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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Sand Recovery from Horse Feces Test Code SAND Test Name Sand Recovery from Horse Feces Contact Name Dr Susan Wade Contact Telephone 607 253 3581 E mail sew9 cornell edu Test Method Recovery of sand from feces Sample Required 200 grams of feces Collection container Plastic leak proof container Transport Ship without cold packs Test Day M F Lag Time 1 3 days Species Horse Results Format Sand Recovered or Sand Not Recovered Interpretation Consumption of sand and dirt by horses may be associated with diarrhea weight loss and colic due to irritation and obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract The purpose of this test is to recover sand from fresh fecal samples to aid in the diagnosis of sand retention in horses Horses maintained in sandy areas fed on the ground or that have a history of living in sandy areas may accumulate large amounts of sand in the gastrointestinal tract Results of fecal sand analysis may vary from sample to sample without treatment due to manure production natural expulsion of the sand from the intestine location of the sand in the intestine and manure consistency A minimum of 200 grams of dirt free feces is needed for this test This is approximately 8 10 fecal balls from a light horse breed 6 7 fecal balls from a draft horse breed and 12 14 fecal balls from a miniature horse The amount of sand will be reported as based on a 200 gram sample No Sand Recovered or Sand Recovered If sand is recovered from the fecal sample this finding may may not correlate with the amount of

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/Paras/tests/sand.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Skin Scrapings KOH Digestion Test Code SSE Test Name Skin Scraping KOH Digestion Contact Name Dr Susan Wade Contact Telephone 607 253 3581 E mail sew9 cornell edu Test Method Microscopic Examination and Digestion Sample Required Representative sample of skin lesion Collection container plastic escape proof container or ointment tin Transport Ship on cold packs Test Day M F Lag Time 1 4 days Species All species Results Format Identification of parasite recovered or No Ectoparasites Detected Interpretation Skin scrapings for ectoparasites must be submitted in an escape proof container such as a plastic container with a screw top or an ointment tin All samples must be representative of the lesions on the animal Skin scrapings for the diagnosis of mange must be collected in a way that takes into account the nature of the lesion and the location of the mite causing the lesion Deep dwelling mites such as Sarcoptes Demodex that cause minimal epidermal hyperplasia and lesions may be recovered by doing the following dip a scalpel blade in mineral oil pinch a fold of skin between the thumb and forefinger hold blade at right angles to the skin scrape until blood begins to seep from the abrasion and place the scalpel blade with material removed into an escape proof container Remember that unless you draw blood you are not doing a good scraping Surface dwelling mites such as Chorioptes or lice that produce epidermal hyperplasia and exfoliation and lesions may be recovered by scraping

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/Paras/tests/sse.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Toxoplasma Modified Agglutination Test Test Code MAT Test Name Toxoplasma Modified Agglutination Test Contact Name Dr Susan Wade Contact Telephone 607 253 3581 E mail sew9 cornell edu Test Method IgG Agglutination Sample Required 1 ml of serum Collection container Red top tube Transport Ship on cold packs Test Day Thursday Lag Time 1 8 days Species All warm blooded species Results Format Positive or Negative Interpretation The Toxoplasma gondii Modified Agglutination Test is an IgG specific method for the qualitative or quantitative diagnosis of Toxoplasma infection by testing serum Other tissue fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid plasma or heart blood have not been validated for this test Titer Below 40 Negative or Infection too new to detect Titer Equal to or Above 40 Chronic or Acute Infection A second serum sample drawn 2

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/Paras/tests/toxo.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Protocols Test Schedules Research Development About the Parasitology Section Personnel Contact Parasitology Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Tritrichomonas foetus Identification Information Test Code TFE Test Name Trichomonas Fecal Examination Contact Name Dr Susan Wade Contact Telephone 607 253 3581 E mail sew9 cornell edu Test Method InPouch TF Culture System Sample Required Feces taken directly from cat s rectum Collection container InPouch TF Culture System available from AHDC Shipping Department Transport Unrefrigerated and by overnight shipping Test Day M F Lag Time Two weeks Species Cats Results Format Positive or Negative for Tritrichomonas Interpretation This method is used for the diagnosis of Tritrichomonas foetus infection in cats Since trichomonads do not form cysts and disintegrate quickly after leaving the host they cannot be recovered from fecal samples in the same manner used for encysted protozoa and worm eggs If

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/Paras/tests/tritricho.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Bulk Tank Monitoring Sample Submission Regulations and Submission Kits Full Herd Survey The most frequently used service of QMPS is the full herd survey whereby milking procedures management housing equipment and mastitis control are evaluated This service is for herds using an ongoing mastitis control program where a complete picture is desired or for herds experiencing problems with mastitis Trained personnel arrive at the farm toward the end of the milking and take composite or quarter milk samples from all the lactating cows using aseptic techniques Milking equipment receives a complete exam including pulsator graphs air flow readings and controller function Dry cow management housing conditions equipment maintenance and mastitis control are discussed and recorded When culture results are completed a comprehensive report is developed including recommendations based on all information available This report is then sent to the dairy producer and his her veterinarian If you would like to sign up with Quality Milk to receive herd testing please use our printable Survey Request Form Extension Survey This service is most often used by dairy producers who have large herds and consistently low somatic cell counts SCC An extension survey provides the same quality service as the full herd survey Animals with a high SCC are sampled as well as any individual animals that may be experiencing a clinical mastitis problem All other components of the full herd survey milking equipment dry cow housing maintenance mastitis control etc are included in this service Farmers concerned about stray voltage can request that QMPS visit and test for secondary neutral and cow contact voltage The test is recorded over a four to seven day period Dairy producers who are enrolled in the Dairy Herd Improvement Association DHIA have a further advantage in that those records are combined with the extension information

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/QMPS/FarmServices/farmsurvey.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    beginning of udder prep and the first unit attachment The point when all units are attached The point when all units are off The point at which all cows have exited Also measure the times of each part of the milking procedure such as start time and duration of pre dip ping foremilking drying teats and unit attachment To understand how to measure parlor efficiency here s an example of the fairly common double 12 parlor Dividing each side into two groups of six cows gets the timing of each cow s udder prep and the lag time between udder prep and unit attachment very nearly perfect Make adjustments in timing to accommodate your parlor Parlor assessment starts with cows filling the par lor Loading takes about 30 seconds plus one to two seconds per stall The ideal in our double 12 parlor then would be 30 seconds plus either 12 or 24 sec onds totaling between 42 to 54 seconds Once two to four cows are in their parlor stalls udder prep should start Udder prep and milk quality Some dairies that are intent on get ting as many cows through their parlors in the shortest amount of time willingly sacrifice udder prep By doing that they threaten milk quality Good milk quality depends on excellent udder prep which takes time Clean dry well stimulated teats yield the best quality milk through reduced bacteria loads on the teats and good mastitis prevention while in the parlor Research shows that the best udder prep routines lower bacteria loads on teats by 85 The cleaner cows are when they come into a parlor the easier it is to lower bac teria loads on teats through good udder prep For example clean teats may have bacteria numbers of 100 000 CFU cm2 of skin Dirty teats on the other hand may have bacteria loads of 100 000 000 CFU cm2 of skin An 85 reduction for both cases means that relatively clean teats would have counts of 15 000 CFU cm2 of skin vs 15 000 000 CFU cm2 after dirty teats are cleaned Here s a per cow breakdown of approximate times for each step of the prep procedure Teat dipping 3 seconds To pre dip all six cows 3 x 6 18 sec 6 sec to walk 24 sec Stripping 5 sec minimum Drying 7 sec To strip and dry all six cows 5 7 cow x 6 72 sec 6 sec to walk 78 sec Teat massage 10 to 12 sec to stim ulate good milk letdown Any less time and you ll have to depend on milking machines to stimulate letdown resulting in some over milking when machines are first attached Prep lag time 90 sec approxi mately between teat massage and unit attachment Unit attachment 5 sec To attach six units at 5 sec cow 30 sec 6 sec to walk 36 sec 24 78 36 138 sec 2 min 18 sec for the 6 cows What

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/QMPS/FarmServices/parlorefficiency.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    on the other is no fun As milking systems have become larger they ve also become more complex At one time recording thermometers were all you had to document whether systems were functioning properly Now computers are used to monitor all aspects of system cleaning Dealers are normally very good about leaving laminated copies of the washing instructions for a system including water temperatures and cycle length water hardness values and other factors It s a good idea to file a paper copy of the instructions in case the laminates are misplaced Keep in mind these instructions are product specific and apply to the particular cleaning products and water hardness used at the time You should check water hardness seasonally and provide new instructions with any cleaning product change NMC guidelines Just as it did to prepare a scheme for producers to follow to evaluate their systems milking function the NMC collaborated with dairy industry experts to develop guidelines that cover milking system cleaning The comprehensive guidelines provide a step by step plan to investigate cleaning problems NMC also provides templates to follow and fill in with the various readings Recommended temperatures Table 1 and cycle lengths Table 2 are two examples of the information available While beginning temperatures are important to evaluate hot water capacity and settings discharge temperatures can also be critical especially here in the Northeast where winter and sometimes fall and spring temperatures can rob heat from the exposed surfaces Likewise you should note pH values of discharge solutions to assure that the alkaline wash and acid rinse are in fact what they re supposed to be Initial rinse water should return clear to ensure that all milk has been flushed from the milklines prior to adding the hot alkaline wash solution The NMC Guide also suggests strategic sampling techniques to pinpoint a problem in a particular section of the system or a specific group of cows or milkers It also provides techniques to help pinpoint an incubation problem due to overuse of milk filters Most of these checks don t require sophisticated test equipment or expensive supplies A stopwatch pH paper and accurate thermometer along with careful observation of claws meters sinks and fill lines Is any air being sucked into the system at the end of a cycle can solve many cleaning problems Producers can use a stopwatch pH indicator paper and thermometer to gather information about milking system washing While the hot water detergents and acid rinses are what clean a system the slug of water formed by controlled air admission into the system is what puts these solutions in contact with all of its surfaces Analysis of slug formation and movement through the lines is arguably the most complex part of system troubleshooting Many different pieces of equipment can be used for this purpose QMPS personnel are being trained and getting the necessary supplies to provide these services along with their current culture and equipment analysis A case report A 350 cow

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/QMPS/FarmServices/equipclean.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    farmers who go above and beyond the high quality standards maintained in New York herds To become a Super Milk award recipient producers must meet certain criteria These include a bulk tank somatic cell count of 250 000 or less in at least ten out of twelve official monthly samples Milk inspectors must nominate producers by March 1st To obtain these criteria producers follow recommended milking procedures have well maintained and sanitary equipment and keep their cows clean and dry The Super Milk program continues to receive wide recognition from the industry and is important to dairy producers Collaborations are ongoing with other groups on the Cornell campus and throughout the SUNY system For the 2004 calendar year 1144 farms received the Super Milk Award Forty six farms qualified for the Super Milk Award every year for the fifteen years the program has been in existence Fifteen year winners received plaques with the farm name and were honored at the Empire Farm Days QMPS works in partnership with The Empire State Milk Quality Council which is made up of volunteers from all sectors of the dairy industry Members work to promote the improved quality of dairy products through education and recognition programs The Super Milk program is made possible by contributions from the dairy industry Bulk Milk Testing Through a grant from the New York State legislature we have further developed our Bulk Milk testing capabilities in the past year In an effort to better serve NYS dairy producers QMPS is considering expansion of offerings to include tests and procedures to determine different types of microorganisms present in raw bulk tank milk Rather than duplicate existing services QMPS will utilize it s unique expertise and infrastructure to provide information such as differential bacteria counts and laboratory pasteurized and coliform counts

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/QMPS/Programs/SuperMilk.cfm (2015-06-03)
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