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  • QMPS: Animal Health Diagnostic Center
    Resources AHDC Research About AHDC About AHDC People Giving QMPS QMPS Testing Farm Services Lab Services Fees Schedule Contract Research Education Training Forms Resources Publications QMPS History Who We Are Contact AHDC Test Search Perform a search of our test and fee catalog Select the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Northern Laboratory Canton NY Quality Milk Production Services 34 Cornell Drive Veterinary Science Building Canton New York 13617 315 379 3930 Phone 315 379 3931 Fax 877 645 5523 Dr Jessica C Scillieri Smith Sr Extension Veterinarian jcs385 cornell edu Gerald Bessette Extension Aide Field Technician gmb17 cornell edu Cathy Brown Laboratory Technician cab40 cornell edu JulieAnn Wilson Administrative Assistant jlw379 cornell edu Quality Milk Production Services Northern Laboratory SUNY Canton Canton NY 13619 315 379 3930 877 645 5523 fax 315 379 3931 Central Laboratory AHDC 240 Farrier Road Ithaca NY 14853 607 255 8202 877 645 5522 fax 607 253 4000 email

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/QMPS/canton/ (2015-06-03)
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  • Maternity Pen and Pre-weaned Calf Area
    For the most part cows freshen in the maternity pen Exceptions include summer freshening on pasture when the pen is occupied with two cows when the pen is occupied with sick cow s or when there is an excess of calves If a close up cow goes unnoticed in their tie stalls they may freshen on the platform floor Therefore some calves are born in the gutter The calves nurse their dams initially which may be as long as 8 hours if on pasture or unattended in the barn Somewhere between one and 8 hours the calf is taken to the other end of the barn where there is an L shaped wing which functions as a bedded pack where the calves are tied Here they may receive colostrum by stomach tube if the herdsman thinks the calf did not get enough colostrum naturally The calves are carefully tended and are fed whole milk from a nipple pail until they are taught to drink from a bucket at approximately two weeks The whole milk fed is either strippings waste or treated milk with milk going into the tank providing the remainder The barn uses a pipeline milking system sort of a 60 s design The calves are kept relatively clean and considerable skill is evident in raising them However the pack is generally spongy and damp It is cleaned out when it reaches about a foot in depth The owner says he has some problems with scours and pneumonia but the calves seem to respond to routine treatments with antibiotics and fluids There is no facility for sick calves Overflow can occur when larger calves fill up the pen and new calves are too small to crowd into the area with the older ones In that case the newborn is

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/smallfarmmaternity.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Heifer Raising Area
    the criteria below All Species Amphibian Avian Bovine Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Welcome to the Doe Farm Heifer Raising Area Heifers are weaned to a group of 25 straight stalls in a lower shed where the manure ramp is located The tractor and manure spreader are parked behind the calves and heifers to prevent freezing The manure spreader is also loaded there Dividers between stalls are two pieces of pipe some broken or disconnected from brackets One cow barn ventilation fan blows into heifer barn to keep the heifers warm and the manure spreader from freezing The calves have access to water bowls of which some work easily and others work very hard Some of the bowls are tipped which allows leaking of water into the manger Once a day the heifers are given the manger sweepings from the mature cows The sweepings are delivered by wheelbarrow across the cement floor where the tractor and manure spreader leave and enter the barn Silage and hay is delivered in the same manner The manger is cleaned monthly When this barn area is full the heifers are vaccinated with one dose of a 9 way killed vaccine and go out to the old shed barn in to a breeding pen AI is done on all heifers caught in heat A bull is kept in the breeding pen with the heifers and is used as a clean up bull for the herd When the bull begins to get mean he is replaced with another registered bull from a neighboring farm or through a

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/smallheiferraisingarea.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Lactating Cows
    F in an attempt to reduce cold stress on the cows The milkers prefer working in the barn at that temperature also Cows are milked twice daily using a 1 inch pipeline system with up to four units operating concurrently and on one side of the milking row or the other Milking times may vary up to two hours and ocytocin is used on a regular basis to encourage milk let down most cows are given between to 1 cc in the milk vein prior to being milked The herd is on test DHIA which includes individual cow somatic cell counts However records are reviewed primarily for pedigree information The BTSCC averages about 250 000 but does spike to 500 000 on occasion It is conjectured that since high BTSCCs seem to occur when they have a few cows develop hot mastitis that this is the most likely cause of the periodic elevation of the BTSCC Within the past 4 or 5 years there have been a few episodes where the raw plate count jumped over 50 000 A technician from the milking equipment dealer could not identify a problem with the milking equipment They believe they have a higher incidence of displaced abomasom and retained placenta than they should The herd veterinarian examines cows for pregnancy and reproductive health every 6 weeks in the winter but less often during the remainder of the year Cows are dried off and kept in the milking barn At drying off they are fed low qualtiy hay and some corn silage About a week from calving a little grain is added to the diet Cows are identified with metal DHIA tags and neck chain tags The neck chains are switched to other animals when cows leave the herd The herd is mostly closed

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/smalllactatingcows.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Maternity Pen and Pre-weaned calf area
    occupied by a sick cow The sick cow pen butts up against two pens where there are early weaned calves If that area is full or he fails to notice the cow freshens with the dry cows on the bedded pack The calf is separated immediately from it s dam make that when the owner notices It is immediately to him The stanchions have been removed and replaced with a series of wooden pens each about 10 feet square for the calves As these calves grow they are moved down the line to the next pen with larger calves already there Calves are moved from one pen to the next based on their size not their age It is a domino scheme and co mingling of animals all along this line is obvious There are six of these pens with the last two being the post weaning pens When the calf is born it is given colostrum by nipple bottle or by stomach tube As much as we can get down it according to the owner He says he tries for three quarts with a minimum of two quarts for each calf Colostrum is pooled and frozen and used if a dam does not have enough colostrum of her own The calf is then moved into one of the pens with other calves of similar size Calves are fed a 20 20 calf starter containing an antibiotic and a coccidiostat Nipple bottles are used and are rinsed at the end of feeding all the calves Calves are fed starting with the smallest and finishing with the largest A water pail is hung on the side of each pen with the exception of the first two pens the smallest calves Ventilation and light is poor throughout the barn The owner complains that his calf losses approach 50 His solution for the problem of mortality is to buy every vaccine he can think of and start vaccinating at day one or two repeating every two weeks Rotavirus E coli Salmonella vaccines are given in addition to the standard vaccines They are purchased from the route truck He has been dipping navels in straight Lugol s Solution for the past year and still complains of everything from scalds to umbilical hernias to joint abscesses The owner complains that it is costing him over 75 00 to vaccinate each of these calves and his losses still hover around 50 Dead calves are dragged into the woods at the edge of the heifer pasture Post weaning heifers are moved to two group pens that are 10x10 and are contiguous with the sick pens and the pre weaning pens see diagram Each group has 5 6 two month old calves in it The pens share a common wall that consists of a gate Calves are fed growing calf pellets corn silage and hay They have half a plastic barrel for water for both pens that gets cleaned when the pack gets cleaned The pack underneath is

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/largematernity.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Heifer Raising Area
    Camelidae Canine Caprine Cervidae Equine Feline Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Welcome to the Loe Farm Heifer Raising Area When the two heifer pens in the calf barn are full the heifers are moved to 4 super hutches holding 6 10 heifers They are vaccinated with a 9 way modified live vaccine These pens have a covered bedded pack They share common walls that are board fences Hutches are cleaned once or twice a year depending on farm workload Feeding is done along a raised feed bunk Feed consists of TMR not consumed by lactating herd plus a heifer TMR Waterers are frost free ball type Heifers are moved to a large open field that is downhill from the lactating barn Some water drains towards one corner of the field and accumulates in puddles This water comes from the end of the main barn where manure is scraped Heifers are fed TMR along a fenceline feeder This is about 30 feet long with two ball type waterers at each end When heifers are large enough for breeding they are moved to the breeding pen This is a long shed barn with an area of headlocks along the feedbunk A bull is kept in this area for breeding and is only used for the heifers Bulls are replaced based on temperament and age New bulls come from the Doe Farm A bedded pack is maintained under the shed Bedding is added once a week and the barn is cleaned at least once a year Feeding of the TMR is done along the feedbunk that is 35 feet long

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/largeheiferarea.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Lactating Cows
    the stream The freestall barn has two concrete water vats one on each end of the freestall Mattresses were installed in the freestall building about 2 years ago Lime is sprinkled on the mattresses a few times a week but no additional bedding is used Prior to the installation of mattresses sand was used for bedding An increase in the number of hock injuries has been noticed over the past year or two The cows walk a total of 2400 feet part gravel and part roughened concrete from the freestall to the milking parlor and back A skid steer with a rubber tire on front is used to scrape alleys once per day The owner changes buckets on the farm skid steer before driving into the feed bunk Manure from the freestall is mixed with the manure from the calf barn and spread on the fields A separate bucket is used exclusively for loading ration components into the TMR wagon after removing the half tire that they have used for cleaning The central feedbunk is filled with a TMR twice daily from a wagon which is driven in on one side of the barn and out the other After the mixer wagon is emptied it is parked next to the feed bunk where it will be loaded the next time a ration is prepared The TMR is balanced for the higher producing cows The herd milk fat test is running around 3 Forages are tested once at harvest Milk production has gradually declined over the past several years Milk production per cow has gone from 80 pounds to 60 pounds About 6 months ago the ration was adjusted by decreasing the amount of hay in the mix and adding 3 pounds of corn meal per cow per day The use of bST was instituted It does not appear that these changes have made much of a difference The herd is on test DHIA owner sampler Test information is used primarily for determination of rolling herd average and to keep track of SCC BTSCC runs around 350 000 with peaks up to 550 000 Prior to expanding from 200 to 300 milking cows the BTSCC remained very close to 300 000 All cows are treated with a penicillin based dry cow formula at the time of dry off Milking equipment has never been evaluated The owners have noted that it is hard to find and keep dependable milkers All the cows are bred by artificial insemination They have owned a semen tank for many years and recently about a year ago began to inseminate their own cows to cut down on costs associated with the AI technician They feel very fortunate to have been able to purchase 20 straws of semen from a valuable bull at a great price form a neighboring dairy that went out of business Cows that are treated with antibiotics are identified with a red leg band and moved to the treatment fresh cow barn to be

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/Sects/NYSCHAP/modules/vetcert/virtual/largelactatingcows.cfm (2015-06-03)
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  • Ddimer
    Ferret Fish Mammal Other Ovine Porcine Primate Reptile All Lab Sections Anatomic Pathology Avian Diagnostics Bacteriology Brucellosis Clinical Pathology Comparative Coagulation Endocrinology Molecular Diagnostics Parasitology Quality Milk Production Referral Serology Toxicology Virology All Test Types Infectious Non Infectious Quantitative D Dimer Assay D dimer is a specific degradation fragment of cross linked fibrin High plasma D dimer is an indicator of intravascular fibrin formation and plasmin mediated fibrinolysis Measurement of plasma D dimer concentration is useful to aid in the diagnosis of systemic thrombosis including pulmonary thromboembolism PTE and disseminated intravascular coagulation DIC Quantitative D dimer Assays Quantitative D dimer assays have replaced semi quantitative methods in medical practice When combined with clinical criteria the finding of low D dimer is useful for ruling out thrombosis and PTE early in the diagnostic work up The Comparative Coagulation Laboratory is now offering a quantitative D dimer test for animals in place of a semi quantitative test method A specific value rather than concentration range provides more precise monitoring for serial assessments of patient status Testing algorithms that incorporate quantitative D dimer may improve diagnostic accuracy for early identification of thrombosis Sample Requirements Submit at least 0 5 mL of citrate plasma shipped overnight on a cold pack Test Turnaround and Costs Same day reporting the test is run daily M F with results posted on line and faxed by request as soon as the assay is complete Quantitative D Dimer assay fee Test Principle Plasma D dimer is detected in an automated turbidometric immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies bound to latex beads Results are reported as D dimer concentration ng mL compared to a same species standard Quantitative D dimer assays are routinely offered for dogs cats and horses Please call for information on other species References Freyburger G Labrouche S Comparabilty

    Original URL path: https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/sects/coag/test/Ddimer.cfm (2015-06-03)
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