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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    established in 1961 in memory William Allan 1881 1943 who was one of the first American physicians to conduct extensive research in human genetics The Allan Award is presented annually to recognize substantial and far reaching scientific contributions to human genetics carried out over a sustained period of scientific inquiry and productivity Dr Willard s research interests include genome sciences and their broad implications for medicine and society human chromosome

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/willard_1.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    begins his duties September 1 2009 His appointment was announced by Nancy Andrews M D Ph D Dean of the School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at Duke University Medical Center Heitman has been recognized for his research that discovered targets and mechanisms of action for widely used immunosuppressants that revolutionized transplant medicine elucidated conserved pathways via which cells sense nutrients defined mechanisms enabling pathogenic fungi to cause infection and provided insight into how sex and sex determination evolve with implications for emerging and established microbial pathogens His studies have further contributed to define mechanisms and pathways targeted by antifungal drugs and novel drug combinations with potential therapeutic applications for Cryptococcus neoformans Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus and to provide insights into an outbreak of fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus gattii occurring in the Pacific Northwest and documenting its recent expansion into the United States I look forward to the challenges and opportunities in advancing a focus on microbiology and genetics and their intersection to contribute to realize the potential of the institution at the interface of science and medicine and to continue to develop a robust training environment for students and fellows who will the next generation of independent investigators Heitman said Heitman received B S and M S degrees from the University of Chicago in chemistry and biochemistry and MD PhD degrees from Cornell and Rockefeller Universities for studies with Peter Model and Norton Zinder on restriction enzymes and bacterial DNA damage and repair responses Heitman was an EMBO fellow at the Biocenter in Basel Switzerland where in studies with Mike Hall he initiated the use of yeast as a model for studies of immunosuppressive drug action that led to the discovery of FKBP12 and Tor as the targets of the immunosuppressive drugs FK506 and

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/heitman_2.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    develop insights into how clinicians evaluate diagnose and treat contemporary infectious diseases The fellows will also have special seminars with internationally renowned Infectious Diseases researchers to discuss current unmet problems in the field opportunities for cooperative research with clinical partners and translational strategies to develop basic discoveries into clinical applications Through this innovative program Duke will train a new generation of basic scientists who are better prepared to address emerging

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/dsid_1.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Aballay developed a novel pathogenesis system utilizing the simple well studied nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the common human bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica Aballay s research currently focuses on the use of C elegans as a host to screen thousands of bacterial clones from mutagenized libraries to identify novel Salmonella virulence factors and to address how they alter host signaling pathways His lab is also exploiting the genetic and genomic resources

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/aballay_1.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    falciparum gene regulation by human microRNAs The Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award provides 500 000 during a five year period to encourage multidisciplinary approaches to investigating pathogenesis BWF launched the program in 2002 and has made 78 awards for an investment of more than 33 million in the careers of assistant professor level researchers who are working on understanding the interactions between the human host and the

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/chi.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Duke NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore used RNA interference RNAi to unlock dengue s secrets RNA interference is a normal biological process cells use to turn gene expression on or off depending upon which gene products or proteins are needed at any given moment That very same system proved to be the perfect investigative tool for our study says Garcia Blanco Garcia Blanco and colleagues in Duke s RNAi facility were able to knock down gene function in fruit fly cells infected with a strain of the dengue virus known as DENV 2 Silencing one gene at a time there were about 14 000 of them allowed researchers to pinpoint which genes or host factors were essential to viral growth and which ones were not They used fruit flies as a model because the genetic tools needed for the same work in mosquitoes have not been developed yet The process yielded 116 host factors that appeared to be important to successful dengue infection in fruit flies In testing several of these host factors in mosquitoes at Johns Hopkins University researchers subsequently discovered that at least one and possibly a second was necessary for dengue infection to occur in the insects Scientists also infected human cells with the DENV 2 virus and found 82 of the mosquito genes had analogous genes in humans About half that number turned out to be dengue specific host factors important in human infection Each one of these newly identified host factors is a potential therapeutic target that could be used to block or slow dengue infection says Garcia Blanco Currently there are no vaccines to prevent the disease so new ways to fight the disease are important he added There are a couple of dengue vaccine candidates in development Scientists say the study reflects

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/mariano_2.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    as Fellows are elected through a highly selective annual peer reviewed process based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology The Academy serves as a resource to governmental agencies industry ASM and the larger scientific and lay communities by convening colloquia to address critical issues in microbiology Through its sponsorship of the American College of Microbiology the Academy certifies outstanding microbiologists and immunologists in

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/petes_cullen.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    More Genomic Analysis Uncovers New Targets for HIV Vaccine An international team of researchers including David Goldstein PhD a professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke University Medical Center has identified three gene variants in the DNA of 486 people infected with HIV that appear to have helped some of the patients fight off the virus and delay the onset of full blown AIDS More Valdivia Receives Merck Irving S Sigal Memorial Award Raphael Valdivia PhD an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at the Duke University Medical Center was selected to receive the Merck Irving S Sigal Memorial Award from the ASM for 2007 Dr Valdivia is honored for his established record of creative and independent research in the area of molecular and cellular microbiology More 2006 Living View in Animals Shows How Cells Decide to Make Proteins Scientists at Duke University Medical Center have visualized in a living animal how cells use a critical biological process to dice and splice genetic material to create unique and varied proteins More 2005 Chlamydia Escapes Defenses by Cloaking Itself With Lipids Duke University Medical Center microbiologists have discovered that the parasitic bacteria Chlamydia escapes cellular detection and destruction by cloaking itself in droplets of fat within the cell More Study May Reveal Custom Tailored Cancer Treatments Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have taken another step toward curing cancer Joseph Nevins Barbara Levine Professor of Breast Cancer Genomics has headed a new study that may eventually allow doctors to tailor drug prescriptions for individual patients More Novel Plague Virulence Factor Identified Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have identified a previously unknown family of virulence factors that make the bacterium responsible for the plague especially efficient at killing its host More New Strategy Guides Selection of Best Drugs for Individual Cancer Patients Choosing the best cancer treatments is often akin to throwing darts at a massive corkboard hoping to hit the desired target But scientists have now developed a novel method for selecting the most effective anti cancer drugs based on the patient s unique tumor activity More Thomas Petes Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences Three members of the Duke University faculty including Thomas D Petes professor and chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology were elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences this week More 2004 Genetic Discovery Paves Way to Decode Sense of Smell in Mammals Duke University Medical Center geneticists have discovered new proteins that help the olfactory system in mammals organize properly More Thomas Petes Named Chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke University Medical Center Thomas D Petes Ph D a professor in the department of biology and a member of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been named the new chair of the molecular genetics and microbiology MGM department at Duke University Medical Center More Fungus Sex

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/archives/ (2014-06-13)
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