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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    has evolved a unique mechanism by which it promotes synthesis of viral proteins Translation of HCV RNA depends upon an element within the viral 5 untranslated region UTR known as the internal ribosome entry site IRES The HCV IRES has evolved to efficiently recruit host ribosomes in a 7 methylguanosine cap independent manner I am interested in understanding the role of RNA protein interactions in regulation of HCV IRES activity

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/bradrick/index.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    hope to discover new therapeutic targets and interventions to combat this enduringly destructive disease Using a Mycobacterium zebrafish model we have performed a forward genetic screen to identify new host susceptibility loci Zebrafish are natural hosts to Mycobacterium marinum the closest relative of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex Because zebrafish embryos and larvae are optically transparent we are able to visualize the complex details of mycobacterial pathogenesis in whole live animals

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/tobin/index.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    H3 by the centromeric histone variant CENP A Using high resolution fluorescence microscopy and optical mapping we have shown that centromeric chromatin CEN chromatin contains interspersed subdomains of CENP A and H3 nucleosomes Since CEN chromatin also contains H3 we are interested in determining if modifications of core histones functionally distinguish centromeres from other regions of the genome Centromeres have historically been considered heterochromatic however surprisingly we found that CEN chromatin in humans and flies contain euchromatic modifications of H3 signifying an open or flexible chromatin conformation These studies were the foundations for our current investigations into how centromeric chromatin affects transcription and vice versa and the identification of structural or functional elements that define centromere identity Specifically we study endogenous and engineered human chromosomes that contain two similar adjacent blocks of centromeric satellite DNA arrays On these chromosomes usually only one satellite array is assembled into a functional centromere We are testing how and why two physically linked satellite regions are functionally distinct The lab also studies genome stability specifically the formation and behavior of human chromosomal abnormalities During meiosis and mitosis chromosome rearrangements often occur that produce chromosomes that have two or more centromeres These chromosomes are dicentric and in humans occur as frequently as 1 in 1000 individuals Barbara McClintock a famous cytogeneticist and Noble prizewinner studied dicentric chromosomes in maize corn in the 1930s She described dicentrics as inherently unstable chromosomes because the two centromeres often segregated to opposite spindle poles in anaphase leading to chromosome breakage In humans however dicentric chromosomes exhibit unprecedented stability and sometimes are even preferentially segregated to the ooycte in female meiosis Human dicentrics are thought to be so stable because either both centromeres work together to make a super centromere that has a functional advantage during meiotic segregation or one

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/sullivan/index.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    go by Helen so people won t need to struggle to put a u after the q in my name I am from Shanghai and I graduated from East China Normal University with a B S in Biotechnology In 2010 I graduated from Central Michigan University with a M S in Biology I came to Duke through the CMB program and joined in UPGG in 2011 I am very interested

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/silver/lab/mao.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    and cell biological mechanisms of stem cells neural development and neurodevelopmental disorders Precise control of stem cells during development helps dictate the size structure and function of different organs of our body including the adult brain As evidence of this genes essential for neural stem cell division are associated with reduced brain size in humans microcephaly However the genes that regulate stem cell division remain poorly understood as do mechanistic explanations of how aberrant division causes microcephaly Our goal is to help fill this void by uncovering new genes important for stem cell division and brain development In previous studies utilizing a forward genetic screen in mice we identified a requirement for Magoh a component of an RNA binding complex for proper brain size asymmetric cell division genomic stability and neural stem cell function Future projects in our laboratory will build upon these findings to ask several questions including the following How does Magoh regulate neural stem cell division and what are its critical binding partners during brain development What is the role of mRNA metabolism in neural stem cells What additional genes regulate these processes and influence neurodevelopmental diseases such as microcephaly Our approach employs a repertoire of genetic

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/silver/index.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    harmful sequellae This laboratory is interested in developing innovative approaches for curbing microbial infections through the study of the molecular interactions occurring between pathogenic bacteria and prominent immune and epithelial cells We believe that there is a significant amount of crosstalk occurring between bacteria and cells of the host and the outcome dictates how quickly the infection is cleared and the severity of the pathology associated with the infection We also believe that through deciphering this crosstalk we should be able to selectively promote certain beneficial interactions while abrogating the harmful ones and in so doing minimize the severity of the infection and achieving more rapid clearance of the pathogen There are two major research areas being pursued in this laboratory The first is centered around elucidating how mast cells largely overlooked immune cells mobilize key components of the immune system following bacterial infections with the goal of harnessing some of these activities for therapeutic or vaccine development purposes The second focuses on elucidating how uropathogenic Escherichia coli the overwhelming causative agent of urinary tract infections successfully gain entry into epithelial cells of the bladder and cause infections This subject is especially intriguing because of the role the bladder plays as a reservoir for urine Predictably the water tight epithelial barrier of the bladder is especially difficult for bacteria to breech Yet E coli which compared to other pathogens have no specialized organelles for cell entry appears to achieve this feat We believe that by elucidating the molecular events associated with the entry of E coli into bladder epithelial cells and the resulting break down of the bladder barrier we will be able to develop novel strategies to prevent these infections Other studies currently undertaken by one or more members of the laboratory include i examination of how particulate allergens

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/abraham/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    To exert their antimicrobial activities many IFN induced host proteins must specifically localize to pathogen containing vacuoles PCV The mechanisms by which the host recognizes and discriminates between non self PCV and endogenous self membranous structures such as mitochondria or the Golgi apparatus are not well understood One of the main interests of our lab is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that direct the localization of antimicrobial proteins to PCV Towards this goal we are taking two complementary approaches I We conduct mammalian RNAi screens to identify host genes required for PCV targeting II We use bacterial genetics cell biological and biochemical techniques to determine what PCV associated properties are recognized by the innate immune response A second interest of the lab is to understand how the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen C trachomatis can cause chronic genital infections infertility and other complications in women Currently no small animal model exists that recapitulates the chronic disease as it manifests itself in humans We and others have found that humans and mice differ substantially in their respective IFN gamma response pathways and these differences emerge as key determinants of host tropism Therefore a goal of our lab is to develop and study

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/coers/index.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    graduated from the University of Maine in 2011 with a B S in Molecular and Cellular Biology During this time I was lucky enough to work at Hannover Medical School in Hannover Germany to complete my undergraduate thesis looking at actin dynamics in podocytes I also worked at The Jackson Laboratory studying medulloblastoma My experiences led me to pursue a Ph D in the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Program

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/silver/lab/miller.html (2014-06-13)
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