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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Photo Gallery Conferences and Symposia Insights and Solutions for Emerging Infectious Diseases Symposium April 22 23 2013 Duke Symposium in Celebration of Mycology and Mycologists April 5 6 2012

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/photos/conferences/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    I became interested in microbial pathogenesis especially how pathogens manipulate the host cell for its own benefit and how some are able to evade the host immune response And I ve taken this interest with me to Duke At Duke I m under the mentorship of Dr Raphael Valdivia In his laboratory I m attempting to conduct genetic studies in Chlamydia currently a genetically intractable organism Molecular genetic tools such

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/valdivia/lab/nguyen.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    anomalies and can lead to hypertension and chronic renal failure Recurrent UTI causes additional morbidity Over 25 of women with an initial UTI experience recurrent infections and most occur within the first six months after the initial infection Up to 70 of young children with UTI develop at least one recurrence putting them at a higher risk for renal scarring Most studies have shown that over 40 60 of the recurrent UPEC are the same isolate as caused the initial UTI The pathogenesis of UPEC in a mouse model of bladder infection cystitis is illustrated in Figure 1 UPEC adhere invade and amass in the superficial epithelial cells of the bladder The biomasses of bacteria called intracellular bacterial communities IBC have biofilm like characteristics making this a great model of in vivo biofilm formation These first three steps in pathogenesis rely on the adhesive pilus structure called type 1 pili After IBC formation the bacteria disperse and flux from infected cells where they re adhere and invade new epithelial cells In mice we observe that bacteria can also enter into a chronic persistent state and reemerge to produce further episodes of bacteruria months later Figure 1 A model of cystitis pathogenesis Bacteria enter the normally sterile urinary tract and initiate an infection with adherence to the bladder epithelium Bacteria invade and form IBCs Mature IBCs disperse and introduce bacteria back into the bladder lumen starting a new round of adherence invasion and IBC formation After several rounds and intervention by the host innate immunity the cycle is broken leaving a quiescent reservoir that may recrudesce at a later time Using a cutting edge combination of microbial genetics molecular biology advanced microscopy biochemistry immunology and animal modeling we are exploring how UPEC interacts with the bladder epithelium to persist during acute

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/seed/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans a strain called H99 HEITMAN RECEIVES F1000PRIME FACULTY MEMBER OF THE YEAR AWARD Joseph Heitman MD PhD James B Duke Professor and Chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke University has received a 2013 F1000Prime Faculty Member of the Year Award VALDIVIA APPOINTED VICE DEAN OF BASIC SCIENCE Raphael H Valdivia PhD has been appointed the new

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    research projects concerned the co evolution of viral pathogens and their hosts My work ranged from creating mutant bacteriophages for experimental evolution to writing a program utilizing an alignment free algorithm for phylogenetic analysis of the flaviviridae family After coming to Duke I joined Dr David Tobin s lab to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using zebrafish as an in vivo model system I aim to understand the role of discrete virulence

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/saelens.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    s degree in Life Sciences from St Xavier s College Mumbai and a master s in Biochemistry from MSU Baroda I worked on a summer internship on behavioral genetics under Professor Veronica Rodrigues at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research I created a setup to screen smell blind mutants in order to study olfaction in Drosophila melanogaster During my master s I worked on the characterization of certain genes which

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/sharma.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    valuable lessons from that experience Duke s program was my first choice when researching universities so I was thrilled to start this August Particularly I am interested in microbial pathogenesis so Duke s MGM program really stood out to me in terms of faculty and research areas I m especially interested in host pathogen interaction as it relates to infection About me well I grew up around beaches so I

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/starr.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    the real Boston MA as a research technician in the Lindquist Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT In 2009 I made the long trip down south to attend Duke and am currently a graduate student in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology I m a member of the Frothingham Lab at Duke s human vaccine institute where I work on understanding the initial interactions between M tuberculosis

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/perley.htm (2014-06-13)
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