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  • Services Contact AHDC CVM Home AHDC My Account Test Search for AHDC Clients Species Key Word Test Type Lab Section All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelid Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Services Referral Serology Toxicology Vet

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/test/list.aspx?Species=&Test_Name=heparin&TstTyp=&WebDisc=6 (2015-06-03)
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  • Heparin
    treatment regimens Human dosage guidelines UFH High dose 400 to 800 U kg 24 hr Low dose 200 to 300 U kg 24 hr LMWH High dose 100 U kg 12 hr Low dose 2 000 to 5 000 U adult 24 hr Veterinary dosage guidelines have not yet been defined Recent studies indicate that adjusted dose UFH may be more effective than fixed dose therapy for canine IMHA slide 11 and that LMWH has shorter half life in dogs cats and foals than in people each linked torefs below Heparin Monitoring see Heparin anti Xa Assay FAQs Clinical status All patients receiving heparin should be closely examined to detect disease progression or signs of bleeding and bruising the major complication of heparin therapy Clotting time tests Clotting time tests ACT and aPTT link to aPTT test assess UFH anticoagulant effect and can be used to detect excess anticoagulation before clinical signs develop Target prolongation for high dose UFH therapy is 1 5X to 2X clotting time of the patient s baseline value Clotting time tests are not useful for monitoring LMWH Heparin anti Xa assays slides 12 13 Heparin anti Xa assays gauge anticoagulant intensity of UFH and LMWH High anti Xa activity indicates high heparin anticoagulant effect Target peak anti Xa ranges for animals are adapted from human guidelines pending species specific clinical studies Target ranges for UFH Therapeutic range high intensity anticoagulation 0 3 to 0 7 Units mL Prophylactic range low intensity anticoagulation 0 1 to 0 4 Units mL Ranges are based on human treatment trials Target ranges for LMWH Therapeutic range high intensity anticoagulation 0 5 to 1 2 Units mL Prophylactic range low intensity anticoagulation 0 2 to 0 5 Units mL Ranges are based on human treatment trials Sampling for peak anticoagulant effect Steady state sample after 24 to 48 hours of starting heparin Canine peak sample 3 hours after SQ dose Feline peak sample 2 hours after SQ dose Equine peak sample 3 to 4 hours after SQ dose References and Links Veterinary References Canine Kidd L Mackman N Prothrombotic mechanisms and anticoagulant therapy in dogs with immune mediated hemolytic anemia J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2013 23 1 3 13 PubMed PMID 23356703 Helmond SE Polzin DJ Armstrong PJ Finke M Smith SA Treatment of immune mediated hemolytic anemia with individually adjusted heparin dosing in dogs J Vet Intern Med 2010 24 3 597 605 PubMed PMID 20384956 Swann JW Skelly BJ Systematic review of evidence relating to the treatment of immune mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs J Vet Intern Med 2013 27 1 1 9 PubMed PMID 23279007 Smith SA Antithrombotic therapy Top Companion Anim Med 2012 27 2 88 94 PubMed PMID 23031461 Scott KC Hansen BD DeFrancesco TC Coagulation effects of low molecular weight heparin compared with heparin in dogs considered to be at risk for clinically significant venous thrombosis J Vet Emerg Crit Care San Antonio 2009 Feb 19 1 74 80 PMID 19691587 http www

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/Coag/test/faqhep.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Education Training Veterinary Support Services Contact AHDC CVM Home AHDC My Account Test Search for AHDC Clients Species Key Word Test Type Lab Section All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelid Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Services

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/test/list.aspx?Species=&Test_Name=protein%20c&TstTyp=&WebDisc=COAG (2015-06-03)
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  • Algorithms
    Supplies Vet Support Services Results Standard Results NYSCHAP Results Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Disease Bacteriology Mycology Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk QMPS Serology Immunology Toxicology Virology Programs CEM Quarantine NYSCHAP Referrals Veterinary Support Services Resources AHDC Research About AHDC About AHDC People Giving Comparative Coagulation View Results Tests Fees Sampling Instructions Shipping Information Submission Form Testing FAQ s Contact Coagulation Lab Contact AHDC Protein

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/Coag/clinical/proteincalgorithms.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Protein C
    and the combined deficiencies of Protein C antithrombin and fibrinogen are associated with a poor prognosis in this patient population Intra or post hepatic biliary obstruction may impair vitamin K metabolism causing inadequate vitamin K to maintain functional levels of Protein C Due to its short half life measurement of Protein C activity is an early indicator of vitamin K deficiency that is detectable before signs of coagulopathy Protein C testing in non hepatic disorders Protein C deficiency may develop in patients with sepsis systemic inflammatory syndromes and disseminated intravascular coagulation Protein C deficiency has been associated with development of thrombosis in dogs with parvovirus infection and as a poor prognostic indicator in dogs with bacterial sepsis High Protein C activity has recently been described as a unique abnormality that differentiated dogs with protein losing nephropathy from those with non protein losing renal failure Additional studies are needed to clarify the role of Protein C testing in these clinical patient populations back to top Protein C in Disease Hereditary Protein C deficiency states In people inactivating Protein C mutations are a rare cause of severe perinatal thrombosis referred to as purpura fulminans Heterozygous carriers of these mutations typically demonstrate a mild prothrombotic tendency A functional lack of APC s anticoagulant effect is among the most common hereditary thrombophilic conditions in people of Northern European ancestry A mutation in Factor V Factor V Leiden OMIM 188055 renders the cofactor resistant to APC s proteolytic degradation and therefore enhances thrombin generation through dysregulation of the coagulation cascade In veterinary medicine a single case report describes congenital Protein C deficiency in a thoroughbred foal Acquired Protein C deficiency states Acquired Protein C deficiency develops much more commonly in veterinary medicine often in association with liver disease In particular severe Protein C deficiency develops in patients with liver failure and congenital portosystemic vascular anomalies PSVA Protein C s short plasma half life likely contributes to the development of Protein C deficiency secondary to hepatic synthetic failure The etiopathogenesis of Protein C deficiency secondary to portosystemic shunting is not yet well defined In addition to liver disease vitamin K deficiency of any cause will cause a functional Protein C defect due to impaired post translational processing and an inability of Protein C to interact with coagulation complexes Protein C deficiency attributed to consumption and depletion has also been reported in patients with sepsis acute inflammatory syndromes and disseminated intravascular coagulation back to top Protein C Synthesis and Actions Hepatic synthesis and cell surface activation Protein C is a vitamin K dependent serine protease anticoagulant that is structurally similar to the vitamin K dependent coagulation factors Factors II VII IX X These proteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and all require post translational gamma carboxylation to bind Ca and attain a fully functional form Protein C circulates as a zymogen that is activated at the surface of endothelial cells by interacting with thrombin bound to its endothelial cell receptor thrombomodulin TM This Protein C thrombin

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/Coag/clinical/proteinC_long.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Endocrinology: Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Assay Testing Schedule and Price List The Endocrinology Lab s clinical diagnostic testing service assay schedule and price list are available in the links below Please note it is recommended the samples arrive on the day prior to the test assay setup times indicated on the schedule If you have any questions about scheduling please call 607 253 3673 Endocrinology Lab ROUTINE Testing Schedule HOLIDAY Testing Schedule Endocrinology Lab Price List We provide accurate reliable and equitably priced testing for many hormones and vitamins in a broad array of species primarily canine equine feline and bovine but some exotics as well Our veterinarians and technical staff offer pre testing advice and free consultations on post testing results The lab is certified by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals OFA to provide testing for the Canine Thyroid Registry Sample Submissions The condition and quality of the specimen we receive plays a major factor in the accuracy of test results Please do not send whole blood Serum is the preferred sample type for the majority of the endocrine tests we offer with the exception of ACTH which requires EDTA plasma Please review the links for Submission Guidelines for Endocrinology Samples Instructions for OFA Thyroid Registry and Application for Canine Thyroid Registry or feel free to contact the laboratory directly with any specific questions 607 253 3673 Results Reporting and Consultations Contact the Endocrinology Laboratory directly at 607 253 3673 regarding any test results interpretations or sample discrepancies Veterinarians or the authorized submitter should have their AHDC account number ready when

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/Endo/index.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Baermann Technique Information Test Code BAERF Test Name Baermann Fecal Technique Contact Name Dr Susan Wade Contact Telephone 607 253 3581 E mail sew9 cornell edu Test Method Nematode larval identification Sample Required 10 grams of feces Collection container plastic leak proof container Transport Ship on cold packs Test Day M F Lag Time 2 3 days Species All species Results Format Positive with identification of nematode larvae detected or Negative for parasites Interpretation This technique is a modification of the Berlese Apparatus used by entomologists to collect insects from plant material and soil It is used to retrieve nematode larvae from feces soil plant matter or other organic material The Baermann Technique operates on the principle that the nematode larvae wiggle out of the biological material cannot swim against gravity and will fall through the water to the area of clamped off tubing The clamp is released to collect the larvae for identification Any fecal sample submitted for this procedure must be freshly voided so that the sample is not

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/Paras/tests/baermann.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Cryptosporidium ELISA Test Information Test Code CRYPTO Test Name Cryptosporidium ELISA Contact Name Dr Susan Wade Contact Telephone 607 253 3581 E mail sew9 cornell edu Test Method Antigen capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay Sample Required 10 grams of feces Collection container plastic leak proof container Transport Ship on cold packs Test Day Wednesday Lag Time 1 8 days Species All species Results Format Positive or Negative Interpretation The Alexon Cryptosporidium Monoclonal Antigen Capture Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay ELISA is a fecal procedure designed to detect a Cryptosporidium specific antigen This procedure is done in parallel with a double centrifugation concentration flotation procedure for Cryptosporidium oocysts and any other parasites that may be present in the fecal sample The results of this test can be interpreted as follows Cryptosporidium ELISA Positive Flotation Positive The animal is infected with Cryptosporidium Cryptosporidium ELISA Positive Flotation Negative The animal may be infected with Cryptosporidium but is shedding oocysts below

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/Paras/tests/crypto.cfm (2015-06-03)
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