archive-edu.com » EDU » D » DUKE.EDU

Total: 837

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    the 1890s Featuring more than 100 expert authors from around the world this book offers the full range of scientific and clinical perspectives needed to create this unique comprehensive overview of Cryptococcus It covers both the Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii species examining in detail the life cycle pathophysiology molecular biology genetics genomics epidemiology immunology and clinical management of this encapsulated yeast Among the 44 chapters readers will find several in depth discussions of the C gattii outbreak that began on Vancouver Island in 1999 and then spread into the mainland of Canada and the United States causing infections in both humans and animals According to the ASM Press this book s detailed thorough reviews of all the latest advances and progress in the field set a new standard for publications dedicated to a single fungal pathogen While the book is dedicated to Cryptococcus it does draw analogies to other pathogenic fungi and more broadly to other microbial pathogens Moreover this volume demonstrates why Cryptococcus has become a model system for the study and understanding of fungal pathogenesis As a result molecular biologists microbiologists public health officials epidemiologists and infectious disease clinicians will all find this clearly written carefully referenced

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/heitman_6.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    missions of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers Stimpson s research is focused on identifying mechanisms of genome rearrangement and centromere inactivation using novel experimental systems to produce dicentric human chromosomes Stimpson works in the laboratory of Beth Sullivan PhD Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and an Investigator in the Institute for Genome Sciences Policy The NIA one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/stimpson.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    on understanding how RNA molecules control gene expression in cells and viruses Doudna s research on the molecular mechanisms of RNA interference RNAi induced her to explore the pathways by which bacteria employ small RNAs for adaptive immunity against viruses These studies led to the recent discovery of an RNA guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 that protects bacteria from foreign DNA but can also be programmed for genome engineering applications in human and other cells This work is transforming biological research in many fields and may one day provide new human therapeutics Doudna grew up amidst the natural wonders of Hawaii where she experienced volcanic eruptions explored remote beaches and honed her body surfing skills while living in the small town of Hilo on the Big Island Although there were no scientists in her immediate or extended family Doudna was bitten by the science bug in high school when she took her first chemistry class and participated in a science seminar series highlighting the chemistry of biological systems She now lives in Berkeley with her husband Jamie and her son Andrew an energetic 11 year old with an ear for music and a penchant for anything mechanical She enjoys gardening and hiking in the Berkeley hills Jennifer A Doudna PhD Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor of Biochemistry Biophysics and Structural Biology University of California Berkeley 708A Stanley Hall Berkeley CA 94720 3220 doudna berkeley edu Seminar The Biology of CRISPRs From Viral Defense to Genome Engineering March 27 2014 4 00pm 5 15pm 103 Bryan Research Building Reception to follow lecture The annual McGinnis Memorial Lecture was established by the staff and students of the Departments of Microbiology and Immunology in 1979 to honor the memory of James William McGinnis Jr Jim was born March 13 1951 in Greensboro N C He grew up in Cary graduated from Phillips Academy Andover Mass received a B S degree in Chemistry from Stanford University in 1973 completed the first year of medical school at Duke transferred to the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and was a doctoral candidate here at the time of his death March 11 1978 in a canoeing accident His research involved in vitro translation and RNase III processing of avian tumor virus RSV RNA The Ph D was awarded posthumously His postdoctoral work was to be with Dr Fred Sanger Cambridge England Science was Jim s first allegiance but he relished excellence in music sports literature and art He loved philosophy enjoyed nature and prized friendship Learning was exhilarating to him and to this good end the lecture is dedicated Since its inception the McGinnis lecture program has brought 36 exemplary speakers to campus including four Nobel laureates J Michael Bishop David Baltimore Phil Sharp and Elizabeth Blackburn and twenty seven members of the National Academy of Sciences including leading investigators in the areas of virology microbial pathogenesis and physiology molecular biology immunology and RNA biology Click here for a complete list of previous McGinnis Memorial

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/seminars/ (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Predoctoral Fellowship The fellowship is designed to help students initiate careers in cardiovascular and stroke research by providing research assistance and training Shertz works in the laboratory of Joseph Heitman MD PhD James B Duke Professor and Chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and Director of the Center for Microbial Pathogenesis The American Heart Association AHA is a non profit organization in the United States that fosters

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/shertz_1.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    of virus replication in poxviruses such as the vaccinia virus provides an extraordinary model system for both viruses and cell biology His studies have illuminated processes of mRNA capping transcriptional control of gene expression virus morphogenesis viral entry into cells viral interactions with host immune functions viral genome structure and viral DNA replication His research has translated to the development of powerful mammalian expression vectors and live virus vaccine vectors In addition to his work on poxviruses he has made major contributions to the understanding of HIV biology and immune responses against HIV Through his groundbreaking work in both of these fields he continues to promote the development of vaccines against HIV Dr Moss has received numerous awards and prizes including the Dickson Prize for Medical Research the Invitrogen Eukaryotic Expression Award the ICN International Prize in Virology the Taylor International Prize in Medicine and the Bristol Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Infectious Disease Research He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences American Academy of Microbiology Fellow of the AAAS and president of the American Society for Virology Dr Moss is currently an editor of Virology and a member of the editorial boards of Journal of Virology AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses Current Opinion in Biotechnology Advances in Virus Research and the NIH Catalyst He is an adjunct professor at George Washington University and the University of Maryland The Joklik Distinguished Lectureship honors and commemorates the myriad contributions of Dr Bill Wolfgang Karl Joklik to the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Duke which he chaired to the institution specifically for his role as the co founder of the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center and to the broader microbiology community for his research program in virology service in founding the American Society for Virology and for his

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/joklik_lecture.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    teams working through clinical problems in a case conference series discussing clinical and translational research trials through a journal club and discussing career paths in infectious diseases related research with guest faculty who are nationally and internationally recognized for their scientific contributions and for their translation of their work to the clinical arena 2010 2011 Duke Scholars in Infectious Diseases NAME MENTOR DEGREE PROGRAM Chen Ding Post Doctoral Fellow Dennis

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/dsid_2.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    said Most have a more complicated clinical course than people infected with the more common Cryptococcus neoformans Because the strain is so virulent when it infects some humans and animals the researchers are calling for greater awareness and vigilance Testing involves culturing the fungus and then sequencing its DNA to learn whether it is the virulent or more benign strain which could affect treatment plans Some strains of C gattii are not more virulent than C neoformans for example but doctors need to know what type they are dealing with Byrnes said Using molecular techniques the geneticists uncovered clues that showed the Oregon only fungal type most likely arose recently in addition to an outbreak of C gattii that began in Canada in 1999 that has now spread into Washington and Oregon Symptoms can appear two to several months after exposure and may include a cough lasting weeks sharp chest pain shortness of breath headache related to meningitis fever nighttime sweats and weight loss In animals the symptoms are a runny nose breathing problems nervous system problems and raised bumps under the skin While C gattii can be treated it cannot be prevented there is no vaccine The new type of C gattii reproduces both sexually and asexually The more virulent strain may have genetically recombined with related but less harmful strains This novel genotype is highly virulent compared with similar isolates of Cryptococcus that are not causing disease outbreaks The researchers found that the novel genotype VGIIc is now a major source of C gattii illness in Oregon Because C gattii types had been found in tropical areas before co lead author Wenjun Li MD PhD of Duke Molecular Genetics and Microbiology speculates that environmental changes may be responsible for the evolution and emergence of this pathogen Determining the

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/heitman_5.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Genetics and Microbiology Associate Professor of Immunology Duke University Medical Center The purpose of Triangle Microbial Interactions TMI is to facilitate communication and collaboration between microbial pathogenesis researchers in the greater North Carolina Triangle area All researchers with an interest in bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens are invited to attend The format of the meetings is informal to foster social interactions between PIs post doctoral fellows and graduate students To RSVP

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/tmi.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •