparative Coagulation 35 00 aPTT Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time Comparative Coagulation 14 00 aPTT Inhibitor Screen Comparative Coagulation 14 00 Bethesda Unit Assay Comparative Coagulation 50 00 Canine Blood Typing DEA 1 1 Comparative Coagulation 30 00 Canine Blood Typing DEA 1 1 and 1 2 Comparative Coagulation 41 75 Canine TEG Bleeding Comparative Coagulation 52 50 Coagulation Panel Fibrinogen Comparative Coagulation 33

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/test/list.aspx?Species=&Test_Name=&TstTyp=&WebDisc=COAG (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Testing FAQs
    All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Coagulation Laboratory Frequently Asked Questions Customer Service FAQs Do I need an AHDC account to submit samples for coagulation testing Who do I contact for billing questions How do I receive results Coagulation Assay FAQs What sample is required for coagulation testing What sample is required for canine or feline blood typing What is the turnaround time for coagulation testing Is fasting required for Protein C assays Do I need an AHDC account to submit samples for coagulation testing A new account will be generated upon first receipt of samples from veterinary clinics referral and research laboratories Owners should work with their veterinarian for coagulation sampling and submissions Who do I contact for billing questions Check billing and fee policies http ahdc vet cornell edu billing For specific questions call the Billing department at 607 253 3951 How do I receive results Reports are emailed as PDFs or faxed to your account as soon as results are finalized You can also check on line to confirm sample receipt and view results Use the account access link http ahdc vet cornell edu myaccount ahdc portal aspx to manage your preferences for receiving results back to top What sample is required for coagulation testing Separated citrate plasma plasma from a blue top tube is required for all coagulation screening tests factor assays Von Willebrand assays protein C and antithrombin assays and heparin monitoring Refer to http ahdc vet cornell edu Sects Coag samplingoverview cfm for detailed sampling instructions What sample is required for

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/coag/test/testingfaqs.cfm (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Comparative Coagulation: Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Fees Sampling Instructions Shipping Information Submission Form Testing FAQ s Contact Coagulation Lab Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/Coag/staff/contact.cfm (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive



  •