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  • RETENTION, TENURE & PROMOTION (RTP) | Cal State Monterey Bay
    Disruptive Student Behavior Assessment CSUMB s Educational Model Assessment Overview Institutional Learning Outcomes Assessment Program Assessment Resources Assessment Myths Truths ABOUT TLA News TLA Blog Workshops Cooperatives Center for Academic Technologies CAT Office of Inclusive Excellence Travel Grants Innovation in Teaching Learning Grants Faculty Incentive Grants FIGs Global Engagement Opportunity Grants Sponsored Programs For New Faculty Teaching Assessment Resources Research Creative Activities Campus Program Overview Videos Faculty Support Teams Retention Tenure Promotion RTP Campus Resources Student Development Support Programs Distressed Disruptive Student Behavior CSUMB s Educational Model Assessment Overview Institutional Learning Outcomes Assessment Program Assessment Resources Assessment Myths Truths CSUMB Home Academic Affairs TLA Faculty Support RETENTION TENURE PROMOTION RTP RTP POLICIES Appendices RTP policy and appendices Calendar for due dates RTP Training module In addition we created a RTP Training Module as an overview of the process for faculty and reviewers requires sign in It is essential to consult the policy materials for specific details about the RTP process since the Training Module is only intended to be a supplemental tool Go to RTP Training Module sample portfolios Sample Portfolio Binders There are several sample portfolio binders for which TLA has permission to share with faculty These cannot leave the TLA office but faculty are welcome to make an appointment to view them during normal business hours eportfolios Taskstream TLA provides faculty support for creating ePortfolios in TaskStream If you are interested in exploring this electronic tool for creating your RTP ePortfolio online please let us know This web based platform requires that a faculty account be created in Taskstream com For more details contact us at x4574 Existing users may sign in directly below Other formats Contact Academic Personal for information about other acceptable formats for RTP Portfolios Sign into Taskstream RTP User Job Aide TASKStream RTP Videos

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/retention-tenure-promotion-rtp (2016-02-11)
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  • CAMPUS RESOURCES | Cal State Monterey Bay
    Grants FIGs Global Engagement Opportunity Grants Sponsored Programs Faculty Support For New Faculty Teaching Assessment Resources Research Creative Activities Campus Program Overview Videos Faculty Support Teams Retention Tenure Promotion RTP Campus Resources Student Support Student Development Support Programs Distressed Disruptive Student Behavior Assessment CSUMB s Educational Model Assessment Overview Institutional Learning Outcomes Assessment Program Assessment Resources Assessment Myths Truths ABOUT TLA News TLA Blog Workshops Cooperatives Center for Academic Technologies CAT Office of Inclusive Excellence Travel Grants Innovation in Teaching Learning Grants Faculty Incentive Grants FIGs Global Engagement Opportunity Grants Sponsored Programs For New Faculty Teaching Assessment Resources Research Creative Activities Campus Program Overview Videos Faculty Support Teams Retention Tenure Promotion RTP Campus Resources Student Development Support Programs Distressed Disruptive Student Behavior CSUMB s Educational Model Assessment Overview Institutional Learning Outcomes Assessment Program Assessment Resources Assessment Myths Truths CSUMB Home Academic Affairs TLA Faculty Support CAMPUS RESOURCES FACULTY AND STAFF GUIDE TO CSUMB RESOURCES Handbook with alphabetized list of all campus departments websites and contacts Faculty and Staff Guide to CSUMB Resources human resources In support of the CSUMB Vision Statement the Human Resources Department commits to providing quality services to every employee with consistency integrity and respect in a

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/campus-resources (2016-02-11)
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  • Distressed and Disruptive Student Behavior | Cal State Monterey Bay
    for any electronic devices used in the classroom except those medically necessary such as hearing aids etc Focusing on class material during class time Sleeping talking to others showing audible and visible signs of restlessness or boredom doing work for another class reading the newspaper checking e mail and text messaging are unacceptable classroom behaviors Waiting until the instructor has dismissed class to pack class materials so as not to miss important closing information Expressing disagreement civilly when and if disagreement occurs Disruptive VS distressed behavior Disruptive Behaviors The term classroom disruption means behavior a reasonable person would view as interfering with the conduct of a class Examples of increasing seriousness include from Oregon State University making distracting noises persistently speaking without being recognized repeatedly interrupting resorting to physical threats or personal insults distressed behavior Faculty and staff can play an extremely important role in referring students for help They are frequently in a position to first observe signs of distress and although it s not always apparent students typically hold faculty and staff in high regard Signs that a student is distressed include excessive class absences declining academic performance poor emotional control excessive moodiness sleeping and or eating habits that change dramatically excessive concern about personal health persistent depression talking openly about suicide repeatedly engaging in risky behavior responding TO MILD MODERATE AND SEVERE BEHAVIORS How should faculty respond to disruptive and distressed student behaviors Appreciating the complexity of this question is the first step One significant challenge is distinguishing benign disruptive behaviors e g immaturity from behaviors resulting from stress and anxiety Another is that different faculty will have different emotional responses to the same student behaviors Similarly a response that might be very effective for one faculty member may not be effective for another Such differences are not a matter of better or worse but simply reflect the reality that faculty student interactions are highly relational and context dependent The better faculty understand themselves and the many possible causes of disruptive and distressed student behaviors the more likely faculty will respond appropriately and effectively It is also important for faculty to realize that most are NOT trained counselors and that despite their best intentions faculty can sometimes cause more harm that good if they respond inappropriately to particular situations Nevertheless there are general guidelines faculty can use to increase their effectiveness in responding to and reducing disruptive and distressed student behaviors mild behaviors EXAMPLES Coming to class late Eating in class Sleeping in class Creating excessive noise with papers book bags etc Monopolizing class discussion Side bar conversations Tangential comments Side tracking Bringing dogs babies to class without instructor permission Leaving class early Passing notes texting Checking Facebook Twitter Ringing cellphone Poor personal hygiene e g noticeably offensive body odor responses Reflect on the nonverbal meaning of disruptive behavior that is exhibited by more than one student Are several students communicating that the material is boring or irrelevant If so try using structured experiences case studies role

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/distressed-and-disruptive-student-behavior (2016-02-11)
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  • CSUMB's EDUCATIONAL MODEL | Cal State Monterey Bay
    TLA Assessment CSUMB s EDUCATIONAL MODEL Components of CSUMB s Outcomes Based Educational Model vision statement CSUMB has a comprehensive vision statement that guides everything we do Mission core values CSUMB s MISSION To build a multicultural learning community founded on academic excellence from which all partners in the educational process emerge prepared to contribute productively responsibly and ethically to California and the global community CSUMB s Core Values Applied active and project based learning activities Interdisciplinarity Multicultural and global perspectives Technological sophistication Service learning Ethical reflection and practice Collaboration Outcomes based education CSUMB is an outcomes based university Outcomes Based Education OBE is a teaching methodology that clearly communicates the learning outcomes that will be achieved through active student centered learning in a lesson a course or a curriculum OBE stimulates student success through the demonstration of learning in a variety of well defined assessments How to Write SMART Learning Outcomes institutional learning outcomes These are CSUMB s institutional learning outcomes ILOs Intellectual Skills CSUMB graduates demonstrate competence in critical thinking written and oral communication information literacy and quantitative reasoning Personal Professional and Social Responsibility CSUMB graduates demonstrate ethical reasoning global awareness and civic and intercultural engagement in ways that promote sustainability and social justice and equity across divers communities Integrative Knowledge CSUMB graduates synthesize and connect knowledge skills and experiences across disciplines allowing them to address new andcomplex situations Specialized Knowledge CSUMB graduates apply knowledge theories methods and practices in a chosen field of study to address real world challenges and opportunities First year seminar All first year students take a first year seminar course with the following outcomes CSUMB Vision Values Goals Students relate the CSUMB Vision Statement Core Values and Academic Goals to their own educational and personal goals Academic and Career Planning Students create an academic plan that incorporates exploration of major andcareer and student development pathways Teamwork Students demonstrateteamwork through constructive participation in team tasks and effectiveinteractions with team members of diverse identities and perspectives Information Literacy Studentschoose a topic appropriate to the assignment identify search terms relevant tothe topic effectively search for and identify sources using the library booksand articles search tool and evaluate the relevance of search results General education These are CSUMB s general education requirements A1 Oral Written Communication A2 A3 Oral Written Communication Critical Thinking and Ethics A4 Oral Written Communication Critical Thinking and Ethics B1 Physical Science B2 Life Science B3 Laboratory Practices B4 Mathematics C1 Arts C2 Humanities C3 World Languages Cultures D1 Social Sciences D2 U S Histories Democratic Participation D3 Lower Division Service Learning D4 Upper Division Service Learning E Health Well Being service learning All native CSUMB students take a general lower division service learning course and a major specific upper division service learning course both of which meetCSUMB GE requirements For more information visit the Service Learning Institute These are the upper division service learning outcomes Self and Social Awareness Students deepen their understanding and analysis of the social cultural and civic aspects

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/csumbs-educational-model (2016-02-11)
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  • PROGRAM ASSESSMENT & RESOURCES | Cal State Monterey Bay
    Resources Assessment Myths Truths CSUMB Home Academic Affairs TLA Assessment PROGRAM ASSESSMENT RESOURCES Ongoing outcomes based assessment of student learning is a key component of CSUMB s educational model and essential for keeping our educational programs effective efficient and relevant to a rapidly changing world The campus supports the ongoing process of integrating assessment and improvement of student learning throughout all levels of the university starting from individual class sessions up through courses programs and the institution This worked is guided by CSUMB s Vision Statement and Institutional Learning Outcomes ILOs overview of assessment at CSUMB The documents below include CSUMB s comprehensive Assessment Plan that guides assessment at the institutional and program levels links to CSUMB manuals for completing Annual Program Assessment of Student Learning Academic Program Review and Academic and Administrative Program Review and other resources to support assessment at CSUMB linking assessment to teaching learning Linking Assessment to Teaching and Learning Peggy Maki one of the national leaders in assessment of student learning opens her preface to Assessing for Learning simply and succinctly Assessing for learning is a systematic and systemic process of inquiry into what and how well students learn over the progression of their studies and is driven by intellectual curiosity about the efficacy of collective educational practices That professional context anchors assessment as a core institutional process guided by questions about how well students learn what we expect them to learn based on pedagogy the design of curricula co curricula and instruction and other educational opportunities Through examining students work texts performances research responses and behaviors across the continuum of their learning we gain knowledge about the efficacy of our work p xvii As we engage in assessment we are able to take the knowledge we gain to make change and bring improvement to student learning outcomes CSUMB has built its programs on an outcomes based approach Articulating our intended learning outcomes is a crucial element of guiding what and how our faculty teach and what and how our students learn Assessing students achievement of our intended outcomes is essential feedback to identifying when our teaching practices are serving our learning outcomes and when and where we can make changes that enhance student learning That governments accreditors and others seek evidence of student learning as means of holding educational institutions accountable has led many within the academy to view assessment skeptically On most campuses the departments responsible for assessment are split off from the departments responsible for faculty development increasing the potential tension between the two areas CSUMB however chose from its inception to marry teaching and learning with assessment understanding that assessment is an essential partner for making informed and intentional decisions about curriculum and pedagogy We work consistently to make sure that our assessment activities provide us insight into student learning in order to guide our teaching choices As long as that s happening we can report our assessment findings in ways that will satisfy WASC The guidelines that assure this are

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/program-assessment-resources-0 (2016-02-11)
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  • INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES | Cal State Monterey Bay
    Excellence Grants Travel Grants Innovation in Teaching Learning Grants Faculty Incentive Grants FIGs Global Engagement Opportunity Grants Sponsored Programs Faculty Support For New Faculty Teaching Assessment Resources Research Creative Activities Campus Program Overview Videos Faculty Support Teams Retention Tenure Promotion RTP Campus Resources Student Support Student Development Support Programs Distressed Disruptive Student Behavior Assessment CSUMB s Educational Model Assessment Overview Institutional Learning Outcomes Assessment Program Assessment Resources Assessment Myths Truths ABOUT TLA News TLA Blog Workshops Cooperatives Center for Academic Technologies CAT Office of Inclusive Excellence Travel Grants Innovation in Teaching Learning Grants Faculty Incentive Grants FIGs Global Engagement Opportunity Grants Sponsored Programs For New Faculty Teaching Assessment Resources Research Creative Activities Campus Program Overview Videos Faculty Support Teams Retention Tenure Promotion RTP Campus Resources Student Development Support Programs Distressed Disruptive Student Behavior CSUMB s Educational Model Assessment Overview Institutional Learning Outcomes Assessment Program Assessment Resources Assessment Myths Truths CSUMB Home Academic Affairs TLA Assessment INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES Adopted by the Academic Senate on December 8 2014 Institutional Learning Outcomes docx file ILO 1 intellectual skills CSUMB graduates demonstrate competence in critical thinking written and oral communication information literacy and quantitative reasoning ILO 2 personal professional and social responsibility CSUMB graduates demonstrate ethical reasoning global awareness and civic and intercultural engagement in ways that promote sustainability and social justice and equity across diverse communities ILO 3 integrative knowledge CSUMB graduates synthesize and connect knowledge skills and experiences across disciplines allowing them to address new and complex situations ILO 4 specialized knowledge CSUMB graduates apply knowledge theories methods and practices in a chosen field of study to address real world challenges and opportunities notes The Institutional Learning Outcomes will be reviewed by the Academic Senate three years from their effective date Spring 2018 by which time the Assessment Committee will consider

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/institutional-learning-outcomes (2016-02-11)
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  • PROGRAM ASSESSMENT & RESOURCES | Cal State Monterey Bay
    Development Support Programs Distressed Disruptive Student Behavior CSUMB s Educational Model Assessment Overview Institutional Learning Outcomes Assessment Program Assessment Resources Assessment Myths Truths CSUMB Home Academic Affairs TLA Assessment PROGRAM ASSESSMENT RESOURCES program review process Program Services Review is a cyclical process divided into four main parts Detailed program services review planning The assembly and submission of a Program Services Review Portfolio includes both the self study and external review A committee report that provides feedback and informs the development of a Program Improvement Plan A Program Improvement Plan The bulk of the work occurs during the first three semesters of the 7 year review cycle At the end of the first three semesters the Program Improvement Plan and the feedback report from the Review Committee are attached to the front of the Program Services Review Portfolio The complete set of documents are then stored in both the divisional office and within the department unit following its review Biannual update reports on the progress of the implementation of the Program Improvement Plan are submitted to the AVP in Academic Affairs The flow of Program Services Review work is as follows Semester Activity Semester 1 Program plans portfolio and conducts self study Semester 2 External Review is completed then Program Portfolio is compiled and submitted Semester 3 Program Services Review Committee reviews Portfolio then Program Unit develops Program Improvement Plan Semester 4 14 Program Unit implements the Program Improvement Plan and completes biannual update reports to be submitted to their Dean AVP and to their Vice President academic programs annual program assessment Due dates Guidelines for Annual Assessment Plans and Annual Assessment Reports Submission Forms program review Academic Program Review Manual Sample Program Reviews Mathematics and Statistics Department 2012 13 Assessment Resources Click here for information on the following Rubric Design

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/program-assessment-resources (2016-02-11)
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  • Assessment Myths & Truths | Cal State Monterey Bay
    faculty s autonomy Truth Assessment of student learning is a means of increasing the mutual engagement of faculty students and staff in providing an optimal learning experience Assessment is a tool for faculty members to improve student learning Myth The results of assessment will be used to evaluate faculty performance Truth So untrue Faculty participation and ownership are essential for successful program assessment but assessment results should not be used to evaluate individual faculty performance The results of assessments are to showcase and improve programs Myth Assessment is another academic fad and if we wait long enough it will go away Truth Every indication we have says assessment is here to stay and will most likely increase The outcomes assessment movement has been a serious one since 1985 Its momentum is growing not waning All higher education accreditation agencies including WASC across the country now include the assessment of learning outcomes as one of their priorities Myth Everything is going well in our department so we don t need to do assessment Truth The primary purpose of assessment is improving the quality of educational programs by improving student learning There s always room for improvement Myth The most efficient way to carry out assessment is to assign a single faculty member the responsibility of conducting all the assessments Too many people and opinions would only complicate and hinder the process Truth While it is a good idea to have one or two faculty members spearhead the assessment process for the department it is really important and beneficial to have all faculty members involved Each person brings different perspectives and ideas for improving the academic program It is vital that all faculty members understand and agree to the mission goals and learning outcomes of the program Myth Course grades are adequate indicators of student learning Truth Traditionally the assignment of a grade to an individual student provides a summary measure about the student s performance in the class Usually grades do not convey direct information about which of the program learning outcomes were met or how well the student met the outcomes However there are ways to use grades in assessment For example when a team of faculty review the student s course work and assign the course grade based on how well the student achieved a set of program outcomes Myth Surveys of student satisfaction with a course or program are sufficient evidence of student learning Truth Student satisfaction surveys are indirect measures of student learning that is they measure student perception of learning rather than actual learning As a result indirect measures are not sufficient evidence of student learning however they can provide useful and actionable insight when coupled with direct measures of learning Myth There are too many students to assess and a sample of students would not demonstrate the effectiveness of a program Truth Sampling can be an efficient method of collecting student work provided the sample is representative of the students you want to assess and

    Original URL path: https://csumb.edu/tla/assessment-myths-truths (2016-02-11)
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