archive-edu.com » EDU » D » DUKE.EDU

Total: 837

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    student led activities focused on bacteria and genetics specifically demonstrating the genetics of smell and taste using different odors and sodium benzoate paper and how vaccines work using puzzle pieces They also brought some Personal Protective Equipment PPE and gave a talk about bio containment and conducted a matching game where participants were challenged to match the location in the house where a bacterial swab was taken with the plate

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/science_stars.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    our zebrafish model but also in people said Tobin who is also with the Duke Center for Microbial Pathogenesis People with different versions of this gene appear to be vulnerable for opposite reasons either too little inflammation or too much So people with different gene variants might benefit from different therapies targeted to their individual genotypes Seok Yong Lee PhD an assistant professor in the Duke Department of Biochemistry and member of the Duke Ion Channel Research Unit will use the funds to uncover the chemical and physical secrets of ion channels which help critical processes occur at lightning speed throughout the body Lee said of the news I am very excited I wouldn t be able to win this award without the support of the Biochemistry Department and the Duke Ion Channel Research Unit With this award we plan to study biophysics and pharmacology of the voltage gated sodium channel Nav1 7 which has potential to provide new insights into future analgesic pain reduction development Nicolas Buchler PhD is an assistant professor with joint appointment in the departments of biology and physics and also an investigator in the Institute for Genome Sciences Policy He will use his award to develop computer simulations and lab experiments in yeast to understand the extent to which the single celled organisms gene networks can learn and predict the statistical regularities of their environment Charles Gersbach PhD an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the Pratt School of Engineering plans to develop technologies to create new therapies for muscular dystrophy or heart disease by regenerating new cells to replace faulty or missing ones This involves reprogramming the gene expression of easily accessible cells such as a patient s own skin cells to create new muscle bone cartilage blood vessel or heart tissue cell types

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/nih_innovators.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    of how a formerly tropical fungus could find new territory for infection in temperate climates Importantly we found that isolates causing the outbreak and those infecting AIDS patients are completely different VGII vs VGIII said co lead author Edmond Byrnes PhD a recent graduate from the Heitman laboratory Wenjun Li PhD also a co lead author and researcher in the Heitman laboratory noted that based on the fungal isolate samples taken from patients those with C gattii may experience resistance to the commonly used azole drugs that combat fungal infections and clinicians might be better aware of potential treatment problems if they knew the species Because cryptococcal strains are responsible for over 620 000 deaths annually and responsible for one third of all AIDS deaths this species distinction may be of public health importance There may be an unrecognized health burden in AIDS patients attributable to C gattii rather than C neoformans Heitman said He said that while a simple test is all that is needed to distinguish the two strains few clinical microbiology labs or hospitals even in developed countries are equipped to distinguish C neoformans from C gattii Heitman said that he doesn t believe that there is any human to human transmission of C gattii but rather patients are being exposed in the environment For example one AIDS patient from San Diego had an isolate that was traced back to a type of tree which is a common place to find C gattii in Australia and elsewhere This study clearly illustrates that AIDS patients in certain areas of the world might be infected by two different cryptococcal species said J ohn R Perfect MD professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center Although the outcome of infection in comparison between the two species remains uncertain this study

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/heitman_9.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    The laboratory s recent work has emphasized studies of the mechanism of the poliovirus RNA dependent RNA polymerase and its cooperative interaction with template RNAs as well as the inhibition of protein secretion and evasion of the cellular immune response by non enveloped RNA viruses Dr Kirkegaard has received a number of awards including the Searle Scholar s Award a David and Lucile Packard Fellowship an American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Research Award and an appointment as an Ellison Senior Scholar in Global Infectious Disease In 2006 she was awarded a prestigious National Institutes of Health NIH Director s Pioneer Award which will support her investigation of how the dengue West Nile hepatitis C and polio viruses develop drug resistance and how to reduce the frequency of such occurrences The Joklik Distinguished Lectureship honors and commemorates the myriad contributions of Dr Bill Wolfgang Karl Joklik to the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Duke which he chaired to the institution specifically for his role as the co founder of the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center and to the broader microbiology community for his research program in virology service in founding the American Society for Virology and for his editorial work for

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/joklik_lecture_2011.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    in the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and Hilton at Research Triangle Park and will feature presentations from recognized experts in the field including Keynote Speakers Jennifer Doudna Thomas Tuschl Other Featured Speakers Robert Batey Benjamin Blencowe Elizabeth Gavis Wendy Gilbert John Rinn Branko Stefanovic Andrea Ventura Jörg Vogel Additional speakers will be selected from submitted abstracts Young investigators will be given special consideration and travel awards will be available Registration

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/symposium_rna_biology.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    cell from committing suicide when it senses that it has been invaded by a pathogen a common self defense mechanism giving Chlamydia bacteria an extended chance to multiply and stay hidden The study was the cover story in the July 21 print edition of Cell Host and Microbe Microbiologists and genetics experts led by Raphael Valdivia Ph D an associate professor in the Duke Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology completed the work that narrowed down the search to an enzyme that chlamydia produces a protease called CPAF Chlamydia makes this master protease that takes over the whole cell and prevents it from mounting an effective pathogen killing immune response Valdivia said Chlamydia is unique among pathogens in that it can co exist within humans without causing symptoms for a long time This reflects a careful balance between the host and the pathogen We think CPAF is central to this balance Therefore if we disarm it we can tilt the equation toward the human host and mount an effective immune response that will not only clear the infection but prevent it from re emerging The Duke chemists led by Dewey McCafferty Ph D a professor in the Duke Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry designed a molecule that could block the CPAF activity inside of human cells Typically to design a potent specific and cell permeable inhibitor is a complicated undertaking and inhibitor designs don t work right away McCafferty said But in this case it worked on the first try Professor Valdivia s group of microbiologists and my group of chemical biologists worked to establish which qualities we needed to incorporate into a CPAF inhibitor The results are very exciting because we have an inhibitor lead molecule that may form the basis for a new class of anti chlamydial drugs

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/valdivia_3.htm (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    1974 1982 and Clinical Mycology and Mycobacteriology 1974 1991 sections of the Duke Hospital Clinical Microbiology Laboratory He also served as the Program Director of the tri institutional Molecular Mycology and Pathogenesis Training Program 2003 2011 which is the only NIH funded training grant that specifically supports postdoctoral fellows engaged in research focused on fungi as model organisms or pathogens of plants or animals His contributions to medical education span 32 years 1975 2007 During this time he organized and taught the internationally recognized Duke Summer Mycology Course and Medical Mycology and was a small group laboratory instructor director in the first year course of Microbiology and The Body and Disease He also served as the study program director for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases His publication record includes 85 research papers and 68 chapters and reviews I have had the pleasure to work very closely with Tom for the last 18 years here at Duke said Joseph Heitman MD PhD Chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology Tom has been a truly outstanding faculty member a leader in the field of medical mycology a tireless mentor for students and post doctoral fellows and a very active member of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/mitchell_1.htm (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    and health research These grants are start up funds for established investigators or senior faculty to move research projects forward to the point of obtaining other independent funding or support for highly promising young investigators during a time when start up funds are limited A description of Dr Tobin s current research follows Tuberculosis mycobacterial pathogenesis and host susceptibility Tuberculosis kills almost two million people annually Our laboratory aims to understand the intricate interplay between mycobacteria and their hosts using a combination of model organism genetics human genetics pharmacology and high resolution microscopy By identifying key pathways utilized by the infecting bacteria and the host innate immune system we hope to discover new therapeutic targets and interventions to combat this enduringly destructive disease Using a Mycobacterium zebrafish model we have performed a forward genetic screen to identify new host susceptibility loci Zebrafish are natural hosts to Mycobacterium marinum the closest relative of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex Because zebrafish embryos and larvae are optically transparent we are able to visualize the complex details of mycobacterial pathogenesis in whole live animals The facile genetics of the zebrafish allow us to map and positionally clone affected host susceptibility genes In addition zebrafish larvae

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/tobin_1.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive