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  • Research
    arrangements with faculty as well as through the Archaeological Research Center ARC and the Anthropology Museum The ARC facilitates faculty and student research via funding obtained from contracts and grants The center brings together considerable individual and team expertise in the management of cultural resources throughout California and the western Great Basin Professional expertise is offered in prehistoric archaeology generally with specializations in zooarchaeology archaeobotany human osteology flaked and ground

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/anth/research/index.html (2016-02-12)
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  • ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER
    EDUCATION OUR LEGACY One of the ARC s key purposes is to provide undergraduate and especially graduate students with hands on experience in archaeological field methods specialized analytical techniques and report writing The Center is a non profit educational enterprise dedicated to training future professionals and better understanding the diverse threads of the Great Basin and California s past Students participate in both the field and lab components of projects get an opportunity to become proficient in one or more analytical specialties faunal and floral interpretation flaked and ground stone studies and learn how to use the data they collect to address particular archaeological problems Many of these activities lead directly to preparation of papers for professional conferences or form major pieces of the student thesis project Facilities vehicles equipment and collections maintained at ARC are available to students as are dedicated funds to cover costs of thesis fieldwork and specialized analyses like radiocarbon dating and x ray fluorescence of obsidian The active obsidian hydration lab is not intended for commercial purposes but is employed expressly in support of faculty and student research endeavors In addition to contributing to a strong resume increasingly important upon matriculation ARC research and writing experiences prepare students for a wide range of positions in the public and private sectors CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT OUR RESPONSIBILITY At the heart of the ARC are the diverse contracts and grants performed pursuant to the cultural resources management needs of numerous clients These provide the funds needed to lease labs and vehicles purchase equipment and support staff and student positions Indeed many graduate students cover many of the costs of school via their activities at the ARC and participation in various contract projects The two Co Directors Principal Investigators Mark E Basgall and Michael G Delacorte have a combined

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/arc/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Digital Ethnology Project
    without considerable exposure to Trobriand ethnography DEP will greatly simplify obtaining access to Trobriand texts which are currently widely dispersed The sheer volume of these texts over 15 000 pages imposes temporal and conceptual limits for researchers scholars preparing for the field and in the teaching of ethnographic analysis from primary source materials These materials are being scanned and then processed with Optical Character Recognition OCR software to produce machine readable texts Once formatted for machine readability the texts are stored in a database accessed via Zyindex Indexed digital texts can be searched in seconds allowing students to explore a complex literature in great depth Complex multiple comparisons tabulations and indices that are unfeasible with manual methods will also be made available Thus DEP will facilitate l the reinterpretation of received ethnographic data 2 the testing and revision of established theoretical precepts i formulation of hypotheses and 4 the charting of new theoretical directions A secondary but potentially more far reaching objective of this project is to provide a model which we hope will both stimulate and facilitate the creation of other digital archives We envision a future research teaching environment in which a digital throughway allows students and faculty access to complex textual discourses within which they examine and test contemporary knowledge DEP is directed at this future Time and Resources The DEP database has been under construction for two years during which time 14 monographs and 127 articles totaling 6159 pages have been digitized This represents approximately 45 o of the published corpus of Trobriand materials External grant funds are being sought to digitize an additional 4000 pages of primary source materials The texts to be digitized included six dissertations by Trobriand ethnographers two dictionaries and two extensive collections of unpublished Trobriand myths Fifty four per cent of targeted pages 2 200 have been published and can be digitized by Optical Character Recognition technology at a rate of 17 pages an hour this projection fits well with our previous experience with similar materials when recognition and editing are both taken into consideration The remaining forty six per cent of the pages 1 800 are either hand written manuscripts or photocopies made from microfilm and as such must be input through traditional keyboarding Background and Appropriateness DEP emerged out of the experiences of leading a graduate seminar on the Trobriand Literature Both of us have led the seminar over the years and we have supervised the research papers of over 75 seminar participants during this time In the evolution of the seminar student members began the process of compiling a comprehensive bibliography collecting texts documents and films as well as indexing and analyzing the collection Over the years in the course of writing ethnographic analyses of Trobriand society seminar participants have created a variety of indexes concordances and lists in effect providing the genesis for the development of a digital research environment DEP began formally in spring of 1992 We began the task of securing primary materials and have

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/anth/research/Digital%20Ethnography%20Project%20.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Archaeological Curation Facility
    Northern California and adjacent regions We provide long term care for a wide range of archaeological materials including artifacts ecofacts maps photographs and site records In addition the ACF provides a setting for students interested in archaeology to gain hands on experience working with archaeological collections The ACF collections fall under the following themes Prehistory of the southern Sacramento northern San Joaquin Valley and Delta regions Prehistory of the northern Sacramento Valley and southern Cascades region of California Prehistory ethnohistory of the central Sierra Nevada foothills and uplands Prehistory ethnohistory of the southwestern Great Basin and northern Mojave Desert Selected mining and pioneer history of the Central Valley and adjacent regions of the Sierra foothills From the 1950s to the 1980s Sacramento State Anthropology faculty staff and students conducted or participated in archaeological excavations on public and privately owned lands This was a period of rapid urban development which threatened hundreds of archaeological sites traditional cultural places and historic locations Most of the items recovered from these salvage excavations were brought to the Department of Anthropology for curation Donations of private collections some of immense size were also accepted over the decades When the Department instituted the Archaeological Research Center

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/anth/curation/Archaeological%20Curation%20Facility/index.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Staff
    Staff Students Photos Research Archaeological Research Center Digital Ethnology Project curation Archaeological Curation Facility Staff FAQ NAGPRA Research and Activities Museum News and Events Scholarships Forms Careers Contact Us Archaeological Curation Facility Staff Dr Jacob L Fisher Dr Jacob Fisher is an assistant professor of anthropology and the NAGPRA Director for the Archaeological Curation Facility He received his doctorate in anthropology from the University of Washington As a zooarchaeologist Dr Fisher studies animal bones from sites in California and the Great Basin to provide a greater understanding of past relationships between humans and animals such as hunting and cooking practices Dr Fisher s interest in Native American relationships with archaeologists began in his undergraduate years and was further developed as a graduate student working at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture in Seattle on NAGPRA repatriations 916 278 4555 jlfisher csus edu Website Wendy J Nelson Ph D Dr Nelson is the NAGPRA Research Specialist at the Archaeological Curation Facility She is responsible for reviewing archaeological collections conducting archival research and writing summary reports for projects that fall under NAGPRA as well as participating in NAGPRA consultations with tribes and repatriation of human remains and funerary objects Dr

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/anth/curation/Archaeological%20Curation%20Facility/Staff.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FAQ
    Collections are not generally available for viewing outside of formal research requests due to the limitations in staff time I would like to use collections stored at ACF for a research project How can I gain access to the collections All research requests must reviewed by the CSUS Collections Committee The research request form can be downloaded here The ACF does not permit research on human remains funerary objects sacred items and objects of cultural patrimony without explicit permission from descendent communities Does the ACF accept volunteers The ACF accepts a limited number of student volunteers every semester These volunteer positions help students gain relevant experience working with archaeological collections in a laboratory setting Volunteer duties often entail assisting the collections manager by performing routine maintenance to the collections archiving documents photographing collections and by providing aide for special projects The volunteer application can be downloaded here How many collections has the ACF repatriated under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act NAGPRA 25 USC 3002 Section 5 As of November 2011 the ACF has repatriated three collections We continue to update our inventories to tribes consulting on collections and submit the requisite documents to National NAGPRA to allow for the return of cultural objects and ancestral remains to their descendants The ACF staff is primarily dedicated to actively addressing issues pertaining to NAGPRA Does the ACF loan collections for teaching or exhibits The ACF loans collections for research or exhibition All temporary loans must be approved by the CSUS Collections Committee The ACF also maintains an extensive teaching collection that is used by faculty for courses and ACF personnel for public outreach presentations and tribal monitoring workshops Please note that the ACF does not loan ancestral remains funerary objects sacred objects or objects of cultural patrimony I found

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/anth/curation/Archaeological%20Curation%20Facility/FAQ.html (2016-02-12)
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  • NAGPRA
    Graves Protection and Repatriation Act NAGPRA requires Federal agencies or any institution receiving Federal funding complete summaries 43 CFR 10 8 and inventories 43 CFR 10 9 for collections that include human remains funerary objects sacred items and objects of cultural patrimony and to notify possible lineal descendants culturally affiliated tribes or Native Hawaiian Organizations NAGPRA 25 USC 3002 Section 5 became Federal Law upon November 16 th 1990 Holdings

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/anth/curation/Archaeological%20Curation%20Facility/NAGPRA.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Research and Activities
    the most profitable taxa geese decline in relative abundance over time at SAC 29 A mix of harvest pressures and changing environmental conditions likely contributed to this trend Emilie Zelazo recently completed her master s thesis 2013 on faunal remains from six sites located in the lower Sacramento Valley including samples from ACF collections CA SAC 29 SAC 67 SAC 267 and SAC 329 Her study focused on developing a regional synthesis of diachronic faunal exploitation using a combination of paleoenvironmental reconstruction catchment areas and stochastic measures Results demonstrated that in contrast to previous conclusions foraging efficiency increased during the Late Period at the same time as diet breadth widened Quantitative analyses demonstrated that this contradiction was best explained by the introduction of new hunting technologies in the Late Period which increased hunting efficiency of large mammals and anadromous fishes Past Projects In 2013 14 ACF received a Associated Students Inc ASI External Grant to fund further developments to our volunteer program The ASI Grant will be used to improve the volunteer program by funding a series of Volunteer Training Workshops and to support a part time Student Outreach Assistant position In 2012 13 ACF received a University Enterprises Inc UEI Campus Grant to fund a volunteer project on rehabilitation of photographic archives Due to the destructive nature of archaeology the photographic archives associated with artifact collections are an important component of the archaeologial record while also providing a rich source of data on the history of archaeology conducted by Sacramento State since the 1950s Students rehabilitated photographs slides and negatives using stablizing archival material and organizing these images to be used for research by faculty staff and students at Sacramento State and beyond to assist in repatriations under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act and to exhibit the history of the Department of Anthropology to the campus community In 2011 ACF was awarded a NAGPRA Consultation Documentation Grant for the American River Project This grant funded NAGPRA actions for a series of historically occupied sites located along the American River in Sacramento County The project consists of consultation developing and sharing a GIS spatial database with tribes rehabilitation and inventorying This project will serve to expedite the consultation process first by consolidating collections from sites that are related geographically and chronologically and second by presenting information in a user friendly GIS format It is anticipated that this project will result in the repatriation of five sites In 2011 12 ACF was contracted to rehabilitate archaeological collections from CA MAD 177 located in Hensley Reservoir in Madera County In 2011 12 ACF was contracted to rehabilitate archaeological collections from Bennett Mound Nawean CA SAC 16 located approximately four miles northwest of downtown Sacramento Artifact typology and burial patterns indicate that the site was in use from the Middle Horizon and into the Historic Period ACF holds collections from five discrete field operations at the site from the 1920s to 1990 Analysis of materials from the site is currently

    Original URL path: http://www.csus.edu/anth/curation/Archaeological%20Curation%20Facility/research.html (2016-02-12)
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