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  • Endocrinology Laboratory
    in flexibility From reproductive tests in cats or cattle to metabolic profiles in dogs or dolphins the lab offers broad health and research testing services that can adapt to the needs and circumstances at hand as it did when it studied the health of dolphins who were exposed to oil in the aftermath of the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill Its Clinical Testing Services help veterinarians and scientists improve the health of animals whether they are pets food and fiber producers athletes wildlife or denizens of zoos or research laboratories The wide variety of adrenal metabolic reproductive and thyroid tests available usually focus on dogs cats cattle and horses but can be easily adapted to many other species For example when Cornell became involved with helping an elephant in Syracuse s Rosamond Gifford Zoo through her pregnancy and to deliver a healthy baby the lab helped monitor the mother s pre birthing hormones We had to run tests and interpret them a little differently from the routine species said Lab Manager Steven Lamb We serve all sorts of clients from Merck to NOAA to a high school class in NYC wanting to measure hormones in milk The diversity of our activities also gives us flexibility to try and develop new tests Our Contract Research Testing service helps us expand our testing portfolio by providing the impetus to add and validate new tests For example we developed a way to use adrenocorticotropic hormones as biomarkers for diagnosing equine Cushing s disease and metabolic syndrome in horses The lab s robust Research Testing Service is utilized by diverse kinds of clients The service and the expertise behind it support research across Cornell and other universities throughout the world as well as studies by non profit foundations institutes and governments Scientists in

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014spring/secondary.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Meet the Team
    In other news Meet the team Clin Path s case of the month Case study mortality outbreak Alert equine enteric coronavirus Archives Fall 2013 Spring 2014 News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Meet the Team Dr Erin Goodrich New position is role reversal When the phone rings Dr Erin Goodrich CALS 04 DVM 08 is never quite sure what to expect It could be a dairy producer worried about a respiratory condition sweeping through his herd It could be a rabbit producer with a bacterial outbreak responsible for multiple deaths Likewise the samples that appear in the mailing room are random and fascinating This is one of the reasons I was excited to join the veterinary support specialists said Dr Goodrich who has been with the AHDC team since early December I need to be on my toes and able to switch gears quickly It s exciting and intellectually stimulating Dr Goodrich learned of the veterinary support specialists while working in a mixed animal practice as a veterinarian In this role she called upon the AHDC specialists to help her address complicated challenges while she was in the field Her first goal in her new role is to return the favor As a veterinarian I ve been working directly with producers and animal owners said Dr Goodrich who began exploring the veterinary profession while in high school In my role as a veterinary support specialist I m looking forward to working more closely with veterinarians and leveraging the resources including the collective knowledge that is available in this building to help them problem solve Dr Goodrich comes to Cornell most recently from Day Hollow Animal Hospital in Owego where she worked with small and large animals Prior to that she practiced with Midstate Veterinary Services where she worked

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014spring/meet.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Case Study: Mortality Outbreak in New York State Sheep Flock
    for possible caseous lymphadenitis CLA caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Feces from two other animals ewe C and ewe D were submitted due to the veterinarian s concern for flukes and possible Johne s disease Upon arrival this case was reviewed by one of the Veterinary Support Services Veterinarians and a specific diagnostic plan was established as follows Histopathology was requested on the fixed liver The fresh liver sections were each submitted for both aerobic and anaerobic cultures as well as parasite identification The fecal samples were each submitted for Johne s culture and fecal quantitative floatation Results from Parasitology showed Eimeria parva in the feces from Ewe C and Eimeria parva Eimeria ovinoidalis and Strongyles in the feces from Ewe D No fluke eggs were detected in either of the samples Interestingly the parasitologist identified an immature Fascioloides magna in the fresh liver from Ewe B see image at left and many cysts containing pus were noted in the liver form Ewe A but no parasites were recovered Aerobic bacterial culture of the liver samples grew few Escherichia Coli in both ewes and many Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in the liver from Ewe A Anaerobic bacterial culture grew Clostridium perfringens in both livers and a second Clostridium species that could not be further characterized in the liver from Ewe B Johne s culture on Ewes C and D is still pending The histologic results were equally informative showing characteristic findings of Black disease Black disease occurs secondarily to migrating helminth larvae in this case Fascioloides magna The migration of these parasites leads to areas of ischemic necrosis where spores of Clostridium novyi can then germinate and release exotoxins leading to further hepatocellular necrosis In this case all of the testing proved important in arriving at a complete overall diagnosis The parasite identification coupled with the histopathology findings was crucial to not only diagnose Black disease on this farm but also to identify the specific parasite in question Knowing that Fascioloides magna is the causative agent behind this outbreak appropriate control measures can be implemented based on its unique life cycle Also the culture of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis along with the histopathology results of pus filled cysts within the liver parenchyma highlight another issue in this flock Fascioloides magna is a trematode with an interesting life cycle It is widely scattered over North America Within New York State it tends to be found mainly in the Adirondack Mountain region The definitive host is the white tailed deer When eggs are deposited within deer feces into a wet environment a ciliated larva called a miracidium develops At summer temperatures after a couple of weeks the miracidium escapes from the egg and swims until it finds a snail It will die within 24 hours if it does not find a suitable host snail Once inside the snail it forms a sporocyst which in turn forms germinal balls that each develop into a redia The rediae grow until they burst out of the sporocyst and into the

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2014spring/casestudy.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Equine Enteric Coronavirus
    weeks For a more complete description of signs characteristics of this disease and appropriate sample submission for testing please take a look at the following fact sheet Equine Enteric Coronavirus Overview Coronaviruses comprise a large group of RNA viruses that can cause both respiratory and enteric signs of disease in various species They are further grouped based on genetic and serologic differences into alpha beta and gamma coronaviruses The equine coronavirus a beta coronavirus has been recently isolated from a number of outbreaks across the country This is an enteric disease of the equine At this time there has been no association with a respiratory component although in cattle enteric and respiratory disease is common Transmission Fecal oral route Survival in environment Unknown Age distribution Most often diagnosed in adults usually older than 2 years of age Seasonality Seen during the cold weather months in the Northeast areas December through May Common Clinical Signs Blood test changes Anorexia Lethargy Fever usually 104 0 Changes in fecal character diarrhea not routinely seen Mild colicy like signs laying down looking at sides Neurologic abnormalities ataxia depression recumbency secondary to hyperammonemia Leukopenia neutropenia lymphopenia Hypoalbunemia Morbidity ranges from about 20 57 Pusterla et al 2013 and mortality is typically rare but secondary complications including dehydration diminished perfusion and gastrointestinal translocation can occur Pusterla et al 2013 Hyperammonemia and associated neurological signs may be cause for mortality Duration Signs generally resolve in 1 4 days with supportive care and outbreaks typically last for about 3 weeks Pusterla et al 2013 AHDC Sample Submission Requirements The sample is fresh feces submitted in an unbreakable leak proof container to the laboratory by overnight courier on ice packs Samples must be kept chilled to prevent overgrowth of bacteria that may cause inhibition in the PCR testing Feces

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/equine_enteric_coronavirus.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Mystery-Solving MALDI
    of the month Case study in dairy cattle News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Mystery Solving MALDI Even before the Cornell University Animal Health Diagnostic Center s Bacteriology Laboratory had the verification data accepted and approved for the Bruker MALDI Biotyper this amazing technology made a significant impact for one of our clients by guiding us in the identification of a pathogenic organism we would have otherwise missed Two animals belonging to the collection of one of our zoological clients died suddenly within two days of each other When the necropsies were performed they found evidence of bacterial sepsis in both animals Samples were submitted to our laboratory for bacterial culture consisting of a lymph sac swab from an exotic toad and swabs of peritoneal fluid and brain from a lesser panda The bacterial cultures from these samples were evaluated by different technicians with a similar enteric organism being isolated from both cases Initially these organisms were unidentifiable by our conventional methods The Sensititre automated identification system gave a result of No Identification Possible Additionally screening tests set with conventional biochemicals lead to reactions that did not afford many clues to the identification We decided to run the isolates on our MALDI Biotyper as we had already completed operational training and were actively gathering verification data from the instrument The identifications were received within minutes for the isolates and were both identified as Salmonella species The identification given by the MALDI Biotyper was questioned because the biochemical reactions were so uncharacteristic for Salmonella species We still needed to pursue additional avenues to confirm the actual identification of the organism We collaborated with a research laboratory in the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine who has an established BAX System PCR Assay specifically for Salmonella species The test was positive

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2013fall/mystery.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • MALDI Q&A
    by MALDI TOF is extremely fast minutes compared to hours and will improve efficiency when used early in the identification protocol Additional conventional techniques can then be reserved for isolates not identified by MALDI TOF with high confidence In most cases culture results can potentially be reported to the client one day earlier This in turn could help stop the spread of disease not only to other animals in a herd situation but also to the people associated with them in certain situations How has having the MALDI TOF changed the way you do things or what you do during the day Does it allow you to do more To investigate other novel approaches To redefine your role as a microbiologist The AHDC employs a team of highly qualified technologists in the Bacteriology Laboratory who are not only trained to simply find the pathogen but to also investigate potentially new and emerging pathogens Each culture is unique and we never know what we will find when we open those agar plates The use of MALDI TOF mass spectrometry will certainly aid in the rapid identification of anything unusual Our role as microbiologists will remain the same due to the inherent curiosity of investigation in our field This will never be lost and I believe we will become even more important in the rapid identification and diagnoses of emerging bacterial diseases What kind of samples do you need Bacterial culturing can be performed on nearly any sample type imaginable literally from head to toe and beyond including environmental samples The AHDC maintains a high standard to provide quality results to our clients and we strongly believe in Quality in Quality out When sampling all surfaces should be assumed to contaminated with bacteria most of which could be normal commensal or environmental

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2013fall/qanda.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Meet Dr. Jagne
    Animal Health Diagnostic Center s multi species veterinary support services for the past two years Dr Jarra Jagne 90 specializes in all things poultry She touches all poultry related cases that come in the door from New York state and other states as far as Washington She handles questions clients testing and interfacing with other departments across the AHDC Most of her work takes her out into the field to visit poultry owners ranging from commercial farmers to people with a few backyard birds an emerging trend in her work sparking new sets of health issues Poultry populations have recently surged in urban and suburban areas said Jagne Right now we are seeing fewer diseases in the commercial side Where vaccination isn t practiced as in backyard poultry production we re seeing common respiratory diseases such as Newcastle disease virus infectious bronchitis virus and bacterial diseases caused by E coli People are overfeeding their chickens which is leading to fatty liver syndrome Birds can die from this very suddenly We have to provide a lot of education for backyard poultry owners Beyond these services Jagne s job involves teaching veterinary students in a course on poultry diseases Partnering with Cornell s Cooperative Extension program she works with 4H groups that help kids raise poultry for show She helps agricultural educators plan effective seminars and gives talks on poultry diseases at Cornell s annual Poultry Day event She also works closely with N Y State s Department of Agriculture and Markets teaching their staff veterinarians about poultry issues Hailing from Gambia in West Africa Jagne has had a colorful career that has found her in more than 30 countries around the world She spent time in a poultry genetics company and later moved to working internationally for the United Nations and

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2013fall/meet.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Case of the Month
    MALDI Q A with Melissa Aprea In other news Meet the team Clin Path s case of the month Case study in dairy cattle News Announcements Sign Up for eNews Contact AHDC Clin Path s Case of the Month October 2013 Bicavitary effusion in a cat Case information A 3 to 4 year old female spayed Maine Coon cat presented to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals Emergency Service for respiratory distress The owner reported that she began hiding and acting unusual 3 days prior The owner had also noted her having some increased respiratory effort Over the next two days she was hiding more her appetite had decreased and her respiratory effort had become markedly increased She had a history of a heart murmur but no other prior medical problems On presentation she was in respiratory distress and immediately placed into an oxygen cage After an intravenous catheter was placed she was given a mild sedative intravenously and a FAST ultrasound scan was performed The FAST scan revealed the presence of pleural and pericardial effusion She was given additional sedatives to facilitate a thoracocentesis and pericardiocentesis The thoracocentesis yielded 190mL of orange tinged serous fluid and the pericardiocentesis yielded 140mL of serosanguineous fluid The pleural and pericardial fluids were submitted to the Clinical Pathology laboratory for fluid analysis and cytology The fluid analyses and representative cytologic images from both sites are provided below Site of effusion Pleural Pericardial Volume mL 3 0 4 0 Color Medium orange Dark red Turbidity Slightly cloudy Opaque Total protein refractometer g dL 2 8 4 3 Nucleated cells thou uL 9 3 32 5 Red blood cells thou uL 22 3 1826 7 View the photomicrographs then answer the questions below What is the predominant cell type in the pleural fluid How would

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/news/lablinks/archive/2013fall/oct2013case.cfm (2015-06-03)
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