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  • Key Word Test Type Lab Section All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelid Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Services Referral Serology Toxicology Vet Support Services Virology Each accession received will be charged a 5 00 accessioning fee in addition to the requested testing Fees are subject to change without notice please call the lab if you have any questions Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 EHV 1 PCR EHV1PCR Sample Details 1 EDTA blood min 2 mL 2 nasopharyngeal swab 3 tracheal wash min 10 mL 4 tissues min 2g lung liver spleen myocardium placenta fetus 5 CSF Cerebral Spinal Fluid Cost Fee 36 75 Comment Submit swabs in sterile sealed vials with several drops of saline added to prevent desiccation Bacterial transport media are not appropriate for PCR assays If culture is desired submit a separate swab in an acceptable bacterial transport media Cotton plastic wood handled and Dacron and other synthetic swabs are all acceptable for PCR based assays Calcium alginate swabs should be avoided For add l info on submitting samples for virus isolation see Transport Media for Diagnostic Sampling Stat processing is available for individual blood serum or plasma samples A 50 fee will be charged for each stat sample tested Samples arriving before 12pm will be reported out by 5pm the same day Samples arriving after 12pm will be reported by 1pm the next day In addition if EHV 1 is detected you can request Equine Herpes Virus 1 Neurological Genotyping to determine if the infecting strain has the neurotropic mutation That will also incur a separate fee This service is performed pursuant to

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/test/detail.aspx?testcode=EHV1PCR (2015-06-03)
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  • QMPS: Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    one time fee of 200 300 for non NYS farms is paid per year which entitles you to six bulk tank samples during a 12 month period If you have two bulk tanks that you want sampled each time the cost is then 300 NYS for both How do my samples get to the laboratory QMPS collects the bulk tank sample for you automatically either through your milk cooperative or milk hauler This eliminates the burden of packaging and sending a sample to our laboratory What information do I receive from my bulk tank Reports and an analysis of the results are sent to you and anyone else you designate to receive this information We will report to you the detection of Strep agalactiae Staph aureus Pseudomonas Klebsiella E coli T pyogenes Serratia Yeast and Mycoplasma along with total levels of streps staphs and coliforms If you enrolled in DHI and have a herd code that data may also be incorporated when possible There may be an additional charge for some data analysis programs What is the benefit to me The enrollment fee is less expensive than shipping six individual bulk tank samples You only need to spend a short amount of time answering a few questions at the beginning of your enrollment and your bulk tanks are automatically collected and reported back to you You then receive regular culture reports of the bulk tank with an analysis to help you better manage your milk quality and animal health Who else can receive reports You designate the recipients of your reports when you enroll in the program They can be your herd or NYSCHAP veterinarian milk inspector herdsman or anyone else that you feel would be helpful to you by having this information How do I enroll You may enroll

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/QMPS/Services/bulktank.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Q&A with Drs. Perkins and Mittel
    RNA and is therefore what we call a very sensitive test The disadvantage is that when small amounts of DNA RNA are found there is often the question as to whether the organism is alive and replicating or whether there is residual DNA RNA left over from the illness This can be a problem when an agent is dead and the animal is not infectious from the testing one cannot tell the difference This has been seen a number of times with strangles testing Vaccines that have the actual genetic material of the agent such as intranasal strangles vaccines can cause a false positive if found in the nasal passages when sampling is done Why is it better than the previous system of individual tests The clinician is often concerned about each of the test pathogens when dealing with a horse with a fever of unknown origin or a horse with a fever and respiratory signs This test has the capability of testing for a number of pathogens at once with a bundled fee In addition the test is rapid This should reduce costs to the client while increasing the number of infectious diseases that we investigate When should I order the respiratory PCR panel Order the panel for any horse with a fever and serous nasal discharge for which a respiratory illness or infectious agent is suspected as well as instances in which strangles is suspected a horse with a fever snotty nose and lymph node swelling Viruses or bacteria may present themselves in different ways in individual horses and the presenting signs may be atypical It is good to rule out any agents you can especially ones with high consequence The AHDC has had cases that did not appear to be influenza and came back positive It is also helpful to assist in determining if the animal is shedding virus particles It will also give the entire barn owner and trainer in these cases peace of mind How should I submit samples Nasal swabs should be taken by placing a polyester tipped swab into the horse s nose and contacting the nasal mucosa for three to five seconds The more nasal discharge on the swab the more likely you are to have a positive test The swab should then be placed in a sterile container red top tube and the ends of the swab broken off to facilitate closure of the tube This panel can use nasal swabs transtracheal wash fluids BAL or nasal wash samples for testing Once the sample is obtained it is placed in a plain red top tube with a drop or two of sterile saline This is not to assist with the PCR testing but we will often try to grow a virus if it is found by PCR We do this as a surveillance procedure to learn about new viruses People often ask about the length of the swab to use In most cases a regular five inch swab can be used

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014Winter/qanda.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Rapid Diagnostics Keep Competition Horses Active
    other news Monitoring multi drug resistant Salmonella Meet the team Clin Path s case of the month AHDC BioSafety Level 3 Facility Aids in Hallmark MERS Study Archives Summer 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Rapid PCR results keep competition horses active A horse with a fever lethargy and anorexia caused a severe panic in a large show barn An elite show horse he returned to his home barn after being on the road competing for a week Within two days he became severely ill The entire barn was worried about EHV 1 and other respiratory agents that could cause the barn to be quarantined which could stop training and prevent horses from qualifying for future events Diagnostics needed to be run immediately to determine proper disease management The referring veterinarian called the AHDC and spoke to one of the Veterinary Support Services VSS veterinarians about this case She needed PCR testing for EHV 1 and strangles but was worried she might be missing something She also needed the results fast Horses were waiting to leave for shows and she had put the barn under a no movement restriction until results were obtained The veterinarian was told about the new adult equine PCR respiratory panel at the AHDC which tests for EHV 1 and EHV 4 adenovirus 1 and 2 EVA influenza Rhinitis A and B and Strep equi and she decided to order the test immediately Inquiries about expedited STAT testing were made because the entire barn was at a standstill in the middle of show season Having ordered results STAT the referring veterinarian received her negative respiratory PCR tests results five hours after the arrival of samples at the laboratory A PCR for Anaplasma phagocytophilium had also been done because of

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014Winter/secondary.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Horse Health Tips
    get what you need not just what you ask for Equine Respiratory PCR Available Q A with Drs Perkins Mittel Rapid Diagnostics for Horses Horse Health Tips In other news Monitoring multi drug resistant Salmonella Meet the team Clin Path s case of the month AHDC BioSafety Level 3 Facility Aids in Hallmark MERS Study Archives Summer 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Horse Health Tips Dr Linda Mittel MSPH DVM senior extension associate at the AHDC offers tips and good practices for equine biosecurity at home boarding facilities show grounds and the track Vaccinate Common available vaccines can protect against rabies strangles influenza tetanus and more Don t submerge the ends of water hoses in water buckets The outside of hoses often harbor disease causing bacteria or viruses Keep them out of the water Clean water troughs routinely Don t share or swap buckets of water or food or hay nets Other horses that use it may harbor pathogens Don t share tack or other equipment in the barn with different horses Clean bits after use Use separate grooming tools for each horse Use specifically designed pitch forks and wheelbarrows for animals

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014Winter/tips.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Monitoring multi-drug resistant Salmonella
    associate at the AHDC We don t know how and when multi drug resistant strains emerged in the northeastern bovine industry or how widespread they are but we follow up on every case to help contain outbreaks The AHDC monitors and combats this and other diseases through diagnostics consultations with veterinarians and outreach programs Its veterinarians cooperate with New York State to provide educational materials about the control of Salmonella Dublin in herds and conduct outreach education programs across the Northeast to help veterinarians understand and control the disease They also participate in research projects to gauge the effect of recommended control measures in modern dairies and research the disease s prevalence in collaboration with the USDA A one of a kind test the AHDC is using to identify Salmonella Dublin infections has offered farmers a new tool to keep the disease at bay The test detects antibodies making it cheaper quicker safer and more sensitive than prior methods relying on culturing bacteria It also reveals dormant infections in carrier animals helping farmers and veterinarians monitor infection spread over time and track the impact of control measures This disease needs to be controlled with management practices on the farm said Dr Thompson Recent introduction of Salmonella Dublin into a population with no prior exposure might under the right conditions result in an explosive outbreak Outbreaks of clinical illness in calves in herds where the infection is apparently endemic are reported to occur when there are breakdowns in management To reduce the risk of infection the AHDC recommends maintaining clean maternity pens prompt removal of calves from dams fastidious colostrum management milk and feed utensil sanitation pasteurization of raw milk fed to calves promotion of good air quality and reduction of stress by providing clean comfortable housing and proper nutrition Warning

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014Winter/salmonella.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Meet the Team
    Available Q A with Drs Perkins Mittel Rapid Diagnostics for Horses Horse Health Tips In other news Monitoring multi drug resistant Salmonella Meet the team Clin Path s case of the month AHDC BioSafety Level 3 Facility Aids in Hallmark MERS Study Archives Summer 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Meet the Team Dr Linda Mittel Senior Extension Associate Get to know the AHDC s equine expert Linda D Mittel MSPH DVM Dr Linda D Mittel is a Senior Extension Associate at the Animal Health Diagnostic Center A typical day finds her conducting phone consultations with practicing veterinarians researching rare and unusual cases assisting in laboratory testing needs and providing critical result interpretation and disease management She enjoys learning about new and emerging equine diseases and conducts research on infectious diseases tick borne diseases and parasites in horses She earned her MSPH in Parasitology and Lab Practices at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health in 1975 and her DVM from Auburn University in 1980 She practiced equine medicine in Texas Arkansas Kentucky Florida Connecticut and New York later taking on management and ownership roles in equine practice serving New York and Connecticut She joined the AHDC in 2009 I practiced equine veterinary care for 30 years then decided to use my practical experience to assist in consulting with clients at the AHDC said Mittel My experience as a practicing veterinarian allows me to understand the needs of our clients the resources and collective knowledge available at the AHDC help me get results and information to them in an accurate and timely manner Dr Mittel lives in the Ithaca area with her three Jack Russell Terriers she knows this is crazy and enjoys visiting Cornell s plantations and

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014Winter/meet.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Q&A with Dr. Ned Place
    Dolphin hormone Q A with Dr Ned Place Dr Place is an associate professor at Cornell s College of Veterinary Medicine and director of the endocrinology laboratory in the Animal Health Diagnostic Center How did the AHDC get involved in this study Cornell s Diagnostic Endocrinology Laboratory had collaborated with NOAA on dolphin hormone tests in the past so it was a natural partnership to continue when Dr Lori Schwacke contacted us in 2011 about doing more testing We didn t know which samples were from sick or healthy dolphins if the dolphins were captured in the area that was affected by the spill Barataria Bay LA or in an unaffected area Sarasota Bay FL That information wasn t available to us until Dr Schwacke called us after we d sent the results What kind of tests did you perform Using the blood serum samples we received we did a battery of hormone tests including cortisol aldosterone and thyroid function tests What evidence links the abnormal hormonal conditions you found to oil exposure Prior studies have established connections between petroleum oil exposure and abnormalities in hormone secretion from the adrenal gland in marine mammals Other investigators focused on mink as a model for effects of oil spills on sea otters and they found evidence of adrenal insufficiency an outcome that appears to be similar to our results in the dolphins How could the oil have interfered with hormones Cortisol is produced and secreted by the adrenal gland but the process begins in a region of the brain called the hypothalamus It sends a hormonal signal to the neighboring pituitary gland which then releases another hormone into the blood which then travels to the adrenal cortex and stimulates the production of cortisol Inhaled or ingested oil could interfere with any step

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014spring/qanda.cfm (2015-06-03)
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