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  • Small Farm Introduction
    Modules 4 H Livestock Educator s Notebook Beef Quality Bovine Leukosis BVD Calf Health Cattle Care Guidelines Core Environmental Pathogens Food Safety and Drug Residue Avoidance Foot Health Herd Expansion Johne s Disease Mastitis Milk Quality Salmonella Veterinary Certification Newsletters Fact Sheets Feedback Links Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Welcome to the Doe Farm General Information about the farm Family Farm John and Linda Son James wife Cheryl and 3 children Son Frank Tie stall facility purebred herd of 75 milking cows milked 2x day 19 500 RHA Farm in existence since 1918 facilities built in early 1950s addition built in early 1970s The farm family prides their show string of cattle and show as often as possible Farm Goals Market purebred stock bulls heifers and cows domestically as well as internationally Small expansion in the future Maintain competitive

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/smallfarm.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Large Farm Introduction
    good preventive medicine Herd Health NYSCHAP NYSCHAP Testing About NYSCHAP Contacts Modules 4 H Livestock Educator s Notebook Beef Quality Bovine Leukosis BVD Calf Health Cattle Care Guidelines Core Environmental Pathogens Food Safety and Drug Residue Avoidance Foot Health Herd Expansion Johne s Disease Mastitis Milk Quality Salmonella Veterinary Certification Newsletters Fact Sheets Feedback Links Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Welcome to the Loe Farm General Information about the farm Free stall facility mixed herd of 300 milking cows milked 2x day RHA 17 500 Family Farm Craig and Joan Son Manny wife Ann and 2 children Son Jerry wife Susan and 5 children Daughter Franny 1990 increased herd by 100 cows purchased from various sources Farm Goals Increase profit Expand to 500 cows within 5 years Capture premium for low SCC milk below 350 000 0 10 below

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/largefarm.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Certification Information
    Feedback Links Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Procedure for Completing Certification for NYSCHAP I Contact the regional state veterinarian and the NYSCHAP Coordinator II Review the following materials for the NSYCHAP Core Module and submit the test to the NYSCHAP Coordinator a Biosecurity and Best Management Practices b NYSCHAP Best Management Practices c Procedures for Submitting NYSCHAP Forms d NYSCHAP Application e NYSCHAP Baseline Survey f DL Herd Test Strategy Form g NYSCHAP Herd Plan Cover Page h NYSCHAP Herd Plan i NYSCHAP Annual Evaluation Form j Core Module Risk Assessment k NYSCHAP Area Risk Assessment l NYSCHAP Core Module Case Studies m NYSCHAP Overview Power Point Presentation III Review the following materials for the NYSCHAP Johne s Disease Module and complete and submit the test to the NYSCHAP Coordinator a Clinical Description and Epidemiology of Johne s Disease in Cattle b Critical Management Points for Prevention and Control of Johne s Disease in Dairy Cattle c Critical Management Points for Prevention and Control of Johne s Disease in Beef Cattle d Concepts for Interpretation of Johne s Disease Diagnostic Tests e Johne s Disease Diagnostic Tests the ELISA f Johne s Disease Diagnostic Tests Fecal Culture g Testing Choosing the Right Test for the Right Purpose h Principles of Johne s Prevention and Control i How to Enroll a Farm in the Johne s Disease Module j Critical Management Point for Johne s Disease in Dairy Herds k

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/certinfo.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Veterinary Certification Training
    Program Farm specific herd health plans are good preventive medicine Herd Health NYSCHAP NYSCHAP Testing About NYSCHAP Contacts Modules 4 H Livestock Educator s Notebook Beef Quality Bovine Leukosis BVD Calf Health Cattle Care Guidelines Core Environmental Pathogens Food Safety and Drug Residue Avoidance Foot Health Herd Expansion Johne s Disease Mastitis Milk Quality Salmonella Veterinary Certification Newsletters Fact Sheets Feedback Links Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/training.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Hemophilia A
    linked or X linked recessive All males have one gene for Factor VIII which they inherit from their dam All females have two genes for Factor VIII one inherited from dam and one from sire Expression and Transmission Males having one normal gene and females having two normal genes for Factor VIII are clear of the hemophilia A trait and will not transmit this defect to offspring Males having one abnormal gene are affected with hemophilia and will transmit that abnormal gene to all their daughters but to none of their sons Females having one normal and one abnormal gene are asymptomatic carriers and will transmit the abnormal gene on average to one half of their sons and one half of their daughters If an X chromosome carrying a normal gene for Factor VIII is represented as XH and an X carrying the abnormal or hemophilic gene is represented as Xh then the different possibilities for clinical status phenotype and genetic makeup genotype can be represented as follows Phenotype Genotype Normal male XHY Normal female XHXH Affected male XhY Carrier female XhXH Affected female XhXh Hemophilia is most commonly propagated within a line when asymptomatic carrier females are bred to normal males The male puppies produced from this mating with each have a 50 50 chance of being affected with hemophilia and the females will each have a 50 50 chance of being a carrier On average the following 4 categories of offspring types will occur in equal numbers Parental type Offspring types Genotype Carrier female and normal male normal male XHY XhXH and XHY affected male XhY normal female XHXH carrier female XhXH Clinical Signs Hemophiliacs may bleed spontaneously into joints or muscles resulting in lameness and swelling Severe often fatal hemorrhage can occur into the chest or abdominal cavity Bleeding under the skin results in soft swellings called hematoma If a hemophiliac undergoes trauma or surgery then excessive hemorrhage occurs at the injured site Different mutations responsible for hemophilia cause variable severity of bleeding tendency Some forms of hemophilia are so severe that most affected dogs will die within the first few weeks of life Other forms may be less severe where affected dogs will survive but exhibit intermittent signs of bleeding Laboratory diagnosis Coagulation assays performed on a specially prepared blood sample are needed to diagnose hemophilia in dogs The APTT activated partial thromboplastin time is a screening test for coagulation defects and this test is abnormal in hemophiliacs A specific diagnosis of hemophilia A must be based on specific measurement of canine coagulation Factor VIII hemophilic dogs have a marked reduction in Factor VIII activity compared to normal dogs In properly prepared samples using tests validated for dogs the laboratory diagnosis of hemophilia affected dogs is highly accurate Unfortunately coagulation assays may not always distinguish between carrier and clear females In general carrier females have low levels of Factor VIII but there is some overlap between carrier and clear females at the low end of Factor

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/coag/clinical/Hemopha.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • DIC and Thrombosis
    a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious DIC and Thrombosis Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation DIC and Thrombotic Disorders Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a devastating clinical syndrome triggered by systemic activation of the coagulation cascade DIC is always an acquired syndrome occuring because of a primary disease Many common diseases are capable of initiating DIC including neoplasia shock sepsis pancreatitis and hemolytic anemia The disease process is dynamic with early thrombosis progressing to diffuse bleeding The clinical signs of DIC are highly variable and depend on the underlying disease and the balance between thrombosis and hemorrhage Thrombosis and thromboembolism develop in association with many conditions causing blood stasis vascular endothelial injury or hypercoagulability of blood Pulmonary thromboembolism is common in dogs and has been reported in association with hyperadrenocorticism nephrotic syndrome neoplasia and immune mediated hemolysis The early diagnosis of DIC or thromboembolism is difficult yet intervention early in the disease process is most likely to benefit the patient Careful physical examination and laboratory testing are the most effective means for their identification Identification of DIC and Thrombotic Disorders To identify DIC and thrombosis use the following tests DIC panel aPTT PT fibrinogen antithrombin and quantitative D dimer Fulminant or hemorrhagic DIC is characterized by prolongation of aPTT PT low fibrinogen and high D dimer In chronic or thrombotic DIC coagulation screening tests may be within normal limits but D dimer concentration is high Antithrombin is a natural anticoagulant and is often depleted during thrombus formation in active

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/coag/clinical/dicthro.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Vitamin K Therapy
    Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Vitamin K Therapy Vitamin K therapy improves hemostasis in Vitamin K deficient patients It is often initiated pending test results but maintenance of vitamin K is not indicated for patients having diagnoses of thrombocytopenia hereditary factor deficiencies or DIC Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicities are the most common cause of severe vitamin K deficiency in dogs and cats Vitamin K reverses the anticoagulant effect of rodenticides over a period of 24 to 48 hours from initiation of therapy Other vitamin K deficient states include biliary obstruction intrahepatic cholestasis intestinal malabsorption and chronic oral antibiotic administration Warfarin is a relatively short acting rodenticide and treatment for a total of 1 week usually is adequate Administer an initial dose of Vitamin K1 Aquamephyton Merck Sharp Dohme 2 2 mg kg SC Follow with a dose of 1 1 mg kg SC q 12h until active bleeding subsides Then substitute an oral vitamin K1 preparation Mephyton at the same twice daily dosage To treat toxicity from second generation or long acting rodenticides bromadiolone brodifacoum or diphacinone pindone Initiate parenteral Vitamin K1 as for warfarin 2 2 mg kg SC Administer Vitamin K1 at 1 1 mg kg SC q 12h until hematocrit value stabilizes and active bleeding subsides Maintain oral Vitamin K1 at 1 1 mg kg PO q 12h for a total of 2 weeks Taper the maintenance dose by one half every 2 weeks during treatment In order to prevent relapse

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/coag/clinical/vitamk.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Transfusion Guidelines
    Types Infectious Non Infectious Clinical Topics Transfusion Guidelines Product Volume Frequency Indications Fresh whole blood 12 to 20 ml kg q 24 h anemia platelet factor replacement Packed red cells 6 to 10 ml kg q 12 to 24 h anemia Platelet rich plasma 6 to 10 ml kg q 8 to 12 h platelet dysfunction thrombocytopenia Fresh and fresh frozen plasma 6 to 12 ml kg q 8 to 12 h coagulation factor deficiencies vWD DIC hypoproteinemia Frozen plasma 6 to 12 ml kg q 8 to 12 h hypoproteinemia Plasma cryoprecipitatea 1 unit 10 kg q 4 to 12 h as needed hemophilia A factor VIII deficiency fibrinogen deficiency von Willebrand disease Cryosupernatant 6 to 12 ml kg q 8 to 12 h hemophilia B factor IX deficiency factor VII X or XI deficiency vitamin K deficiency hypoproteinemia a1 unit cryoprecipitate produced from 200 ml of fresh frozen plasma Transfusion Rate Start all transfusions at 1 to 2 ml minute Adult dogs maximum rate of 3 to 6 ml minute Cats kittens puppies maximum rate of 1 to 2 ml minute Component Processing and Storage Fresh whole blood Transfuse within 4 to 6 hour of collection Fresh plasma Centrifuged to separate plasma from whole blood transfuse within 4 to 6 hr of collection Fresh frozen plasma Collect in citrate anticoagulant separate plasma from whole blood within 4 to 6 hr of collection store frozen for up to 1 year Platelet rich plasma Collect in citrate anticoagulant separate platelet rich plasma from whole blood within 4 to 6 hr of collection process and store at room temperature transfuse within 48 hr of collection Packed Red Cells Collect in citrate anticoagulant separate from whole blood within 4 to 6 hr of collection combine packed cells with additives for sustained red

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/coag/clinical/transfu.cfm (2015-06-03)
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