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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Biology 4 e28 Chen S Y Wang Y Telen M J Chi J T 2008 The genomic analysis of erythrocyte microRNAs expression in sickle cell diseases PLoS ONE 3 e2360 Nuyten D S Hastie T Chi J T Chang H Y Vijver M J 2008 Combining biological gene expression signatures in predicting outcome in breast cancer An alternative to supervised classification European Journal of Cancer 44 2319 2329 Chen J L Lucase J E Schroede r T Mori S Nevins J R Dewhirst M W West M Chi J T 2008 Genomic analysis of lactic acidosis and acidosis response in human cancers PLoS Genetics 4 e1000293 Lucas J E Carvalho C M Chen J L Chi J T and West M 2009 Cross study projections of Genomic biomarkers An evaluation in cancer genomics PLoS One 4 e4523 Chan A S Kawahara T L Sutphin P D Change H Y Chi J T Giaccia A 2009 Tumor vasculature is regulated by PHD2 mediated angiogenesis and bone marrow derived cell recruitment Cancer Cell 5 527 538 Merl D Chen J L Chi J T and West M 2009 An integrative analysis of cancer gene expression studies using Bayesian latent factor modeling Annals of Applied Statistics 3 1675 1694 Pogozelski A R Geng T Li P Yin X Lira V A Zhang M Chi J T and Yan Z 2009 p38gamma mitogen activated protein kinase is a key regulator in skeletal muscle metabolic adaptation in mice PLoS One 4 e7934 Himburg H A Muramoto G G Daher P Meadows S K Russell J L Doan P Chi J T Salter A B Lento W E Reya T Chao N J and Chute J P 2010 Pleiotrophin regulates the expansion and regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells Nature Medicine 16 475 482 Lindsay R G and Chi J T 2010 Contact lens management of infantile aphakia Clinical and Experimental Optometry 93 3 14 Review Chen J L Merl D Peterson C Wu J Liu P Ayer D West M and Chi J T 2010 Lactic acidosis triggers starvation response with paradoxical induction of TXNIP through MondoA PLOS Genetics 6 e1001093 Sangokoya C Telen M J Chi J T 2010 MicroRNA miR 144 modulates oxidative stress tolerance and associates with anemia severity in sickle cell disease Blood 116 4338 4348 Lucas J E Kung H N Chi J T 2010 Latent factor analysis to discover pathway associated putative segmental aneuploidies in human cancers PLoS Computational Biology 6 e1000920 Sangokoya C Lamonte G Chi J T 2010 Isolation and Characterization of MicroRNAs of Human Mature Erythrocytes Methods Molecular Biology 667 193 203 Chi J T Thrall D E Jiang C Snyder S Fels D Landon C McCall L Lan L Hauck M MacFall J R Viglianti B L and Dewhirst M W Comparison of genomics and functional imaging from canine sarcomas treated with thermoradiotherapy predicts therapeutic response and identifies combination therapeutics Clinical Cancer Research 17 2549 60 2011 PMCID PMC3078971 Corresponding author Gatza M L Kung H

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/chi/pubs.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Jen Tsan Ashley Chi MD PhD Assistant Professor research biography lab members publications lab website Hypoxia Photo Left In Vitro defined Hypoxic Response of culture cells Right Genomic analysis of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/chi/hypoxia.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    at Nacional de Cuyo University and received a Pew Fellowship to move to St Louis where he continued his studies in endocytosis at Washington University In 1999 following an interest in bacterial pathogenesis he developed while studying the intracellular transport of Brucella abortus when he was a graduate student he moved to Boston to join the Ausubel laboratory at Harvard Medical School Dr Aballay moved to Durham in 2002 to join the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology where his studies focus on what makes bacteria pathogenic and hosts resistant In the Ausubel laboratory Dr Aballay developed a novel pathogenesis system utilizing the simple well studied nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the common human bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica Salmonella is well known for its ability to cause food poisoning Nematodes like C elegans eat bacteria and surprisingly C elegans is killed when it is provided S enterica as a food source This killing is accompanied by a persistent infection of S enterica in the C elegans intestine Importantly Dr Aballay has shown that several well studied S enterica virulence factors required for causing disease in mammalian hosts are also required for C elegans killing This validates the use of C elegans

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/aballay/bio.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    A lejandro Aballay PhD Associate Professor research biography lab members publications lab website Lab members Alejandro Aballay Associate Professor Brian Head Post Doctoral Fellow Argenia Doss Post Doctoral Fellow Natalia

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/aballay/lab.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Full Article as PDF Styer K L Singh V Macosko E Steele S E Bargmann C I and Aballay A 2008 Innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans is regulated by neurons expressing NPR 1 GPCR Science 17 460 464 Abstract Full Article as PDF Get a Review Haskins K A Russell J F Gaddis N Dressman H K and Aballay A 2008 Unfolded protein response genes regulated by CED 1 are required for Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity Dev Cell 15 87 97 Abstract Full Article as PDF Get a Review Tenor J L and Aballay A 2008 A conserved Toll like receptor is required for Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity EMBO Reports 9 103 109 Abstract Full Article as PDF Fuhrman L E Shianna K V Aballay A 2008 High throughput isolation and mapping of C elegans mutants susceptible to pathogen infection PLoS One 6 e2882 Abstract Full Article as PDF Styer K L Click E M Hopkins G W Frothingham R and Aballay A 2007 Study of the role of CCR5 in a mouse model of intranasal challenge with Y pestis Microbes and Infection 9 1135 1138 Abstract Full Article as PDF Singh V and Aballay A 2006 A heat shock factor HSF 1 response pathway is important for Caenorhabditis elegans immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103 13092 13097 Abstract Full Article as PDF Singh V and Aballay A 2006 Heat shock and genetic activation of HSF 1 enhance immunity to bacteria Cell Cycle 5 2443 2446 Abstract Full Article as PDF Burton E A Pendergast A M and Aballay A 2006 The Caenorhabditis elegans ABL 1 tyrosine kinase is required for Shigella flexneri pathogenesis Appl Environ Microbiol 72 5043 51 Abstract Full Article as PDF Kerry S TeKippe M Gaddis N C and Aballay A 2006

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/aballay/pubs.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    we were able to demonstrate that specific neurons can regulate innate immunity We are studying a number of signaling molecules that can be used by the nervous and immune system to communicate to each other Another line of investigation we are pursuing concerns the identification and characterization of receptors potentially involved in pathogen recognition and activation of immune responses We have demonstrated that the only Toll like receptor in C elegans TOL 1 is required to prevent the invasion of pharyngeal cells by the human pathogen Salmonella enterica The study of candidate downstream components of the TOL 1 pathway indicate that TRF 1 but not IKB 1 may be required for the effects of TOL 1 in immunity and that there may be other downstream components that regulate TOL 1 mediated immunity in a redundant manner We are also studying the immune function of the scavenger receptor CED 1 and a system of proteins involved in the unfolding protein response UPR that are required to prevent bacterial invasion of host cells In addition to pathogen recognition and activation of microbial killing pathways another important aspect of innate immune response is fever Fever is an ancient immune mechanism used by metazoans in response to microbial infections In mammals several studies have been conducted to understand the mechanism of fever elicitation and to develop antipyretic therapeutics However the mechanism by which increased temperature exerts its beneficial role remains unclear We use C elegans to study the mechanism by which increased temperatures activate the innate immune system We are also characterizing different C elegans mutants that are either more resistant or more susceptible to pathogens Since several components of innate immunity are conserved among different organisms throughout evolution understanding the basis of the immune response in C elegans should provide new insight into

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/aballay/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Stanford University in 1994 and from 1999 2005 was Wolfson Professor of Genetics at University College London In April 2007 he was appointed Honorary Professor Institute of Neurology University College London UK Dr Goldstein is the author of over 200 scholarly publications in the areas of population and medical genetics His principal interests include human genetic diversity the genetics of disease and pharmacogenetics He was elected a fellow of AAAS

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/goldstein/bio.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Variation research biography lab members publications lab website Lab members The Center for Human Genome Variation consists of an interactive group of faculty students and staff To learn more about us please select a link below David B Goldstein PhD

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/goldstein/lab.htm (2014-06-13)
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