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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    in antibiotic resistance prokaryotic programmed cell death host pathogen interactions microbial community formation and dynamics and epimutation and fungal genomics They come to the program with outstanding records of academic and scientific success In the DSID Program the Scholars will have multiple opportunities to interconnect their basic scientific endeavors and interests with clinical infectious diseases while obtaining a panoramic view of the unmet clinical needs that may be addressed through basic and translational science The Scholars will spend time with infectious diseases physicians in the adult and pediatric clinical wards seeing patients with a range of both typical and remarkable infectious problems They will observe the infectious complications of altered immunity in patients with chronic diseases congenital immunodeficiency and acquired immunodeficiency such as with advanced HIV infection organ and stem cell transplantation and chemotherapy Furthermore they will get a firsthand view of problems in infectious diseases diagnostics and therapeutics including antimicrobial resistance and currently untreatable conditions Additional experiences will include intimate group conversations with guest faculty outstanding scientists who have taken clinical problems to the bench and often back to the patients themselves These conversations are centered on the development and maturation of careers in infectious diseases and immunity research

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/dsid_3.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    similar to vertebrate adrenergic receptors Aballay said OCTR 1 functions in sensory neurons that have the potential to sense pathogens or molecules related to inflammation suggesting that host catecholamines regulate immune responses in response to changes in the surrounding environment In addition the scientists found that the nervous system controls a family of genes that are part of a surprising unfolded protein response UPR pathway that is controlled by a different receptor an apoptotic receptor that has the potential to sense the damage caused by infecting microorganisms Aballay said that this work dovetails with the concept of endurance how a body learns to co exist with a pathogen by igniting not only immune pathways that keep the pathogen in check but also pathways that control the damage induced by the infection In this study exposure to the dangerous bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa up regulates genes to levels comparable to those induced by a well known stressor of the endoplasmic reticulum ER a drug called tunicamycin This study is the first direct demonstration that a bacterial infection can activate a non canonical UPR pathway to alleviate the ER stress that occurs in the cells during innate immune response against bacterial infections Aballay

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/aballay_2.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Duke University Medical Center Thursday April 7 2011 8 55am Bryan Cullen PhD Duke Opening Remarks 9 00am Samuel Speck PhD Emory University Of Mice and Men What MHV68 Can Tell Us about Chronic Gammaherpesvirus Infections 9 45am Deborah Spector PhD UCSD Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Atherosclerosis Revisiting the Controversy 10 30am Break 11 00am Vineet KewalRamani PhD National Cancer Institute The Biology of HIV 1 Nuclear Entry 11 45am

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/human_viruses_2011.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    focused on fungal microbial pathogens of humans and other animals to illustrate common themes and therapeutic diagnostic and preventive opportunities Among both basic and physician scientists the goal is to bridge those working on the pathogenic microbe via genetics cell biology genomics and the host immunology including both innate and adaptive immunity With respect to therapeutics the emphasis is on developed as well as novel therapeutics including both drugs and

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/keystone.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    field of cell signaling elucidating how the rapamycin sensitive Tor kinase pathway enables cells to sense nutrients and respond physiologically Mark W Dewhirst DVM PhD professor in Duke Department of Radiation Oncology and the Medical Physics program For his work on the role of hyperthermia in cancer therapy particularly its synergistic use with other treatment regimens Jack D Keene PhD James B Duke Professor in Duke Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology For leadership in microbiology and distinguished contributions to elucidating the essential roles of RNA and RNA binding proteins in coordinating multiple cellular processes Sally Kornbluth PhD James B Duke Professor in Duke Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology For distinguished contributions in elucidating mechanisms of cell proliferation and cell death and for contributions as Vice Dean for Research at Duke University School of Medicine Ann Marie Pendergast PhD professor in Duke Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology For distinguished contributions to the field of cellular signaling with groundbreaking work on the function of Abl tyrosine kinases in cancer development and infectious disease John D York PhD professor in Duke Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology and Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator For distinguished contributions to the field of signal transduction particularly with regards to the biology of phosphoinositides and inositol lipids As in the past Duke is well represented and this year the winners reflect the scope of innovative excellent research being done here said Dean of the Duke University School of Medicine Nancy Andrews MD PhD who was elected a AAAS fellow in 2007 It s an honor to be recognized by one s peers for performance at the highest level in science This year s group of Duke AAAS fellows represent a broad range of scientific interests from the most basic research

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/aaas_2011.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    system we hope to discover new therapeutic targets and interventions to combat this enduringly destructive disease Using a Mycobacterium zebrafish model we have performed a forward genetic screen to identify new host susceptibility loci Zebrafish are natural hosts to Mycobacterium marinum the closest relative of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex Because zebrafish embryos and larvae are optically transparent we are able to visualize the complex details of mycobacterial pathogenesis in whole

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/tobin.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    proposed that the cell was sensing that the virus is trying to take over When this oncogenic stress response is activated it keeps the virus in check and now we know why The Luftig group also learned how the Epstein Barr virus overcomes the cell s response The findings may eventually yield therapies to benefit people who don t have good immune systems and who need protection from a threatening EBV infection Luftig said This work appears in the Dec 15 online issue of Cell Host and Microbe Very early in many people s lives there is a huge expansion of immune system B cells infected with EBV But thanks to the oncogenic stress response and a strong immune system the majority of these infected cells are killed off and the person remains healthy Luftig and his group including lead authors Pavel Nikitin and Chris Yan found two enzymes called kinases which were critical in mediating this oncogenic stress response and preventing unchecked B cell cell growth called immortalization When the scientists blocked the ATM and Chk2 kinases unchecked growth resulted in 10 times more infected cells This burgeoning cell growth is related to several types of cancer including post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in which a transplant patient gets a form of lymphoma because of B cell proliferation and HIV associated B cell lymphomas among others This finding can be extended to the general case of any oncogene being activated that might start the process of tumor formation Luftig said About 20 percent of all human cancers are caused by infectious agents and about 80 percent of these infections are viral Another example of a viral infection leading to cancer is the human papillomavirus implicated in cervical cancer Epstein Barr virus infection can mean different courses for different people In

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/luftig.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    elected to the Society for their outstanding records of scholarly achievement in biomedical research The ASCI represents active physician scientists who are at the bedside at the research bench and at the blackboard Many of its senior members are widely recognized leaders in academic medicine The ASCI is dedicated to the advancement of research that extends our understanding and improves the treatment of human diseases and members are committed to

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/chi_1.html (2014-06-13)
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