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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    on adhesion of pediatric respiratory pathogens I am especially interested in protein modification by glycosylation of adherence molecules in the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae and am working to define the function of these modifications and more specifically what about the function makes them necessary for bacterial adherence Before coming to Duke I earned my bachelor s in Microbiology with a minor in Spanish at Washington State University in Pullman WA While

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/rempe.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Loyola University Chicago The city presented an abundance of new opportunities but perhaps the most pivotal of them all was researching in Dr Catherine Putonti s lab The theme of the majority of my undergraduate research projects concerned the co evolution of viral pathogens and their hosts the common thread among them being the hypothesis that the degree of correlation between the nucleotide composition of a viral pathogen and its

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/tobin/lab/saelens.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    approach this question through a novel cellular genome wide association approach that combines high throughput cell biology with quantitative human genetics The identified genetic differences serve as the starting point for exploring new cell biology and new human disease susceptibility genes The Hi HOST Discovery Framework We perform genome wide association of cellular traits of host pathogen interactions using a screening approach called Hi HOST high throughput human in vitro susceptibility testing Using cells derived from hundreds of normal individuals we have measured the naturally occurring variation for several intermediate phenotypes of susceptibility Family based association analyses are being used to correlate values from these assays with SNPs on a genome wide scale The traits that are currently the focus of our research efforts are Inflammatory cell death pyroptosis in response to Salmonella as a probe for the caspase 1 inflammatory response Invasion of cells by Salmonella as a measure for actin Rho GTPase signaling during macropinocytosis Cytokine response to Salmonella as a measure of cytokine expression and release likely important for both infection and inflammatory disease Intracellular replication of Yersinia pestis one of the most feared pathogens in human history which we suspect has left lasting evolutionary consequences in

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/ko/index.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    work with bacterial and algal systems and I have also worked with both primary and iPSC derived mouse and human neuron culture systems for investigating the pathogenesis of Alzheimer s disease My research interests are pretty broad at the moment but I hope to hone them in a more specific direction in the coming months during the lab rotation period Only having been here for a few months now I

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/tobin/lab/walton.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    to encode numerous microRNAs many of which were first identified by my group Herpesviruses use microRNAs to downregulate the expression of specific cellular and viral mRNAs in infected particularly latently infected cells Our research is particularly focused on the human γ herpesviruses KSHV and EBV and on the α herpesviruses HSV 1 and HSV 2 In the case of KSHV and EBV we have obtained data showing that virally encoded microRNAs can disrupt regulation of the cell cycle by targeting cellular tumor suppressor proteins such as the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 In this way these viral miRNAs play a key role in promoting the known oncogenic potential of KSHV and EBV In the case of HSV 1 and HSV 2 our data indicate that the viral microRNAs help to maintain these viruses in a latent state in infected neurons at least in part by downregulating viral immediate early proteins that activate entry into the lytic viral life cycle We are actively pursuing the possibility that chemotherapeutic intervention targeting these α herpesvirus microRNAs might disrupt viral latency and hence provide an approach to curing patients persistently infected by these viral pathogens Our research in the retrovirus field is focused on

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/cullen/index.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • The Garcia-Blanco Lab
    between epithelial to mesenchymal states is termed epithelial plasticity My research in the lab currently focuses on cancer cell migration including the mechanisms by which cancer cells migrate and the genes involved in regulating cancer cell migration I am also interested in how epithelial plasticity affects tumor formation and metastasis Publications Somarelli J Schaeffer D Bonano V I Song J W Kemeny G Ettyreddy A and Mariano A Garcia Blanco 2012 Development of fluorescence based alternative splicing reporters for the study of epithelial plasticity RNA 19 116 27 Schaeffer D Reis F P Johnson S J Arraiano C M and A van Hoof 2012 The CR3 motif of Rrp44p is important for interaction with the core exosome and exosome function NAR 40 9298 307 Epub ahead of print July 24 Schaeffer D and A van Hoof 2011 Different nuclease requirements for exosome mediated degradation of normal and nonstop mRNAs PNAS 108 2366 71 Schaeffer D Clark A Klauer A Tsanova B and A van Hoof 2010 Cytoplasmic exosome activities RNA Exosome ed Torbin Jensen 79 90 Book chapter Schaeffer D Tsanova B Barbas A Reis F P Dastidar E G Sanchez Rotunno M Arraiano C M and A van Hoof

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/garcia/lab/lab/schaeffer.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    harmful pathogens How does the innate immune system distinguish between beneficial and harmful microbes when they have similar chemical signatures When activation is warranted how is the innate immune system controlled at both the cellular and organismal level In the Aballay lab I am using C elegans as a model system to address these questions Previous work from our lab demonstrated that the C elegans CED 1 protein a homologue

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/aballay/lab/head.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    targets for cancer To this end I use high throughput technologies coupled with RNAi and o pen r eading f rame ORF expression libraries to perform functional characterization in a systematic and comprehensive manner Current projects include use of loss of function RNAi screening approaches to identify genes essential for cancer cell proliferation and survival as they provide points of vulnerability of the cancer and may translate directly to drug targets Moreover by performing synthetic lethal screens we can identify those genes that are essential only in specific contexts for example in the presence of specific oncogenic mutations or aberrantly activated signaling pathways This approach may be of particular clinical relevance as it provides both a specific drug target and a biomarker to identify patients most likely to respond facilitating the development of personalized molecularly targeted therapy Other projects currently ongoing include gain of function ORF screens to identify 1 modifiers of chemotherapeutic drug response and 2 regulators of signaling pathways commonly activated during tumorigenesis One strategy that has been particularly productive in recent years in the identification of novel cancer relevant genes and mechanisms is the integration of high throughput functional approaches with large scale efforts to enumerate all

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/kim_sy/index.htm (2014-06-13)
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